Theatrical release poster
Cover art of the original UK edition
UK theatrical release poster
Evanna Lynch as Luna Lovegood in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
St Pancras serves as the opening shot of the film's final scene, "nineteen years later".
Rowling completed the final chapters of Deathly Hallows in Room 552 of the Balmoral Hotel.
Daniel Radcliffe filming Dobby's death scene in Pembrokeshire, Wales
A notable outfit of Luna.
Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint at the premiere of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 on 7 July 2011 at Trafalgar Square in London.
J. K. Rowling has said that the main theme of the series is Harry dealing with death.
The motorcycle with a sidecar used by Hagrid and Harry in the film
The Philosopher's Stone as pictured in Michael Maier's 1617 alchemical work Atalanta Fugiens, similar to the presentation of the Deathly Hallows and Resurrection Stone.
The Russian translation of the seventh book—"Harry Potter and the Gift of Death"—went on sale at the bookstore Moskva in Moscow on 13 October 2007
350px

It is the second of two cinematic parts based on J. K. Rowling's 2007 novel of the same name and the eighth and final instalment in the Harry Potter film series.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2

It is the first of two cinematic parts based on J. K. Rowling's 2007 novel of the same name and the seventh instalment in the Harry Potter film series.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1

Luna is played by Irish actress Evanna Lynch in the film adaptations of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and both Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 and Part 2.

- Luna Lovegood

A film adaptation of the novel was released in two parts: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 in November 2010 and Part 2 in July 2011.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Harry assumes that the "awful boy" was his father, James, but in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, he learns via flashback memories that it was actually Severus Snape, who knew both Lily and Petunia when they were children.

- List of supporting Harry Potter characters
Theatrical release poster
Theatrical release poster
UK theatrical release poster
Hogsmeade Village in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Cover art of the original UK edition
Evanna Lynch as Luna Lovegood in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
St Pancras serves as the opening shot of the film's final scene, "nineteen years later".
Daniel Radcliffe filming Dobby's death scene in Pembrokeshire, Wales
Leavesden Studios film set for Potter's cottage in Godric's Hollow
Rowling completed the final chapters of Deathly Hallows in Room 552 of the Balmoral Hotel.
A notable outfit of Luna.
Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint at the premiere of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 on 7 July 2011 at Trafalgar Square in London.
The motorcycle with a sidecar used by Hagrid and Harry in the film
No 4, Privet Drive, Little Whinging
J. K. Rowling has said that the main theme of the series is Harry dealing with death.
Under the stairs, No 4 Privet Drive
The Philosopher's Stone as pictured in Michael Maier's 1617 alchemical work Atalanta Fugiens, similar to the presentation of the Deathly Hallows and Resurrection Stone.
Shell Cottage in Deathly Hallows
The Russian translation of the seventh book—"Harry Potter and the Gift of Death"—went on sale at the bookstore Moskva in Moscow on 13 October 2007
Coat of arms for Beauxbatons as described in the Harry Potter books: "Two crossed, golden wands, each emitting three stars".
350px
Coat of Arms of Ilvermorny
Scribbulus shop, Diagon Alley
Eeylop's Owl Emporium
The window of Flourish & Blotts displaying copies of Magical Me by Gilderoy Lockhart
Gringotts Wizarding Bank
Front of Gringotts Bank
Interior of The Leaky Cauldron
The upper windows of Ollivanders
Slug & Jiggers Apothecary, Diagon Alley
Wiseacre's Wizarding Equipment Shop in Diagon Alley
Madam Puddifoot's Tea and Cakes
Damaged Azkaban as seen in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
The Platform 9 3⁄4 sign is situated in the western departures concourse of London King's Cross railway station, close to platforms 9 and 10, below the walkway leading to the main building.
The GWR 4900 Class 5972 Olton Hall, the steam engine used in the film series as the Hogwarts Express

It is the second of two cinematic parts based on J. K. Rowling's 2007 novel of the same name and the eighth and final instalment in the Harry Potter film series.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2

It is the first of two cinematic parts based on J. K. Rowling's 2007 novel of the same name and the seventh instalment in the Harry Potter film series.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1

The Weasleys' home, known as the Burrow, is located outside the village of Ottery St Catchpole which is situated alongside the River Otter in Devon, England, also near the home of the Lovegoods, the Diggorys and the Fawcetts.

- Places in Harry Potter

Luna is played by Irish actress Evanna Lynch in the film adaptations of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and both Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 and Part 2.

- Luna Lovegood

A film adaptation of the novel was released in two parts: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 in November 2010 and Part 2 in July 2011.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
Theatrical release poster
UK theatrical release poster
Theatrical release poster
Voldemort (centre) with Bellatrix Lestrange (left), Lucius Malfoy (right) and several masked Death Eaters (back) in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Cover art of the original UK edition
Evanna Lynch as Luna Lovegood in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Daniel Radcliffe filming Dobby's death scene in Pembrokeshire, Wales
St Pancras serves as the opening shot of the film's final scene, "nineteen years later".
Rowling completed the final chapters of Deathly Hallows in Room 552 of the Balmoral Hotel.
A notable outfit of Luna.
The motorcycle with a sidecar used by Hagrid and Harry in the film
Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint at the premiere of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 on 7 July 2011 at Trafalgar Square in London.
J. K. Rowling has said that the main theme of the series is Harry dealing with death.
The Philosopher's Stone as pictured in Michael Maier's 1617 alchemical work Atalanta Fugiens, similar to the presentation of the Deathly Hallows and Resurrection Stone.
The Russian translation of the seventh book—"Harry Potter and the Gift of Death"—went on sale at the bookstore Moskva in Moscow on 13 October 2007
350px

It is the first of two cinematic parts based on J. K. Rowling's 2007 novel of the same name and the seventh instalment in the Harry Potter film series.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1

It is the second of two cinematic parts based on J. K. Rowling's 2007 novel of the same name and the eighth and final instalment in the Harry Potter film series.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2

Luna is played by Irish actress Evanna Lynch in the film adaptations of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and both Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 and Part 2.

- Luna Lovegood

A film adaptation of the novel was released in two parts: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 in November 2010 and Part 2 in July 2011.

- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

A second, more deadly attack near the conclusion of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows resulted in over 50 deaths, including Voldemort, who died when the Killing Curse he threw at Harry rebounded on him.

- Death Eater
UK theatrical release poster
The Baraha-mihir or Khana-mihir mound at Berachampa. It was first excavated in 1956–57 revealing a continuous sequence of cultural remains from 11th century BC pre-Mouryan period to 12th century AD Pala period.
BSNL Telephone Exchange, Panihati
Omega and Infinity Benchmark, office buildings in Salt Lake, Kolkata
Bengal Chemicals and Pharmaceuticals at Panihati
The Bengal Intelligent Park in Sector V.
Panihati Works of Texmaco
The Cognizant Technology Solutions office in Sector V.
Narula Institute of Technology
Baranagore Ramakrishna Mission Ashrama High School
Dakshineswar Kali Temple
Durga idol at a pandel in Baranagar
Cityside view of the new Integrated Terminal of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose International Airport
Kolkata Suburban EMU Train
Kolkata Metro's largest station Noapara metro station at Noapara, Baranagar

Panihati is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Panihati

New Barrackpore is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- New Barrackpore

Bhatpara is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Bhatpara

Patulia is a census town in Barrackpore II CD Block in Barrackpore subdivision in North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Patulia

Barrackpore Subdivision consists of 16 municipalities (Kanchrapara, Halisahar, Naihati, Bhatpara, Garulia, Barrackpore, North Barrackpur, New Barrackpur, Titagarh, Khardaha, Panihati, Kamarhati, Baranagar, Dum Dum, North Dumdum and South Dumdum) and 2 community development blocks: Barrackpore I and Barrackpore II.

- North 24 Parganas district
The Baraha-mihir or Khana-mihir mound at Berachampa. It was first excavated in 1956–57 revealing a continuous sequence of cultural remains from 11th century BC pre-Mouryan period to 12th century AD Pala period.
St Bartholomew's Cathedral, Barrackpore
Dutch Kuthi in Baranagar
Omega and Infinity Benchmark, office buildings in Salt Lake, Kolkata
Barrackpore Chiria More is the junction of Barrackpore Trunk Road and Surendranath Banerjee Road
Clive House, Ramgarh, Nagerbazar
Satellite view of city Baranagar
The Bengal Intelligent Park in Sector V.
Tala Bridge, Barrackpore Trunk Road ( BT Road) is a four-laned road in Kolkata, India. It connects Shyambazar 5-point Crossing with Barrackpore Chiria More.
Shyamasundari Temple, Purba Sinthee
Baranagar Road railway station
The Cognizant Technology Solutions office in Sector V.
Kolkata new proposed Metro Line 5 (Baranagar - Barrackpore)
Alcove Gloria (Apartment Complex), Lake Town
Ferry ghat at Kuthi Ghat in Baranagar
Narula Institute of Technology
Kendriya Vidyalaya Barrackpore Army HQ
Saltee Plaza (Commercial Complex), Nagerbazar
Indian Statistical Institute
Baranagore Ramakrishna Mission Ashrama High School
B.N. Bose Subdivisional Hospital, B.T. Road
Diamond Plaza Mall, Shyamnagar-Satgachhi
Pond Heron in Baranagar
Dakshineswar Kali Temple
Disha Eye Hospitals, Ghosh Para Road
Inside View of Diamond Plaza Mall, Shyamnagar-Satgachhi
Stork-billed Kingfisher in Baranagar
Durga idol at a pandel in Baranagar
White-throated kingfisher in Baranagar
Cityside view of the new Integrated Terminal of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose International Airport
Kolkata Suburban EMU Train
Kolkata Metro's largest station Noapara metro station at Noapara, Baranagar

Barrackpore (also known as Barrackpur) is a city and a municipality of urban Kolkata of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Barrackpore

South Dum Dum is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- South Dum Dum

Baranagar or Baranagore is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Baranagar

Ruiya is a census town in Barrackpore II CD Block in Barrackpore subdivision in North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Ruiya

In 1817, Falta and Baranagar and in 1820, some portions of Nadia's Balanda and Anwarpur were encompassed to it.

- North 24 Parganas district
The Baraha-mihir or Khana-mihir mound at Berachampa. It was first excavated in 1956–57 revealing a continuous sequence of cultural remains from 11th century BC pre-Mouryan period to 12th century AD Pala period.
Coin of Antigonus, the Greek inscription reads "ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ" meaning [coin] of King Antigonus
Roman copy of a bronze statue of Seleucus found in Herculaneum. Now located at the Naples National Archaeological Museum.
Marble bust of Demetrius I Poliorcetes. Roman copy from 1st century AD of a Greek original from 3rd century BC
Bust of Ptolemy I Soter, located at the Louvre.
The Battle of Ipsus in 301 BC. 19th century engraving.
The Kingdoms of Antigonus and his rivals circa 303 BC
Roman copy of a bronze statue of Seleucus found in Herculaneum. Now located at the Naples National Archaeological Museum.
A fresco in Pompeii possibly depicting Lanassa and Demetrius I, ca. 50–40 BC.
Illustrated depiction of Ptolemy by E. Wallis
The successor kingdoms before the battle of Ipsus, 303 BC.
Seleucus led the Royal Hypaspistai during Alexander's Persian campaign.
Coin of Demetrius I (337-283 BC). Greek inscription reads ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ([coin] of King Demetrius)
273x273px
Demetrius, son of Antigonus
Ptolemy I Soter, an officer under Alexander the Great, was nominated as the satrap of Egypt. Ptolemy made Ptolemaic Egypt independent and proclaimed himself Basileus and Pharaoh in 305 BC.
Demetrius I Poliorcetes portrayed on a tetradrachm coin
Lysimachus, one of the victors of Ipsus.
Damaged Roman copy of a bust of Seleucus I, Louvre
The Siege of Rhodes (305-304 BC), led by Demetrius.
Schematic diagram of the Battle of Ipsus, 301 BC
The kingdoms of Antigonus, Seleucus I, Ptolemy I, Cassander and Lysimachus
Bust of Seleucus, whose elephants decided the battle
Seleucus I coin depicting Alexander the Great's horse Bucephalus
Kingdoms of the Diadochi after the battle of Ipsus, c. 301 BC.
Kingdom of Seleucus
Other diadochi
Kingdom of Cassander
Kingdom of Lysimachus
Kingdom of Ptolemy
Epirus
Coin of Lysimachus with an image of a horned Alexander the Great
Tetradrachm of Seleucus from Seleucia. Obverse: the head of Zeus, Reverse: Athena with elephants
Seleukos I Nikator. 312–281 BC. AR Stater (22 mm, 16.88 g, 12 h). Susa mint. Struck circa 288/7 BC. Head of Zeus right, wearing laurel wreath / Elephant advancing right; above, spearhead right; K below
Portrait of Seleucus I or possibly a Greco-Bactrian ruler, with royal diadem. Temple of the Oxus, Takht-i Sangin, 3rd-2nd century BC, Tajikistan.
The Hellenistic world view after Seleucus: ancient world map of Eratosthenes (276–194 BC), incorporating information from the campaigns of Alexander and his successors
Tetradrachm of Seleucus I, minted at Susa. Obv: Portrait of male figure (probably Seleucus, but possibly Alexander or Dionysus), wearing a leopard-skin helmet, with a bull's ear and horns. Rev: Nike, holding a wreath over a trophy, probably referring to the Battle of Ipsus. Legend "King Seleucus".
Coin of Demetrius, with the text ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ (King Demetrius)
Tetradrachm of Antiochus I. Obv: Seleucus I, with bull's horns. Rev: Apollo, with a bow, seated on the omphalus
Cult relief showing Seleucus I Nicator crowning the Gad of Dura.

Antigonus I Monophthalmus, ruler of Phrygia, and his son Demetrius I of Macedon were pitted against the coalition of three other successors of Alexander: Cassander, ruler of Macedon; Lysimachus, ruler of Thrace; and Seleucus I Nicator, ruler of Babylonia and Persia.

- Battle of Ipsus

He was the son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus and Stratonice.

- Demetrius I of Macedon

After the death of Alexander in June 323 BC, Seleucus initially supported Perdiccas, the regent of Alexander's empire, and was appointed Commander of the Companions and chiliarch at the Partition of Babylon in 323 BC. However, after the outbreak of the Wars of the Diadochi in 322, Perdiccas' military failures against Ptolemy in Egypt led to the mutiny of his troops in Pelusium.

- Seleucus I Nicator

After a series of wars between Alexander's successors, Ptolemy gained a claim to Judea in southern Syria, which was disputed with the Syrian king Seleucus I.

- Ptolemy I Soter

From there, Perdiccas turned west towards Phrygia as a provocation toward Antigonus, who escaped with his son Demetrius to Greece, where he obtained the favor of Antipater, the viceroy of Macedonia (321 BC), and Craterus, one of Alexander's top generals.

- Antigonus I Monophthalmus
Coin of Antigonus, the Greek inscription reads "ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ" meaning [coin] of King Antigonus
Coin of Antigonus, the Greek inscription reads "ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ" meaning [coin] of King Antigonus
Bust of Ptolemy I Soter, located at the Louvre.
Roman copy of a bronze statue of Seleucus found in Herculaneum. Now located at the Naples National Archaeological Museum.
Hellenistic marble bust of Lysimachus at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum, dated circa 300 BC.
The Battle of Ipsus in 301 BC. 19th century engraving.
The Kingdoms of Antigonus and his rivals circa 303 BC
Illustrated depiction of Ptolemy by E. Wallis
Roman copy of a bronze statue of Seleucus found in Herculaneum. Now located at the Naples National Archaeological Museum.
A marble bust of Lysimachus, an Augustan Roman era copy of a Hellenistic Greek original dated to the 2nd century BC, National Archaeological Museum, Naples
The successor kingdoms before the battle of Ipsus, 303 BC.
273x273px
Seleucus led the Royal Hypaspistai during Alexander's Persian campaign.
Obverse of coin of Lysimachus: The horned Alexander appears as the king's divine patron.
Demetrius, son of Antigonus
Ptolemy I Soter, an officer under Alexander the Great, was nominated as the satrap of Egypt. Ptolemy made Ptolemaic Egypt independent and proclaimed himself Basileus and Pharaoh in 305 BC.
Tetradrachm of Lysimachus. The Greek inscription reads: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ "[coin] of King Lysimachus".
Lysimachus, one of the victors of Ipsus.
Damaged Roman copy of a bust of Seleucus I, Louvre
Kingdom of Lysimachus
Other diadochi
Kingdom of Cassander
Kingdom of Seleucus I Nicator
Kingdom of Ptolemy I Soter
Epirus
Other
Carthage
Rome
Greek colonies
Schematic diagram of the Battle of Ipsus, 301 BC
The kingdoms of Antigonus, Seleucus I, Ptolemy I, Cassander and Lysimachus
Bust of Seleucus, whose elephants decided the battle
Seleucus I coin depicting Alexander the Great's horse Bucephalus
Kingdoms of the Diadochi after the battle of Ipsus, c. 301 BC.
Kingdom of Seleucus
Other diadochi
Kingdom of Cassander
Kingdom of Lysimachus
Kingdom of Ptolemy
Epirus
Coin of Lysimachus with an image of a horned Alexander the Great
Tetradrachm of Seleucus from Seleucia. Obverse: the head of Zeus, Reverse: Athena with elephants
Seleukos I Nikator. 312–281 BC. AR Stater (22 mm, 16.88 g, 12 h). Susa mint. Struck circa 288/7 BC. Head of Zeus right, wearing laurel wreath / Elephant advancing right; above, spearhead right; K below
Portrait of Seleucus I or possibly a Greco-Bactrian ruler, with royal diadem. Temple of the Oxus, Takht-i Sangin, 3rd-2nd century BC, Tajikistan.
The Hellenistic world view after Seleucus: ancient world map of Eratosthenes (276–194 BC), incorporating information from the campaigns of Alexander and his successors
Tetradrachm of Seleucus I, minted at Susa. Obv: Portrait of male figure (probably Seleucus, but possibly Alexander or Dionysus), wearing a leopard-skin helmet, with a bull's ear and horns. Rev: Nike, holding a wreath over a trophy, probably referring to the Battle of Ipsus. Legend "King Seleucus".
Coin of Demetrius, with the text ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ (King Demetrius)
Tetradrachm of Antiochus I. Obv: Seleucus I, with bull's horns. Rev: Apollo, with a bow, seated on the omphalus
Cult relief showing Seleucus I Nicator crowning the Gad of Dura.

Antigonus I Monophthalmus, ruler of Phrygia, and his son Demetrius I of Macedon were pitted against the coalition of three other successors of Alexander: Cassander, ruler of Macedon; Lysimachus, ruler of Thrace; and Seleucus I Nicator, ruler of Babylonia and Persia.

- Battle of Ipsus

After the death of Alexander in June 323 BC, Seleucus initially supported Perdiccas, the regent of Alexander's empire, and was appointed Commander of the Companions and chiliarch at the Partition of Babylon in 323 BC. However, after the outbreak of the Wars of the Diadochi in 322, Perdiccas' military failures against Ptolemy in Egypt led to the mutiny of his troops in Pelusium.

- Seleucus I Nicator

After a series of wars between Alexander's successors, Ptolemy gained a claim to Judea in southern Syria, which was disputed with the Syrian king Seleucus I.

- Ptolemy I Soter

In 315 BC, Lysimachus joined Cassander, Ptolemy and Seleucus against Antigonus, who, however, diverted his attention by stirring up Thracian and Scythian tribes against him.

- Lysimachus

During the First War of the Diadochi, he formed a coalition with Antipater, Craterus and Ptolemy.

- Antigonus I Monophthalmus
Coin of Antigonus, the Greek inscription reads "ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ" meaning [coin] of King Antigonus
Coin of Antigonus, the Greek inscription reads "ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ" meaning [coin] of King Antigonus
Roman copy of a bronze statue of Seleucus found in Herculaneum. Now located at the Naples National Archaeological Museum.
Bust of Ptolemy I Soter, located at the Louvre.
The various kingdoms of the Diadochi c. 301 BC
The Battle of Ipsus in 301 BC. 19th century engraving.
The Kingdoms of Antigonus and his rivals circa 303 BC
Roman copy of a bronze statue of Seleucus found in Herculaneum. Now located at the Naples National Archaeological Museum.
Illustrated depiction of Ptolemy by E. Wallis
Ancient Macedonian soldiers, arms, and armaments (from the tomb in Agios Athanasios, Thessaloniki in Greece, 4th century BC)
The successor kingdoms before the battle of Ipsus, 303 BC.
Seleucus led the Royal Hypaspistai during Alexander's Persian campaign.
273x273px
The distribution of satrapies in the Macedonian empire after the settlement in Babylon, 323 BC
Demetrius, son of Antigonus
Ptolemy I Soter, an officer under Alexander the Great, was nominated as the satrap of Egypt. Ptolemy made Ptolemaic Egypt independent and proclaimed himself Basileus and Pharaoh in 305 BC.
Eumenes defeating Neoptolemus, in the Battle of the Hellespont (321 BC), Wars of the Diadochi. 1878 engraving.
Lysimachus, one of the victors of Ipsus.
Damaged Roman copy of a bust of Seleucus I, Louvre
Schematic diagram of the Battle of Ipsus, 301 BC
The kingdoms of Antigonus, Seleucus I, Ptolemy I, Cassander and Lysimachus
Bust of Seleucus, whose elephants decided the battle
Seleucus I coin depicting Alexander the Great's horse Bucephalus
Kingdoms of the Diadochi after the battle of Ipsus, c. 301 BC.
Kingdom of Seleucus
Other diadochi
Kingdom of Cassander
Kingdom of Lysimachus
Kingdom of Ptolemy
Epirus
Coin of Lysimachus with an image of a horned Alexander the Great
Tetradrachm of Seleucus from Seleucia. Obverse: the head of Zeus, Reverse: Athena with elephants
Seleukos I Nikator. 312–281 BC. AR Stater (22 mm, 16.88 g, 12 h). Susa mint. Struck circa 288/7 BC. Head of Zeus right, wearing laurel wreath / Elephant advancing right; above, spearhead right; K below
Portrait of Seleucus I or possibly a Greco-Bactrian ruler, with royal diadem. Temple of the Oxus, Takht-i Sangin, 3rd-2nd century BC, Tajikistan.
The Hellenistic world view after Seleucus: ancient world map of Eratosthenes (276–194 BC), incorporating information from the campaigns of Alexander and his successors
Tetradrachm of Seleucus I, minted at Susa. Obv: Portrait of male figure (probably Seleucus, but possibly Alexander or Dionysus), wearing a leopard-skin helmet, with a bull's ear and horns. Rev: Nike, holding a wreath over a trophy, probably referring to the Battle of Ipsus. Legend "King Seleucus".
Coin of Demetrius, with the text ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ (King Demetrius)
Tetradrachm of Antiochus I. Obv: Seleucus I, with bull's horns. Rev: Apollo, with a bow, seated on the omphalus
Cult relief showing Seleucus I Nicator crowning the Gad of Dura.

Antigonus I Monophthalmus, ruler of Phrygia, and his son Demetrius I of Macedon were pitted against the coalition of three other successors of Alexander: Cassander, ruler of Macedon; Lysimachus, ruler of Thrace; and Seleucus I Nicator, ruler of Babylonia and Persia.

- Battle of Ipsus

He was a major figure in the Wars of the Diadochi after Alexander's death, declaring himself king in 306 BC and establishing the Antigonid dynasty.

- Antigonus I Monophthalmus

After the death of Alexander in June 323 BC, Seleucus initially supported Perdiccas, the regent of Alexander's empire, and was appointed Commander of the Companions and chiliarch at the Partition of Babylon in 323 BC. However, after the outbreak of the Wars of the Diadochi in 322, Perdiccas' military failures against Ptolemy in Egypt led to the mutiny of his troops in Pelusium.

- Seleucus I Nicator

After a series of wars between Alexander's successors, Ptolemy gained a claim to Judea in southern Syria, which was disputed with the Syrian king Seleucus I.

- Ptolemy I Soter

Ptolemy received Egypt; Laomedon received Syria and Phoenicia; Philotas took Cilicia; Peithon took Media; Antigonus received Phrygia, Lycia and Pamphylia; Asander received Caria; Menander received Lydia; Lysimachus received Thrace; Leonnatus received Hellespontine Phrygia; and Neoptolemus had Armenia.

- Wars of the Diadochi
Coin of Antigonus, the Greek inscription reads "ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ" meaning [coin] of King Antigonus
The Baraha-mihir or Khana-mihir mound at Berachampa. It was first excavated in 1956–57 revealing a continuous sequence of cultural remains from 11th century BC pre-Mouryan period to 12th century AD Pala period.
Dutch Kuthi in Baranagar
Omega and Infinity Benchmark, office buildings in Salt Lake, Kolkata
Clive House, Ramgarh, Nagerbazar
Satellite view of city Baranagar
The Bengal Intelligent Park in Sector V.
Shyamasundari Temple, Purba Sinthee
Baranagar Road railway station
The Cognizant Technology Solutions office in Sector V.
Alcove Gloria (Apartment Complex), Lake Town
Ferry ghat at Kuthi Ghat in Baranagar
Narula Institute of Technology
Saltee Plaza (Commercial Complex), Nagerbazar
Indian Statistical Institute
Baranagore Ramakrishna Mission Ashrama High School
Diamond Plaza Mall, Shyamnagar-Satgachhi
Pond Heron in Baranagar
Dakshineswar Kali Temple
Inside View of Diamond Plaza Mall, Shyamnagar-Satgachhi
Stork-billed Kingfisher in Baranagar
Durga idol at a pandel in Baranagar
White-throated kingfisher in Baranagar
Cityside view of the new Integrated Terminal of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose International Airport
Kolkata Suburban EMU Train
Kolkata Metro's largest station Noapara metro station at Noapara, Baranagar

South Dum Dum is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- South Dum Dum

Baranagar or Baranagore is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Baranagar

Bhatpara is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Bhatpara

Patulia is a census town in Barrackpore II CD Block in Barrackpore subdivision in North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Patulia

In 1817, Falta and Baranagar and in 1820, some portions of Nadia's Balanda and Anwarpur were encompassed to it.

- North 24 Parganas district
The Baraha-mihir or Khana-mihir mound at Berachampa. It was first excavated in 1956–57 revealing a continuous sequence of cultural remains from 11th century BC pre-Mouryan period to 12th century AD Pala period.
The Baraha-mihir or Khana-mihir mound at Berachampa. It was first excavated in 1956–57 revealing a continuous sequence of cultural remains from 11th century BC pre-Mouryan period to 12th century AD Pala period.
Dutch Kuthi in Baranagar
St Bartholomew's Cathedral, Barrackpore
Omega and Infinity Benchmark, office buildings in Salt Lake, Kolkata
Clive House, Ramgarh, Nagerbazar
Satellite view of city Baranagar
Barrackpore Chiria More is the junction of Barrackpore Trunk Road and Surendranath Banerjee Road
The Bengal Intelligent Park in Sector V.
Shyamasundari Temple, Purba Sinthee
Baranagar Road railway station
Tala Bridge, Barrackpore Trunk Road ( BT Road) is a four-laned road in Kolkata, India. It connects Shyambazar 5-point Crossing with Barrackpore Chiria More.
The Cognizant Technology Solutions office in Sector V.
Alcove Gloria (Apartment Complex), Lake Town
Ferry ghat at Kuthi Ghat in Baranagar
Kolkata new proposed Metro Line 5 (Baranagar - Barrackpore)
Narula Institute of Technology
Saltee Plaza (Commercial Complex), Nagerbazar
Indian Statistical Institute
Kendriya Vidyalaya Barrackpore Army HQ
Baranagore Ramakrishna Mission Ashrama High School
Diamond Plaza Mall, Shyamnagar-Satgachhi
Pond Heron in Baranagar
B.N. Bose Subdivisional Hospital, B.T. Road
Dakshineswar Kali Temple
Inside View of Diamond Plaza Mall, Shyamnagar-Satgachhi
Stork-billed Kingfisher in Baranagar
Disha Eye Hospitals, Ghosh Para Road
Durga idol at a pandel in Baranagar
White-throated kingfisher in Baranagar
Cityside view of the new Integrated Terminal of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose International Airport
Kolkata Suburban EMU Train
Kolkata Metro's largest station Noapara metro station at Noapara, Baranagar

South Dum Dum is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- South Dum Dum

New Barrackpore is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- New Barrackpore

Baranagar or Baranagore is a city and a municipality of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Baranagar

Barrackpore (also known as Barrackpur) is a city and a municipality of urban Kolkata of North 24 Parganas district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

- Barrackpore

In 1817, Falta and Baranagar and in 1820, some portions of Nadia's Balanda and Anwarpur were encompassed to it.

- North 24 Parganas district
The Baraha-mihir or Khana-mihir mound at Berachampa. It was first excavated in 1956–57 revealing a continuous sequence of cultural remains from 11th century BC pre-Mouryan period to 12th century AD Pala period.