United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles (9.8 million km 2 ), the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles (10.1 million km 2 ). With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York.

Frank J. Dodd

Frank Dodd
In the 1977 Democratic primary for the Senate seat, Dodd faced opposition from Assemblyman Eldridge Hawkins and tennis star Althea Gibson, who was serving as state Athletic Commissioner. Dodd was supported by the Essex County Democratic organization under County Chairman Harry Lerner. With Gibson and Hawkins splitting the anti-organization vote, Dodd won the nomination and the subsequent general election. In 1981, Dodd gave up his Senate seat to run in the Democratic primary for Governor of New Jersey. His successor in the Senate was Richard Codey. The 1981 Democratic primary included a crowded field of 13 candidates, led by U.S. Representative James Florio, U.S. Representative Robert A.

East Orange, New Jersey

East OrangeEast Orange, NJEast Orange City
Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics ) are Althea Gibson Early Childhood Academy (171 students; in grades PreK and K), Wahlstrom Early Childhood Center (167; PreK-K), Benjamin Banneker Academy (491; PreK-5), Edward T. Bowser Sr. School of Excellence (719; PreK-5), George Washington Carver Institute of Science and Technology (417; PreK-5), Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. Academy (254; K-5), Mildred Barry Garvin School (350; PreK-5), Whitney E. Houston Academy of Creative & Performing Arts (436; PreK-8), Langston Hughes Elementary School (562; PreK-5), J. Garfield Jackson Sr.

Williston School

Williston High SchoolWilliston Industrial High SchoolWilliston Industrial School
Althea Gibson (1949), tennis champion – the first black player to win grand slam events. Meadowlark Lemon (1952), star basketball player with the Harlem Globetrotters. Joseph McNeil (1959), one of the Greensboro Four and air-force general. Phillip Clay (1964), chancellor of MIT. Sam Bowens, major league baseball player. Class of 1931 – photographed by Louis T. Moore. Williston Middle School of Math, Science & Technology – website of the current institution.

Hubert A. Eaton

Dr Hubert A. Eaton
He would go on to win the ATA national doubles championship, and served as the coach and mentor of Althea Gibson, the first black Wimbledon champion. He attended the University of Michigan Medical School and then established a practice in Wilmington, NC, where he was a distinguished physician and noted civil rights activist, fighting for access to recreational facilities, the desegregation of public schools, and, most notably, the fight for access to public hospital facilities for black physicians. In 1956, Eaton sued a county hospital over a policy that barred non-white physicians from seeing patients at the hospital. In 1964 he was charged with murder.

South Carolina

SCState of South CarolinaS.C.
South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States and the easternmost of the Deep South. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

French Open

French ChampionshipsRoland GarrosFrench
The French Open (Championnats Internationaux de France de Tennis), also called Roland-Garros, is a major tennis tournament held over two weeks between late May and early June at the Stade Roland-Garros in Paris, France. The venue is named after the French aviator Roland Garros. It is the premier clay court tennis championship event in the world and the second of four annual Grand Slam tournaments, the other three being the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open. The French Open is currently the only Grand Slam event held on clay, and it is the zenith of the spring clay court season.

African Americans

blackAfrican-AmericanAfrican American
African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa. The term typically refers to descendants of enslaved black people who are from the United States. As a compound adjective, the term is usually hyphenated as African-American.

Cleveland

Cleveland, OhioCleveland, OHCity of Cleveland
Playhouse Square includes the State, Palace, Allen, Hanna, and Ohio theaters within what is known as the Cleveland Theater District. Playhouse Square's resident performing arts companies include Cleveland Play House, Cleveland State University Department of Theatre and Dance, and Great Lakes Theater Festival. The center hosts various Broadway musicals, special concerts, speaking engagements, and other events throughout the year. One Playhouse Square, now the headquarters for Cleveland's public broadcasters, was initially used as the broadcast studios of WJW (AM), where disc jockey Alan Freed first popularized the term "rock and roll".

Charleston, South Carolina

CharlestonCharleston, SCCharles Town
Charleston is the oldest and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina's coastline and is located on Charleston Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. Charleston had an estimated population of 134,875 in 2017.

Essex County, New Jersey

Essex CountyEssex Essex County, New Jersey
Essex County is a county in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county's population was 808,285, making it the state's third-most populous county, an increase of 3.1% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 783,969, in turn a decrease of 1.2% (9,664 fewer residents) from the 793,633 enumerated in the 2000 Census. In 2010, the county dropped down to third-largest, behind Middlesex County, and was one of only two counties in the state to see a decline between 2000 and 2010 (Cape May County being the other). Its county seat is Newark, the most populous city in the state.

Bob Ryland

During his lifetime, Ryland has taught and coached many professionals, including; Harold Solomon, Renee Blount, Leslie Allen, Arthur Ashe, Bruce Foxworth, Venus Williams and Serena Williams. In addition to coaching professionals, Ryland has also taught several celebrities, including; Barbra Streisand, Bill Cosby, Tony Bennett, Mike Wallace, Eartha Kitt, Dustin Hoffman, David Dinkins and Mary McFadden.

Renee Blount

In 1979, Blount made history when she became the first African American woman to win a professional tennis tournament since Althea Gibson when she won the Futures of Columbus. In 1984, Blount achieved her best Grand Slam women's doubles result, reaching the quarterfinals at Wimbledon partnering Janet Newberry, losing to Kathy Jordan and Anne Smith 6–0, 6–1. Blount was, also, a mixed doubles semi-finalist at the French Open and extended Martina Navratilova to three sets at the Australian Open in 1980. She has competed in Wimbledon five times including a 1986 doubles quarter finalist appearance.

List of female tennis players

female tennis playertennis playerstennis player
This is a list of female tennis players who meet one or more of the following criteria:

26th Legislative District (New Jersey)

26th Legislative DistrictDistrict 2626th
Dodd faced opposition from Assemblyman Eldridge Hawkins and tennis star Althea Gibson, who was serving as state Athletic Commissioner. Dodd was supported by the Essex County Democratic organization under County Chairman Harry Lerner. With Gibson and Hawkins splitting the anti-organization vote, Dodd won the nomination and the subsequent general election. In 1983, Leanna Brown challenged her former running-mate, James P.

New Hanover County, North Carolina

New Hanover CountyNew HanoverNew Hanover Precinct
Wilmington. Bayshore. Castle Hayne. Hightsville. Kings Grant. Kirkland. Masonboro. Murraysville. Myrtle Grove. Ogden. Sea Breeze. Seagate. Silver Lake. Skippers Corner. Wrightsboro. Wilmington Beach. Monkey Junction. [[National Register of Historic Places listings in New Hanover County, North Carolina]]. Cape Fear Museum. Carolina Beach NC 411. Wrightsville Beach NC 411. New Hanover County government official website. NCGenWeb New Hanover County - free genealogy resources for the county. Wilmington North Carolina Relocation Guide. Wilmington North Carolina Real Estate Search.

Cape Fear (region)

Cape FearMetropolitan Statistical AreaCape Fear region
Wilmington Urban Area Metropolitan Planning Organization. Cape Fear Council of Governments. InsiderInfo Guide to Wilmington. InsiderInfo Guide to Southport. InsiderInfo Guide to Topsail.

Venus Williams

VenusV. WilliamsV.Williams
She first reached the No. 1 ranking on February 25, 2002, the first African American woman to do so in the Open Era, and the second all time since Althea Gibson. Williams' seven Grand Slam singles titles are tied for 12th on the all-time list, and 8th on the Open Era list, more than any other active female player except Serena. She has reached 16 Grand Slam finals, most recently at Wimbledon in 2017. She has also won 14 Grand Slam Women's doubles titles, all with Serena; the pair is unbeaten in Grand Slam doubles finals. [19] Williams also has two Mixed Doubles titles.

North Carolina

NCNorthN.C.
On October 25, 1836, construction began on the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad to connect the port city of Wilmington with the state capital of Raleigh. In 1849 the North Carolina Railroad was created by act of the legislature to extend that railroad west to Greensboro, High Point, and Charlotte. During the Civil War, the Wilmington-to-Raleigh stretch of the railroad would be vital to the Confederate war effort; supplies shipped into Wilmington would be moved by rail through Raleigh to the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. During the antebellum period, North Carolina was an overwhelmingly rural state, even by Southern standards.

Pender County, North Carolina

PenderPender CountyHistory of Pender County
Pender County is part of the Wilmington, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county was formed in 1875 from New Hanover County. It was named for William Dorsey Pender of Edgecombe County, a Confederate general mortally wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg. It is in the southeastern section of the state and is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean and New Hanover, Brunswick, Columbus, Bladen, Sampson, Duplin, and Onslow Counties. The present land area is 870.76 sqmi and the 1990 population was 28,855. The county commissioners were ordered to hold their first meeting at Rocky Point. The act provided for the establishment of the town of Cowan as the county seat.

Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina

Wrightsville BeachWrightsvilleWrightsville Sound
Wright of Wilmington (1842-1890), who developed a local realtor company. A post office called Wrightsville was subsequently established in 1881. Accessibility to the beach improved in 1887 when Shell Road was completed, running from Wilmington to the edge of the current Intracoastal Waterway. The town was incorporated in 1899 as Wrightsville Beach, in honor of the Wright family of Wilmington and the community of Wrightsville on the mainland side of Harbor Island. By the late 1800s, ownership of the land had passed to the MacRae family of Wilmington.

University of North Carolina at Wilmington

UNC WilmingtonUNC-WilmingtonUNCW
The University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW), sometimes referred to as UNC Wilmington or affectionately as The Dub, is a public, research university in Wilmington, North Carolina. UNCW enrolls 16,747 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students each year as part of the 17-campus University of North Carolina System. UNCW opened its doors on September 4, 1947 as Wilmington College. At the time the school operated as a junior college, offering freshman-level courses to 238 students during the first school year, 75% of whom were veterans returning from military service following World War II.

Dawson's Creek

PaceyCapesideEvelyn Ryan
During its first four seasons, Dawson's Creek was primarily filmed in Wilmington, North Carolina, at EUE/Screen Gems studios and on location around Wilmington, with Southport and Wrightsville Beach also standing in for the fictional town of Capeside, a port city located in mid-Cape Cod. The Wilmington area benefited greatly from the show. While a number of films, commercials and music videos had been shot at the studios, Dawson's Creek was the first to occupy numerous soundstages for many years. Other shows as One Tree Hill later occupied some of those same soundstages for several years and used some of the same locations in Wilmington.

Kure Beach, North Carolina

Kure BeachKureKure's Beach" NC
Kure Beach (ˈkjʊəri KYUR-ee) is a town in New Hanover County, North Carolina about 15 miles south of Wilmington. It is part of the Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 2,012 at the 2010 census. It is found on Pleasure Island directly south of the Wilmington Beach annex of Carolina Beach and just north of Fort Fisher. A post office called Kure Beach has been in operation since 1942. The town was named for a family of settlers. On the night of July 24/25, 1943, a German U-boat fired at least three shells to attack the "Ethyl-Dow Chemical Company" plant at "Kure's Beach" (post-war: Kure Beach), but instead hit the Cape Fear River.