Divided government in the United States

United States Presidents and control of Congresscontrolcontrol of
Bush were accompanied by control of at least one house of Congress. Divided government. Government trifecta#United States. Party divisions of United States Congresses. Political power in the United States over time. Political party strength in U.S. states. Ansolabehere, S., Palmer, M., & Schneer, B. (2018). Divided Government and Significant Legislation: A History of Congress from 1789 to 2010. Social Science History, 42(1), 81-108. Morris Fiorina, Divided Government, 1996. David R. Mayhew, Divided We Govern, 1991.

United States midterm election

Midterm electionsmidterm electionmid-term elections
Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Donald Trump) has the President's party gained seats in the House or the Senate and of those only two (1934 Franklin Roosevelt and 2002 George Bush) have seen the President's party gain seats in both houses. 1 Party shading shows which party controls chamber after that election. *

United States Secretary of the Interior

Secretary of the InteriorU.S. Secretary of the InteriorInterior Secretary
The United States secretary of the interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior. The Department of the Interior in the United States is responsible for the management and conservation of most federal land and natural resources; it oversees such agencies as the Bureau of Land Management, the United States Geological Survey, and the National Park Service. The secretary also serves on and appoints the private citizens on the National Park Foundation board. The secretary is a member of the president's Cabinet. The U.S. Department of the Interior should not be confused with the Ministries of the Interior as used in many other countries.

United States Deputy Attorney General

Deputy Attorney GeneralDeputy Attorney General of the United StatesU.S. Deputy Attorney General
The United States Deputy Attorney General is the second highest-ranking official in the United States Department of Justice and oversees the day-to-day operation of the Department. The Deputy Attorney General acts as Attorney General during the absence of the Attorney General.

2016 United States presidential election

20162016 presidential election2016 U.S. presidential election
Data scientist Hamdan Azhar noted the paradoxes of the 2016 outcome, saying that "chief among them [was] the discrepancy between the popular vote, which Hillary Clinton won by 2.8 million votes, and the electoral college, where Trump won 304-227". He said Trump outperformed Mitt Romney's 2012 results, while Clinton only just matched Barack Obama's 2012 totals. Hamdan also said Trump was "the highest vote earner of any Republican candidate ever," exceeding George W. Bush's 62.04 million votes in 2004, though neither reached Clinton's 65.9 million, nor Obama's 69.5 million votes in 2008, the overall record.

Central Intelligence Agency

CIAC.I.A.Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
In his address to the nation at 8:30pm on September 11, 2001, George W. Bush mentioned the intelligence community: "The search is underway for those who are behind these evil acts, I've directed the full resource of our intelligence and law enforcement communities to find those responsible and bring them to justice." The involvement of the CIA in the newly coined "War on Terror" was further increased on September 15, 2001. During a meeting at Camp David George W. Bush agreed to adopt a plan proposed by CIA director George Tenet. This plan consisted of conducting a covert war in which CIA paramilitary officers would cooperate with anti-Taliban guerillas inside Afghanistan.

Cuba

Republic of CubaCubanCUB
In 1996, the United States, then under President Bill Clinton, brought in the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity Act, better known as the Helms–Burton Act. In 2009, United States President Barack Obama stated on 17 April, in Trinidad and Tobago that "the United States seeks a new beginning with Cuba", and reversed the Bush Administration's prohibition on travel and remittances by Cuban-Americans from the United States to Cuba. Five years later, an agreement between the United States and Cuba, popularly called "The Cuban Thaw", brokered in part by Canada and Pope Francis, began the process of restoring international relations between the two countries.

Guantanamo Bay detention camp

Guantanamo BayGuantanamo Bay detainment campGuantanamo
The camp was established by President George W. Bush's administration in 2002 during the War on Terror. His successor, President Barack Obama, promised that he would close it, but met strong bipartisan opposition from Congress, which passed laws to prohibit detainees from Guantanamo being imprisoned in the U.S. During Obama's administration, the number of inmates was reduced from about 245 to 41; most former detainees were freed and transferred to other countries. In January 2018, President Donald Trump signed an executive order to keep the detention camp open indefinitely. In May 2018, the first prisoner was transferred during Trump's term; this reduced the number of inmates to 40.

List of federal political scandals in the United States

American political scandalsAmerican political scandalpolitical scandal
The sentence was commuted by George W. Bush on July 1, 2007. The felony remains on Libby's record, though the jail time and fine were commuted. President Donald Trump fully pardoned Libby on April 13, 2018. Alphonso Jackson, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, resigned while under investigation by the Justice Department for alleged cronyism and favoritism. Karl Rove, Senior Adviser to President George W. Bush, was investigated by the Office of Special Counsel for "improper political influence over government decision-making", as well as for his involvement in several other scandals such as Lawyergate, Bush White House email controversy and Plame affair.

Ted Cruz

CruzSenator Ted Cruz[
At the firm, Cruz worked on matters relating to the National Rifle Association and helped prepare testimony for the impeachment proceedings against President Bill Clinton. In 1998, Cruz was briefly one of the attorneys who represented Representative John Boehner during his litigation against Representative Jim McDermott over the alleged leak of an illegal recording of a phone conversation whose participants included Boehner. Cruz joined the George W. Bush presidential campaign in 1999 as a domestic policy adviser, advising then-Governor Bush on a wide range of policy and legal matters, including civil justice, criminal justice, constitutional law, immigration, and government reform.

Bashar al-Assad

Bashar AssadAssadBashar Al Assad
After the election of Donald Trump, the priority of the United States concerning Assad was unlike the priority of the Obama administration, and in March 2017 United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley stated the U.S. was no longer focused on "getting Assad out", but this position changed in the wake of the 2017 Khan Shaykhun chemical attack. Following the missile strikes on a Syrian airbase on the orders of President Trump, Assad's spokesperson described the United States' behaviour as "unjust and arrogant aggression" and stated that the missile strikes "do not change the deep policies" of the Syrian government.

United States order of precedence

order of precedence
. * 1) President of the United States (Donald Trump). 2) Vice President of the United States (Mike Pence). 3) Governor (in their respective states). 4) Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (Nancy Pelosi). 5) Chief Justice of the United States (John Roberts). 6) Former presidents or their widows/widowers (ordered by term):. 7) Jimmy Carter (January 20, 1977 – January 20, 1981). 8) Bill Clinton (January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001). 9) George W.

List of United States presidential candidates by number of votes received

Following is a list of United States presidential candidates by number of votes received. Elections have tended to have more participation in each successive election, due to the increasing population of the United States, and, in some instances, expansion of the right to vote to larger segments of society. Prior to the election of 1824, most states did not have a popular vote. In the election of 1824, only 18 of the 24 states held a popular vote, but by the election of 1828, 22 of the 24 states held a popular vote. Minor candidates are excluded if they received fewer than 100,000 votes, or less than .1% of the vote in their election year.

United States presidential elections in New Hampshire

New Hampshire
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in New Hampshire, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1788, New Hampshire has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential elections in Maryland

Marylandprimary and general presidential elections in Maryland
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Maryland, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1788, Maryland has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential elections in New Jersey

New Jersey
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in New Jersey, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1787, New Jersey has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential elections in New York

New York
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in New York, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1788, New York has participated in every U.S. presidential election except the election of 1788-89, when it failed to appoint its allotment of eight electors because of a deadlock in the state legislature.

United States presidential elections in Delaware

Delaware
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Delaware, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1787, Delaware has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential elections in Massachusetts

Massachusetts
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Massachusetts, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1788, Massachusetts has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential elections in Connecticut

Connecticut
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Connecticut, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1788, Connecticut has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential elections in Rhode Island

Rhode Island
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Rhode Island, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1790, Rhode Island has participated in every U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential elections in Kentucky

Kentucky
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Kentucky, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1792, Kentucky has participated in every U.S. presidential election. Prior to the election of 1792, Kentucky was part of Virginia, and residents of the area voted as part of that state.

United States presidential elections in Tennessee

Tennessee
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Tennessee, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1796, Tennessee has participated in every U.S. presidential election except the election of 1864, during the American Civil War. At that time, Tennessee was controlled by the Union and held elections, but electors were not ultimately counted.

List of presidents of the United States by military service

The United States Constitution names the President of the United States the commander in chief of the U.S. armed forces. Previous service in the military is not a prerequisite for the position of president., no member of the U.S. Marine Corps or U.S. Coast Guard has yet been elected President. The most frequent military experience is Army/Army Reserve with 15 presidents, followed by State Militias at 9, Navy/Naval Reserve at 6 and the Continental Army with 2 presidents serving.

United States presidential elections in Vermont

Vermontin Vermontthat of Vermont
Following is a table of United States presidential elections in Vermont, ordered by year. Since its admission to statehood in 1791, Vermont has participated in every U.S. presidential election.