Lloyd George ministry

coalition governmentCoalitionLloyd George Coalition Government
Lord Milner – Secretary of State for the Colonies. Winston Churchill – Secretary of State for War and Air. Edwin Samuel Montagu – Secretary of State for India. Walter Hume Long – First Lord of the Admiralty. Sir Albert Stanley – President of the Board of Trade. Robert Munro – Secretary for Scotland. James Ian Macpherson – Chief Secretary for Ireland. Lord French – Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. Christopher Addison – President of the Local Government Board. Rowland Edmund Prothero – President of the Board of Agriculture. Herbert Fisher – President of the Board of Education. Lord Inverforth – Minister of Munitions. Sir Robert Horne – Minister of Labour.

Unionist government, 1895–1905

CoalitionSalisbury (III & IV)Conservative administration
Conservative leader Lord Salisbury was appointed Prime Minister and his nephew, Arthur Balfour, became Leader of the House of Commons, but various major posts went to the Liberal Unionists, most notably the Leader of the House of Lords, the Liberal Unionist Duke of Devonshire, who was made Lord President, and his colleague in the Commons, Joseph Chamberlain, who became Colonial Secretary. It was this government which would conduct the Second Boer War from 1899-1902, which was exploited by the government to help win a landslide victory at the 1900 general election.

George Robinson, 1st Marquess of Ripon

Lord RiponThe Marquess of RiponMarquess of Ripon
In Gladstone's 1886 government he was First Lord of the Admiralty, and in the government of 1892 to 1895 he was Secretary of State for the Colonies. When the Liberals again returned to power in 1905 under Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, he took office, aged 78, as Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords. In 1908, he declined to remain as Lords leader when H. H. Asquith became Prime Minister in April, and he resigned as Lord Privy Seal in October. As noted by Neil Smith, Ripon’s liberalism had roots in the mid-nineteenth century, but his political views “shifted with the times.”

Asquith coalition ministry

Asquith Coalitioncoalition governmentCoalition
Liberal Prime Minister H. H. Asquith formed a wartime coalition government in May 1915. The change of ministry resulted from intense attacks on the Liberal government claiming it had badly mishandled the war effort, especially regarding the Gallipoli Campaign against Constantinople and the Shell Crisis regarding shortage of ammunition on the Western Front.

Leader of the House of Lords

Deputy Leader of the House of LordsLeaderLeaders of the House of Lords
When the Prime Minister sat in the Commons, the position of Leader of the Lords was often held by the Foreign Secretary or Colonial Secretary. In some coalition governments, it was held by the party leader who was not Prime Minister. Since the end of the Marquess of Salisbury's last government, in 1902, the position clearly exists in its own right as a member of the cabinet. Since 1966 it has only been combined with sinecure positions and the holder has not been a departmental minister though some have held additional responsibilities such as Quintin Hogg, 2nd Viscount Hailsham also being designated "Minister for Science" or Margaret Baroness Jay also being "Minister for Women".

List of office holders of the United Kingdom and predecessor states

List of rulers of the United Kingdom and predecessor statesBritish rulersBritish ruler
Secretary of State for the Colonies (1768–1782; 1794–1801; 1854–1966). Secretary of State for India (1858–1947). Secretary of State for the Southern Department (1660–1782). Secretary of State for the Northern Department (1660–1782). Secretary of State for the Home Department (1782–present). Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (1782–1968). Secretary of State for War (1794–1801; 1854–1964). Secretary of State for War and the Colonies (1801–1854). Secretary of State for Air (1918–1964). Secretary of State for Defence (1964–present). Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs (1925–1947). Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations (1947–1966).

List of ministers in Churchill wartime government (1940–1945)

This article presents a list of the ministers who served in Winston's Churchill government during World War II from May 1940 until May 1945. Members of the War Cabinet are in bold face.

Secretary of State (United Kingdom)

Secretary of StateSecretaries of StateBritish Secretary of State
Office the First Lord of the Admiralty (1690–1964; merged into Defence). Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (1782–1968; merged into Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs). Secretary of State for the Colonies (1768–1782 and 1854–1966; merged into Commonwealth Affairs). Secretary of State for War (1794–1801 and 1854–1964; merged into Defence). Secretary of State for War and the Colonies (1801–1854; divided). Secretary of State for India (1858–1947; from 1935 known as India and Burma). Secretary of State for Air (1918–1964; merged into Defence). Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs (1925–1947; merged into Commonwealth Relations).

A. V. Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Hillsborough

A. V. AlexanderA.V. AlexanderEarl Alexander of Hillsborough
He was three times First Lord of the Admiralty, including during the Second World War, and then Minister of Defence under Clement Attlee. Born in Weston-super-Mare and one of four children, A. V. Alexander was the son of Albert Alexander, a blacksmith and later engineer who had moved from his native Wiltshire to Bristol during the agricultural depression of the 1860s and 1870s, and Eliza Jane Thatcher, daughter of a policeman. He was named after both his father and Prince Albert Victor, Queen Victoria's eldest grandson, but he was known as "A. V." from a young age.

Malcolm MacDonald

The Right Honourable '''Malcolm MacDonaldGovernor-General Malcolm MacDonaldMacDonald
MacDonald held his seat in the 1931 general election as a National Labour candidate, and continued to build up a reputation as a highly competent minister. When his father retired in 1935, the new Prime Minister, Stanley Baldwin, appointed Malcolm to the Cabinet for the first time as Secretary of State for the Colonies. His father had become Lord President of the Council and they became only the third father and son to sit together in the same Cabinet.

Oliver Stanley

Hon. Oliver Stanley The Right Honourable '''Oliver StanleyHon.Oliver Stanley
Two years later Stanley's political fortunes revived when Churchill appointed him Secretary of State for the Colonies, a post which he held until the end of the war. After the Conservatives' massive defeat in the 1945 general election Stanley was prominent amongst those rebuilding the party and he came to be regarded as one of the most important Conservative MPs. He was a governor of The Peckham Experiment in 1949. He succeeded his father as Chancellor of the University of Liverpool. By this time, however, his health was in decline; and he died on 10 December 1950 at his home in Sulhamstead.

Duncan Sandys

Duncan Edwin Sandys The Right Honourable '''Duncan SandysCelia Sandys
Conservative Government. 31 October 1951 – 18 October 1954, Minister of Supply. 18 October 1954 – 13 January 1957, Minister of Housing and Local Government. 13 January 1957 – 14 October 1959, Minister of Defence. 14 October 1959 – 27 July 1960, Minister of Aviation. 27 July 1960 – 13 July 1962, Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations. 13 July 1962 – 16 October 1964, Secretary of State for the Colonies and Commonwealth Relations. men' in sex scandal finally named – The Guardian, Thursday 10 August 2000. Obituary, New York Times 7 November 1987. http://www.europanostra.org/history/. http://www.europanostra.org/history/.

Ministry of Defence (1947–64)

Ministry of DefenceParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of DefenceParliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Defence
Secretary of State for Defence. Ministry of Defence (United Kingdom).

Liberal government, 1859–1866

Palmerston IISecond Palmerston ministryLiberal administrations
The Duke of Newcastle – Secretary of State for the Colonies. Sidney Herbert – Secretary of State for War. Sir Charles Wood – Secretary of State for India. The Duke of Somerset – First Lord of the Admiralty. William Ewart Gladstone – Chancellor of the Exchequer. Edward Cardwell – Chief Secretary for Ireland. Thomas Milner Gibson – President of the Board of Trade and of the Poor Law Board. Sir George Grey – Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Lord Elgin – Postmaster-General. July 1859 – Charles Pelham Villiers succeeds Milner-Gibson as President of the Poor Law Board (Milner-Gibson remains at the Board of Trade). May 1860 – Lord Stanley of Alderley succeeds Lord Elgin as Postmaster-General.

Second Derby–Disraeli ministry

Derby–Disraeli IISecond Derby ministrygovernment
The Conservative government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland that began in 1858 and ended in 1859 was led by Lord Derby in the House of Lords and Benjamin Disraeli in the House of Commons.

Second Disraeli ministry

Conservative administrationDisraeli IIsecond government
August 1877: George Ward Hunt dies and is succeeded as First Lord of the Admiralty by William Henry Smith. Sir Michael Hicks-Beach, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, enters the cabinet. February 1878: Sir Michael Hicks-Beach succeeds the Earl of Carnarvon as Colonial Secretary. Hicks-Beach's successor as Chief Secretary for Ireland is not in the cabinet. April 1878: The Duke of Northumberland succeeds Beaconsfield as Lord Privy Seal; the latter remains First Lord of the Treasury. The Marquess of Salisbury succeeds the Earl of Derby as Foreign Secretary. The Viscount Cranbrook succeeds Salisbury at the India Office. Sir Frederick Stanley succeeds Cranbrook at the War Office.

First Gladstone ministry

Gladstone ILiberal administrationfirst administration
Lord Kimberley succeeds Granville as Colonial Secretary, and Lord Halifax succeeds Kimberley as Lord Privy Seal. W.E. Forster enters the Cabinet as Vice President of the Council. January 1871: Chichester Fortescue succeeds Bright at the Board of Trade. Lord Hartington succeeds Fortescue as Chief Secretary for Ireland. Hartington's successor as Postmaster-General is not in the Cabinet. March 1871: G.J. Goschen succeeds Childers at the Admiralty. James Stansfeld succeeds Goschen at the Poor Law Board (which becomes the Local Government Board later that year). August 1872: Hugh Childers returns to the Cabinet as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

Second Gladstone ministry

Gladstone IIsecond administrationLiberal administration
The Earl of Kimberley served as both Colonial Secretary and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster between July and December 1882. The Lord Carlingford served as both Lord Privy Seal and Lord President between March 1883 and March 1885. May 1881: The Lord Carlingford succeeds the Duke of Argyll as Lord Privy Seal. April 1882: The Earl Spencer becomes Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, but retains his seat in the cabinet and his position as Lord President. May 1882: William Edward Forster resigns as Chief Secretary for Ireland. His successor is not in the cabinet. July 1882: The Earl of Kimberley succeeds John Bright as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster remaining also Colonial Secretary.

Third Derby–Disraeli ministry

Derby–Disraeli IIIConservative administrationsecond administration
The Conservative government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland that began in 1866 and ended in 1868 was led by Lord Derby in the House of Lords and Benjamin Disraeli in the House of Commons.

Liberal government, 1892–1895

Gladstone IVLiberal administrationLiberal administrations
In the 1892 general election, the Conservative Party, led by the Marquess of Salisbury, won the most seats but not an overall majority. As a result, William Ewart Gladstone's Liberal Party formed a minority government that relied upon Irish Nationalist support. On 3 March 1894, Gladstone resigned over the rejection of his Home Rule Bill and the Earl of Rosebery succeeded him.

First Palmerston ministry

Palmerston Ifirst administrationfirst government
Lord John Russell succeeds Herbert as Colonial Secretary. Sir Charles Wood succeeds Sir James Graham as First Lord of the Admiralty. R.V. Smith succeeds Wood as President of the Board of Control. July 1855 – Sir William Molesworth succeeds Russell as Colonial Secretary. Molesworth's successor as First Commissioner of Public Works is not in the Cabinet. November 1855 – Henry Labouchere succeeds Molesworth as Colonial Secretary. December 1855 – The Duke of Argyll succeeds Lord Canning as Postmaster-General. Lord Harrowby succeeds Argyll as Lord Privy Seal. Harrowby's successor as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is not in the Cabinet. 1857 – M.T.

Samuel Hoare, 1st Viscount Templewood

Samuel HoareSir Samuel HoareSir Samuel Hoare, Bt
In 1936 he returned to the Cabinet as First Lord of the Admiralty, then served as Home Secretary from 1937 to 1939 and was again briefly Secretary of State for Air in 1940. He was seen as a leading "appeaser" and his removal from office (along with that of Sir John Simon and the removal of Neville Chamberlain as Prime Minister) was a condition of Labour's agreement to serve in a coalition government in May 1940. He was British ambassador to Spain from 1940 to 1944. Hoare was born in London on 24 February 1880, the eldest son of Sir Samuel Hoare, 1st Baronet, who was a Conservative MP from a by-election in 1886 until 1906, and to whose baronetcy he succeeded in 1915.

Third Gladstone ministry

Gladstone IIIthird administration1886 administration
Former Foreign Secretary Lord Granville became Secretary of State for the Colonies, while another political veteran, Lord Kimberley, resumed the post of Secretary of State for India which he had held from 1882 to 1885. The influential Joseph Chamberlain was appointed President of the Local Government Board while future party leader and Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman was made Secretary of State for War. The government also saw John Morley hold his first ministerial post as Chief Secretary for Ireland. The ministry is chiefly remembered for Gladstone's first attempt to introduce the Home Rule Bill for Ireland.

Liberal government, 1905–1915

Liberal governmentLiberal administrationCampbell-Bannerman
The Earl of Elgin – Secretary of State for the Colonies. Richard Haldane – Secretary of State for War. John Morley – Secretary of State for India. The Lord Tweedmouth – First Lord of the Admiralty. David Lloyd George – President of the Board of Trade. Sir Henry Fowler – Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Sir John Sinclair – Secretary for Scotland. James Bryce – Chief Secretary for Ireland. John Burns – President of the Local Government Board. The Earl Carrington – President of the Board of Agriculture. Augustine Birrell – President of the Board of Education. Sydney Buxton – Postmaster-General. January 1907 – Augustine Birrell succeeds Bryce as Irish Secretary.

Conservative government, 1922–1924

LawConservative administrationsConservative Government
The Duke of Devonshire – Secretary of State for the Colonies. Lord Derby – Secretary of State for War. Lord Peel – Secretary of State for India. Sir Samuel Hoare – Secretary of State for Air. Lord Novar – Secretary for Scotland. Leo Amery – First Lord of the Admiralty. Sir Philip Lloyd-Greame – President of the Board of Trade. Sir Robert Sanders – Minister of Agriculture. Edward Frederick Lindley Wood – President of the Board of Education. Sir Anderson Barlow – Minister of Labour. Neville Chamberlain – Minister of Health. Sir William Joynson-Hicks – Financial Secretary to the Treasury. Sir Laming Worthington-Evans – Postmaster-General.