List of German prisoner-of-war camps

List of prisoner-of-war camps in GermanyList of German World War II POW campsList of POW camps in Germany
Stalag Luft I Barth. Stalag Luft II Litzmannstadt (Poland). Stalag Luft III Sagan. Stalag Luft IV Groß Tychow (Poland). Stalag Luft V Halle/Saale. Stalag Luft VI Heydekrug. Stalag Luft VII Bankau. Stalag Luft VIII-B Lamsdorf. Stalag Luft XI-B. Luft-Stalag 13 – in the TV series Hogan's Heroes. Stalag 17 – in the 1953 film of that name. Stalag Luft Nord – in the 1963 movie The Great Escape. Dusterstadt – in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles / The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones film episode "Chapter 8: Trenches of Hell". Concentration Camp. German camps in occupied Poland during World War II. List of Nazi concentration camps. Lists of World War II prisoner-of-war camps.

Bernard Barker

Bernard L. Barker
The Germans held him as a prisoner of war at Stalag Luft I in Barth. The Red Army liberated the camp on May 2, 1945. After the war, Barker returned to Cuba and joined the secret police under Fulgencio Batista. He was later recruited by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and worked for them as an undercover agent. He also did work for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). He joined the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion. In September 1971, his former CIA superior, E. Howard Hunt, recruited him for the "Plumbers", the Nixon White House's "Special Investigations Unit". He was recruited by Hunt to find background information on Daniel Ellsberg.

Hedley Fowler

Bill FowlerFlt. Lt. H.N. FowlerH. N. Fowler
Fowler was sent to Dulag Luft transit camp at Oberursel before being transferred to Stalag Luft I at Barth, arriving there on 5 July 1940. By November 1941, Fowler was acting as a distributor of Red Cross parcels. During his time in captivity Fowler had been making a bogus German uniform out of various bits of material and a civilian suit, smuggling them into the parcel office which was outside the main prisoners' compound. On 5 November 1941, he dressed in his bogus German uniform from the parcel office and climbed over the lightly guarded perimeter fence. Outside the camp he changed into his civilian suit.

Bertram James

Bertram "Jimmy" JamesJimmy JamesBertram ('Jimmy') James
Later he was sent to Stalag Luft I at Barth from which camp he made an attempt to escape during an air raid on 21st October, 1941. His attempt, which was made after a tunnel had been constructed, was unsuccessful and as a punishment he received 14 days' solitary confinement. In November, 1941, he was discovered whilst engaged in the construction of a second tunnel, and was sentenced to another 14 days' solitary confinement. While at Stalag Luft I, he worked on the construction of at least five other tunnels, all without success.

Josef Bryks

On 22 September 1944 Bryks was brought to Stalag Luft I near Barth in Western Pomerania. Because of his injuries from Gestapo interrogations, Bryks appeared before an international medical board on 6 November. The board deemed that he should be repatriated to the UK on medical grounds, but the German authorities refused because he was still accused of treason. The next day he was moved to Oflag IV-C at Colditz Castle in Saxony. This was a high-security prison for PoWs who had repeatedly escaped from other camps. There he remained until the United States Army liberated the camp on 16 April 1945. Bryks was returned to RAF Cosford in England to recover from his captivity and Gestapo torture.

Brian Paddon

Sqn. Leader B. Paddon
After passing through the interrogation and transit camp of Dulag luft, he was first sent to Oflag IX-A/H at Spangenberg, before shortly afterwards leaving for Stalag Luft I at Barth, arriving there on 12 July 1940, where he became the Senior British Officer. After several escape attempts from various camps, he was sent to Oflag IV-C at Colditz Castle, arriving there on 14 May 1941 with three other officers, including Airey Neave. After several more attempts to escape, on 11 June 1942, he was sent to a court-martial at Stalag XX-A for insulting a German officer during one of his previous escape attempts.

John C. Morgan

John "Red" MorganJohn Cary "Red" Morgan
On March 6, 1944, Morgan was the pilot of a B-17 leading the first major USAAF attack against Berlin when he was shot down and captured, held in Stalag Luft I, Barth, Germany, for the remainder of the war, the only person to become a POW after being awarded the Medal of Honor. In 1948 Sy Bartlett and Beirne Lay, Jr. published their novel Twelve O'Clock High and used Morgan as a model for a primary character, Lt. Jesse Bishop. The wording of his actions appearing in his citation was used as dialogue in the script to describe the actions of Bishop under similar circumstances, and like Morgan, Bishop's character was awarded the Medal of Honor and later became a POW.

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
Germany (Deutschland, ), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland, ), is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north and the Alps, Lake Constance, and the High Rhine to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands to the west.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from more than 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources.

Western Pomerania

VorpommernWest PomeraniaHither Pomerania
Major cities and towns in Vorpommern include Stralsund, Greifswald, Bergen auf Rügen, Demmin, Anklam, Wolgast, Sassnitz and Barth. Heringsdorf does not have city rights, but is a semi-urban center. With Polish entry into the European Union and the opening of borders, Stettin has resumed its place as a dominant city for southern and eastern parts of the region. You can sort the table of the 20 largest towns by clicking one of the upper columns. Popular tourist resorts can be found all along the Baltic beaches of the Fischland-Darß-Zingst peninsula and the islands of Hiddensee, Rügen and Usedom.

Hubert Zemke

Hubert "Hub" ZemkeHubert A. Zemke
He became Senior Allied Officer of Stalag Luft I at Barth, on December 16, 1944, in command of the 7,000 Allied prisoners of "Provisional Wing X". Conditions were deplorable: insufficient food, inadequate clothing and medical attention, a lack of military discipline among some POWs, and indifferent or hostile German officials. Zemke established his leadership of the POWs, who numbered 9,000 by the end of the war. Gradually he developed working relations with the German camp commandant and staff and achieved some improvements in living conditions.

Bob Hoover

Robert A. "Bob" HooverRobert A. Hoover1st Lieutenant Robert A. "Bob" Hoover
He spent 16 months at the German prison camp Stalag Luft 1 in Barth, Germany. After a staged fight covered his escape from the prison camp, Hoover managed to steal an Fw 190 from a recovery unit's unguarded field — the one flyable plane being kept there for spare parts — and flew to safety in the Netherlands. He was assigned to flight-test duty at Wilbur Wright Field after the war. There he impressed and befriended Chuck Yeager. When Yeager was later asked whom he wanted for flight crew for the supersonic Bell X-1 flight, he named Hoover. Hoover became Yeager's backup pilot in the Bell X-1 program and flew chase for Yeager in a Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star during the Mach 1 flight.

Malmstrom Air Force Base

Malmstrom AFBGreat Falls Army Air BaseGreat Falls Air Force Base
Colonel Malmstrom, shot down on his 58th combat fighter mission in World War II, became the US commander of Luftwaffe Stalag Luft 1 South Compound, at Barth, Germany. After his release and return to active Air Force service, he died in the crash of a T-33 Shooting Star trainer on 21 August 1954 near Great Falls Air Force Base. In the short period of his tenure as vice wing commander, Colonel Malmstrom endeared himself to the local community. Saddened by the loss, the people of Great Falls began a drive to rename the base after him. Great Falls (later Malmstrom AFB) played a major aerial defense role in North American air defense mission.

Vermont Garrison

Captured almost immediately, he was subjected to two weeks of interrogations, then shipped to Stalag Luft I, the German Prisoner-of-war camp near Barth, Germany. Liberated on May 1, 1945, by Soviet troops, Garrison elected to rejoin his squadron rather than return to the United States. He remained with the 336th FS until it was inactivated in September 1945, then transferred to the 406th Fighter Group on occupation duty in Germany. In 1946 he transferred to the 56th Fighter Group at Selfridge Field, Michigan, where he again flew P-47s.

May 1

1 May11st of May
Their children are also killed by having cyanide pills inserted into their mouths by their mother, Magda. 1945 – World War II: Forces of the Soviet Red Army liberate Allied prisoners of war imprisoned at Stalag Luft I near Barth, Germany. 1945 – World War II: Up to 2,500 people die in a mass suicide in Demmin following the advance of the Red Army. 1945 – World War II: Yugoslav Partisans liberate Trieste. 1946 – Start of three-year Pilbara strike of Indigenous Australians. 1946 – The Paris Peace Conference concludes that the islands of the Dodecanese should be returned to Greece by Italy. 1947 – Portella della Ginestra massacre against May Day celebrations

Red Cross parcel

Red Cross ParcelsparcelsRed Cross Food Parcels
A list of the contents of a typical Red Cross parcel received by an American airman held prisoner in Stalag Luft I near Barth, Germany on the Baltic Sea: According to this airman, recipients of these parcels were permitted to keep only the cigarettes and chocolate bars; the remainder of the parcel was turned over to the camp cook, who combined them with the contents of other parcels and German PoW rations (usually bread, barley, potatoes, cabbage and horse meat) to create daily meals for the prisoners. Cigarettes in the parcels became the preferred medium of exchange within the camp, with each individual cigarette valued at 27 cents within Stalag Luft I.

Harry Burton (RAF officer)

Harry Burton
He escaped from Stalag Luft I (Barth, Germany), making his way to neutral Sweden before being returned to Scotland, and is believed to be the first British POW escapee of WWII to have successfully made it back home; later in the war he was appointed Officer Commanding No. 242 Squadron and then No. 238 Squadron. After the war he was seconded to the Indian Air Force before becoming Group Captain responsible for Organisation at Headquarters RAF Bomber Command in 1958 and then Station Commander at RAF Scampton in 1960.

Edgar Humphreys

Humphreys, Edgar S.
Humphreys was allocated Prisoner of War No. 406 and held at Stalag Luft I Barth. On 19 July 1941 he was promoted to flying officer, and exactly one year later he was promoted again to flight lieutenant. At Stalag Luft I Humphreys met Roger Bushell during various tunnelling escape attempts, Bushell later masterminded the Great Escape. Humphreys, Jack Grisman, Leslie George Bull and several other prisoners were part of the group with Bushell who were sent to Stalag Luft III in the province of Lower Silesia near the town of Sagan (now Żagań in Poland).

Neville McGarr

Clement A. Neville McGarrMcGarr, Clement A. N.
After three days walking through the desert without food or water he was captured by soldiers of the Afrika Korps and after only a few days in a prison camp in Libya was sent to Germany where he was held at Stalag Luft I Barth before being transferred to Stalag Luft III where he was an immediate volunteer for tunneling although his physical size made him unsuitable and he was asked to supervise the security teams maintaining a watch against German checks which might otherwise discover the tunnels. McGarr was one of the 76 men who escaped the prison camp on the night of 24–25 March 1944, in the escape now famous as "the Great Escape".

John Ward (RAF officer)

John WardJohn Ward (airman)
He was at Stalag Luft I near Barth, Western Pomerania in December 1940 before being moved to an unnamed labour camp in Upper Silesia in January 1941. At the end of March 1941 he was sent to a labour camp near Lissa in Poland. On 17 April 1941, Ward was with a working party of twenty prisoners supervised by two German soldiers when he hid, changed into civilian clothes and escaped. At Gostyn he was arrested in the railway marshalling yards and taken to the police station where he escaped through a window at night. In six days Ward travelled to Sieradz where he was directed to the local Roman Catholic priest who provided an introduction to the Polish Home Army.

Tom Leigh (RAF officer)

Tom LeighLeigh, Tom
Leigh was captured at about 07:00 hours that morning near Worms and after processing and interrogation at Dulag Luft at Oberusel, was allocated Prisoner of War No. 63 at Stalag Luft I, in Barth. At Stalag Luft I he met Roger Bushell during various escape attempts, Bushell later masterminded the Great Escape. Leigh, Edgar Humphreys, Jack Grisman, Leslie George Bull and several other prisoners were part of the group with Bushell who were sent to Stalag Luft III in the province of Lower Silesia near the town of Sagan (now Żagań in Poland). On 2 August 1942, Leigh was promoted to flying officer, and exactly one year later he was promoted again to flight lieutenant.

Leslie George Bull

Bull, Leslie G. "JohnnyJohnny Bull
Becoming a prisoner of war he was interrogated by the Luftwaffe before being sent to Stalag Luft I Barth as prisoner of war No. 667 where he made himself a general nuisance to the German guards (a popular pastime amongst bored RAF prisoners) and there he brewed illegal potato skin alcohol for Christmas celebrations. At Stalag Luft I Bull met Roger Bushell during various tunnelling escape attempts, Bushell later masterminded the Great Escape. Bull was part of the group with Bushell who were sent to Stalag Luft III in the province of Lower Silesia near the town of Sagan (now Żagań in Poland). He had no fear of enclosed spaces and was an enthusiastic tunneller.

Valdemar Aguirre Cordova

He subsequently spent 18 months in Stalag Luft I near Barth, Germany. After being liberated and discharged from the army, Cordova received a Juris Doctor from the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona in 1950. He was in private practice in Phoenix from 1950 to 1965. He was a superior court judge in Maricopa County, Arizona from 1965 to 1967, and from 1976 to 1979, returning in the interim to private practice in Phoenix. On April 30, 1979, Cordova was nominated by President Jimmy Carter to a new seat on the United States District Court for the District of Arizona created by 92 Stat. 1629.

Brian Evans (RAF officer)

Brian EvansEvans, Brian H.
He arrived at prison camp Stalag Luft I Barth where on 4 May 1941 he was promoted flying officer and was later moved to Stalag Luft III in the province of Lower Silesia near the town of Sagan (now Żagań in Poland). On 4 May 1942 Evans was promoted flight lieutenant For the Great Escape operation Evans was a regular tunneller and earned a favourable early position in the line of the two hundred men hoping to escape through the tunnel. As such he was one of the 76 men who escaped the prison camp on the night of 24–25 March 1944, in the escape now famous as "the Great Escape".

Jack Grisman

Grisman, William J.
Becoming a prisoner of war he was interrogated by the Luftwaffe before being sent to Stalag Luft I Barth where he and Bull immediately became involved in escape attempts involving tunnelling out of the camp where he made himself a general nuisance to the German guards (a popular pastime amongst bored RAF prisoners) and there he brewed illegal potato skin alcohol for Christmas celebrations. At Stalag Luft I Bull met Roger Bushell during various tunnelling escape attempts, Bushell later masterminded the Great Escape. Grisman and Bull were part of the group with Bushell who were sent to Stalag Luft III in the province of Lower Silesia near the town of Sagan (now Żagań in Poland).