Milhouse Van Houten

MilhouseHouseboy
According to Arden Myrin and Dana Gould (former writer and co-executive producer of The Simpsons), Rob Cohen (Simpsons writer) inspired Milhouse's look. The Milhouse File. Milhouse Van Houten on IMDb. Milhouse Van Houten on Simpsons Wiki.

Edna Krabappel

Mrs. KrabappelEdnaTeacher
Tilda Swinton modeled her hairdo in the film Burn After Reading on Krabappel's. * Edna Krabappel on IMDb de:Figuren aus Die Simpsons#Edna Krabappel

Moe Szyslak

MoeMoe's TavernMoe Syszlak
Morris "Moe" Szyslak is a recurring character from the animated television series The Simpsons. He is voiced by Hank Azaria and first appeared in the series premiere episode "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire". Moe is the proprietor and bartender of Moe's Tavern, a Springfield bar frequented by Homer Simpson, Barney Gumble, Lenny Leonard, Carl Carlson, Sam, Larry, and others. Grouchy, lonely, miserable and prone to violent outbursts, Moe is constantly down on his luck, and has attempted suicide numerous times. Other running jokes featuring him include being prank called by Bart Simpson, running illegal activities from his bar, and an ambiguous ethnic origin.

Krusty the Clown

KrustyKrusty the KlownHerschel Krustofski
In The Simpsons Ride, a simulator ride opened at Universal Studios Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood in May 2008, Krusty builds and opens a cartoon theme park called Krustyland. Sideshow Bob makes an appearance and tries to murder the Simpson family. In July 2007, convenience store chain 7-Eleven converted eleven of its stores in the United States and one in Canada into Kwik-E-Marts to celebrate the release of The Simpsons Movie. Amongst the products sold were "Krusty-O's", which were made by Malt-O-Meal. ;Bibliography * * Krusty the Clown on IMDb de:Figuren aus Die Simpsons#Krusty, der Clown (Herschel Krustofski)

I Married Marge

conceivedhe was the reason they got married in the first placeI Married Marge," Season 3, Episode 12
"I Married Marge" is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons third season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on December 26, 1991. In the episode, Marge worries that she may yet again be pregnant and drives to Dr. Hibbert's office. While anxiously waiting, Homer begins to tell Bart, Lisa, and Maggie the story of how he and Marge got married and how Bart was born. Written by Jeff Martin and directed by Jeffrey Lynch, "I Married Marge" was the second flashback episode of The Simpsons after season two's "The Way We Was". It features cultural references to The Empire Strikes Back, Charlie's Angels, and Ms. Pac-Man.

Nelson Muntz

NelsonCrunch
Nelson Muntz is a fictional character and the lead school bully from the animated television series The Simpsons, best known for his signature mocking laugh "Ha-ha!". He is voiced by Nancy Cartwright and was introduced in Season 1's "Bart the General" as an antagonist but later became a close friend of Bart Simpson. Nelson is a 12 year old student and bully at Springfield Elementary School. He is known to have terrorized virtually every kid in Springfield at one point or another. Most often, however, it is the school nerds and less popular students, such as Milhouse and Martin, who are the subject of his cruelty.

And Maggie Makes Three

"And Maggie Makes Three" is the thirteenth episode of The Simpsons sixth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on January 22, 1995. In the episode, Homer recounts the story of Maggie's birth when the kids ask why there are no photos of her in the family album. The episode was written by Jennifer Crittenden, and directed by Swinton O. Scott III. This was both Crittenden and Scott's first episode on The Simpsons. It features cultural references to television series such as The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Knight Rider.

Kent Brockman

I for one welcome our new computer overlordsOverlord memeoverlords
. * Media in The Simpsons ;Bibliography *(həd) pe : Song I.F.O.. * Kent Brockman on IMDb (həd) pe : Song I.F.O..

Fox Broadcasting Company

FoxFox networkFox.com
By the 1997–98 season, Fox had three shows in the Nielsen Top 20, The X-Files (which ranked 11th), King of the Hill (which ranked 15th) and The Simpsons (which ranked 18th). Building around its flagship animated comedy The Simpsons, Fox would experience relative success with animated series in prime time, beginning with the debut of the Mike Judge-produced King of the Hill in 1997. Family Guy (the first of three adult-oriented animated series from Seth MacFarlane to air on the network) and Futurama (from Simpsons creator Matt Groening) would make their debuts in 1999; however, they were canceled in 2002 and 2003 respectively.

Snoopy, Come Home

Snoopy Come HomeNo Dogs AllowedIt Changes
Lynda Mendelson as Frieda. Chris De Faria as Peppermint Patty. Cinema Center Films Presents. A Lee Mendelson-Bill Melendez Production. © 1972 Lee Mendelson Film Productions, Inc. and Sopwith Productions, Inc. All Rights Reserved. "Snoopy, Come Home". Created and Written by: Charles M. Schulz. Starring: Snoopy with Charlie Brown, Lucy Van Pelt, Linus Van Pelt, Schroeder, Peppermint Patty, Sally, and introducing Woodstock. Music and Lyrics by: Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. Music Arranged and Conducted by: Oliver Wallace. Executive Producer: Charles M. Schulz. Produced by: Lee Mendelson and Bill Melendez. © 1972 All Rights Reserved. Directed by: Bill Melendez.

Mayor Quimby

Joe QuimbyQuimbyDiamond Joe Quimby
During the USA Today contest to choose which Springfield would host the release of The Simpsons Movie, Ted Kennedy himself appears in a video in which he invited "Diamond Joe" Quimby and the film to premiere in Springfield, Massachusetts, and even mocked his own oft-mocked pronunciation of the word "Chowder" (as "Chow-Dah"); however, Springfield, Vermont was chosen instead. * Politics in The Simpsons Profile of Mayor Quimby from SimpsonsWorld.com. Mayor Quimbi on IMDb.

Treehouse of Horror

Halloween episodeTreehouse of Horror (series)Treehouse of Horror'' episodes
List of The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episodes.

James L. Brooks

James BrooksJim BrooksJim
He hired cartoonist Matt Groening to create a series of shorts for the show, which eventually led to The Simpsons in 1989. The Simpsons won numerous awards and is still running. Brooks also co-produced and co-wrote the 2007 film adaptation of the show, The Simpsons Movie. In total, Brooks has received 53 Emmy nominations, winning 21 of them. James Lawrence Brooks was born on May 9, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York, United States, and raised in North Bergen, New Jersey. His parents, Dorothy Helen (née Sheinheit) and Edward M. Brooks, were both salespeople (his mother sold children's clothes; his father furniture).

Some Enchanted Evening (The Simpsons)

Some Enchanted EveningMs. Botzfirst episode
Botz, ranked on AOL's list of their favorite 25 Simpsons guest stars. ;Bibliography * * cs:Simpsonovi (první série)#Hezkej večer "Some Enchanted Evening" at The Simpsons.com.

Life in Hell

Akbar and JeffAkbar & JeffBinky (Life in Hell)
These also appear in Simpsons annuals.

Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire

Christmas HomerHomer dressing up as Santa Clausinaugural episode
The special was the subject of the series' first home video release, The Simpsons Christmas Special, released on VHS in 1991. The episode was also included in The Simpsons – Christmas (later retitled Christmas with The Simpsons), a DVD compilation of the series' Christmas episodes, produced in 2003. The episode was also included on The Simpsons season one DVD set, which was released on September 25, 2001. Groening, Brooks, and Silverman participated in the DVD's audio commentary. ;Bibliography * * "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" at The Simpsons.com.

Josh Weinstein

Homer Simpson", "The Principal and the Pauper" and "Lisa the Simpson". "The Principal and the Pauper" was negatively received due the sudden revelation that long-time character Seymour Skinner was actually an imposter. For example, in his book Planet Simpson, Chris Turner describes "The Principal and the Pauper" as the "broadcast that marked [the] abrupt plunge" from The Simpsons "Golden Age", which he says began in the middle of the show's third season. He calls the episode "[one of] the weakest episodes in Simpsons history". As such, they consider it the most controversial episode from their tenure as executive producers.

Al Jean

Jean believes this is one of the reasons that many fans and critics regard season three and four as the best seasons of The Simpsons. Bill Oakley, another writer on The Simpsons, has commented that "Mike and Al are responsible for the best thing that ever appeared on television, which was the third season of The Simpsons." Comedy writer Jay Kogen has said that "those years with Al Jean and Mike Reiss running it were pretty darn good. And then the ones after that maybe not so much. Some people ran it better than others."

Bill Oakley

Rachel Pulido
Homer Simpson", "The Principal and the Pauper" and "Lisa the Simpson". "The Principal and the Pauper" was negatively received due the sudden revelation that long-time character Seymour Skinner was actually an imposter. For example, in his book Planet Simpson, Chris Turner describes "The Principal and the Pauper" as the "broadcast that marked [the] abrupt plunge" from The Simpsons "Golden Age", which he says began in the middle of the show's third season. He calls the episode "[one of] the weakest episodes in Simpsons history". As such, Oakley considers it the most controversial episode from his tenure as executive producer.

List of longest-running U.S. primetime television series

longest-runningfifth longest-running U.S. primetime television seriesList of long-running prime time series
This is a list of the longest running U.S. primetime television series, ordered by the number of broadcast seasons offered by a U.S. broadcast network or cable network in prime time on the show's original run. Broadcast syndication that could have been scheduled by local stations in prime time have been omitted.

Tracey Ullman

Tracy UllmanUllmanUllman, Tracey
Godatu" and "The Simpsons." The Simpsons would go on to be spun off into its own television series. By the time The Tracey Ullman Show ended in 1990, the show was awarded ten Emmy Awards; Ullman winning three, one in the category of Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program in 1990. The show not only scored the Fox network its first Emmy nomination, but also earned it its first-ever Emmy win. After four seasons, Ullman decided to end the show in May 1990. In 1991, she filed a lawsuit against Twentieth Century Fox in Los Angeles Superior Court over profits from the later half-hour incarnation of The Simpsons.

Sam Simon

the co-creator
Former Simpsons director Brad Bird has described him as "the unsung hero" of the show, while Vitti has stated to "leave out Sam Simon" is to tell "the managed version" of The Simpsons history, because "he was the guy we wrote for." Writer Ken Levine called Simon "the real creative force behind The Simpsons ... The tone, the storytelling, the level of humor—that was all developed on Sam's watch." Levine says that Simon "brought a level of honesty to the characters" and made them "three-dimensional," adding that his "comedy is all about character, not just a string of gags. In The Simpsons, the characters are motivated by their emotions and their foibles. 'What are they thinking?'

Mike Reiss

Jean believes this is one of the reasons that many fans regard season three and four as the best seasons of The Simpsons. Sam Simon has stated "The Simpsons wouldn't have been The Simpsons without [Reiss]." Reiss has won four Primetime Emmy Awards for his work on the show. They left after season four to create The Critic, an animated show about film critic Jay Sherman (voiced by Jon Lovitz); the show was executive produced by The Simpsons co-developer James L. Brooks. It was first broadcast on ABC in January 1994 and was well received by critics, but did not catch on with viewers and was put on hiatus after six weeks. It returned in June 1994 and completed airing its initial production run.

John Swartzwelder

SwartzwelderFrank BurlyHow I Conquered Your Planet
(born February 8, 1949) is an American comedy writer and novelist, best known for his work on the animated television series The Simpsons. Born in Seattle, Washington, Swartzwelder began his career working in advertising. He was later hired to work on comedy series Saturday Night Live in the mid-1980s as a writer. He later contributed to fellow writer George Meyer's short-lived Army Man magazine, which led him to join the original writing team of The Simpsons, beginning in 1989. He worked on The Simpsons as a writer and producer until 2003, and later contributed to The Simpsons Movie.