James Edward Sullivan

James E. SullivanJames SullivanSullivan, James
His ostensible reason was to conduct research on "purposeful dehydration," even though dehydration is potentially fatal. The marathon ended with the worst ratio of entrants to finishers (14 of 32) and by far the slowest winning time, 3:28:45, almost 30 minutes slower than the second fastest winning time. He also organized the Anthropology Days. The 1912 Summer Olympics allowed female divers and swimmers, but the United States Olympic Committee's Mr. Sullivan barred American women from participating even though there were capable women willing to participate. In 1911 he was injured in a train wreck in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

1908 Summer Olympics

19081908 Olympics1908 London
Olympic team as members of the Irish American Athletic Club. Members of the Irish American Athletic Club won ten of the U.S. Olympic team's total 23 gold medals, or as many as the nations of France, Germany and Italy combined. These are the top ten nations that won medals at the 1908 Games. Since Finland was part of the Russian Empire, members of the Finnish team were expected to march under the Russian rather than Finnish flag, so many chose to march without a flag at all. The Swedish flag had not been displayed above the stadium, so the members of the Swedish team decided not to take part in the ceremony. 1948 Summer Olympics and 2012 Summer Olympics - which were also held in London.

James Sullivan (athlete)

James P. SullivanJames Sullivan
James Patrick Sullivan (June 29, 1885 – April 9, 1965) was an American middle-distance runner and member of the Irish American Athletic Club. He competed in the 1906 Intercalated Games in Athens and the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. He was known as "4:22 Jim" for being the first native-born American to run the mile in the fast time of 4 minutes and 22 seconds at the Metropolitan Championships held at Travers Island in 1905. He had been regarded as a promising walker in school, but was advised by a school coach to concentrate on running. In the 1906 Intercalated Games he finished fifth in the 1500 m competition.

Jim Thorpe

Mauch ChunkThorpeThorpe, Jim
Apart from his track and field appearances, he also played in one of two exhibition baseball games at the 1912 Olympics, which featured two teams composed mostly of U.S. track and field athletes. Thorpe had previous experience in the sport, as the public would soon learn. After his victories at the Olympic Games in Sweden, on September 2, 1912, he returned to Celtic Park, the home of the Irish American Athletic Club, in Queens, New York (where he had qualified four months earlier for the Olympic Games), to compete in the Amateur Athletic Union's All-Around Championship. Competing against Bruno Brodd of the Irish American Athletic Club and John L.

George Bonhag

George Valentine Bonhag (January 31, 1882 – October 30, 1960) was an American athlete and a member of the Irish American Athletic Club and the New York City Police Department. He competed in distance events, both racewalking and running, at the 1904, 1908 and 1912 Olympics and at the 1906 Intercalated Games. An announcement in the August 6, 1904 issue of The New York Times indicated that the Metropolitan Association of the Amateur Athletic Union would hold a "special five-mile race" at Celtic Park on August 13, 1904 with the eight top finishers receiving a paid trip to compete in the marathon at the Olympic Games in St. Louis on August 30, 1904.

John Eller

John Jacob Eller
(October 15, 1883 – January 20, 1967) was an American track and field athlete, a member of the Irish American Athletic Club and a member of the New York City Police Department from 1905 to 1942. Eller was a five-time Amateur Athletic Union champion in the 220 yard low hurdles between 1907 and 1912. He competed as a member of the U.S. Olympic team in the 1912 Summer Olympics. (John's brother Robert Eller was also an athlete, who competed for Fordham University and the Irish American Athletic Club. In 1910, Eller was considered 'King of the Hurdlers.'

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Since the Civil War, only one third-party presidential candidate—former president Theodore Roosevelt, running as a Progressive in 1912—has won as much as 20% of the popular vote. The president and vice president are elected through the Electoral College system. In American political culture, the center-right Republican Party is considered "conservative" and the center-left Democratic Party is considered "liberal". The states of the Northeast and West Coast and some of the Great Lakes states, known as "blue states", are relatively liberal. The "red states" of the South and parts of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains are relatively conservative.

Emil Muller (athlete)

Emil Muller
Emil Joseph Muller (February 19, 1891 – February 25, 1958) was an American track and field athlete and a member of the Irish American Athletic Club who competed in the discus throwing events in the 1912 Summer Olympics. Muller was the Amateur Athletic Union discus champion 1912-14 and 1918. He was also a member of the New York City Police Department. In the 1912 Summer Olympics he finished sixth in the two handed discus throw competition, just behind fellow Irish American Athletic Club member and US Olympic team mate James Duncan, who won the bronze medal in the one-handed discus throw that year. Muller also participated in the discus throw event and finished twelfth.

Dan Ahearn

Dan Ahearne
Dan Ahearn (né Daniel William Ahearne; April 12, 1888 – December 20, 1942) was an Irish and later American track and field athlete and a member of the Irish American Athletic Club. He competed for the U.S. Olympic team in the 1920 Summer Olympics. He was born in Athea, Ireland and was the younger brother of Tim Ahearne. Ahearn immigrated with his family to the United States in 1909 where the "e" from Ahearne was dropped. He was not naturalized before 1912 because he was not allowed to compete in the 1912 Summer Olympics when he did not hold the U.S. citizenship. He won the National Amateur Athletic Union junior broad jump championship in 1908.

Johnny Hayes

John Hayes
John Joseph "Johnny" Hayes (April 10, 1886 – August 25, 1965) was an American athlete, a member of the Irish American Athletic Club, and winner of the marathon race at the 1908 Summer Olympics. Hayes' Olympic victory contributed to the early growth of long-distance running and marathoning in the United States. He was also the first man to win a marathon at the now official standard distance of 26 miles 385 yards when Olympic officials lengthened the distance to put the finish line in front of the Royal Box (the 1896 and 1904 Olympic marathons had been less than 25 miles long). Born in New York City to a family of Irish emigrants (from Nenagh in Co.

Mel Sheppard

Melvin SheppardSheppard, Mel
At the Amateur Athletic Union metropolitan championships held at Travers Island in 1909, Sheppard was part of the Irish American Athletic Club's four-man relay team that broke the world's record for the one mile relay, with a time of 3 minutes 20 2/5 seconds. The other three men on the record breaking team were; C.S. Cassara, William Robbins and James Rosenberger. His 1910 trading card called him "undoubtedly the greatest mid-distance runner the world has ever seen." After winning Amateur Athletic Union titles at 880 yd in 1911 and 1912, Sheppard was a favourite to defend his Olympic 800 metres title at the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm.

James Rosenberger

On April 9, 1911, Rosenberger anchored the Irish American Athletic Club 4×440 yard relay team that broke the world record at Celtic Park, Queens, New York, and set the first IAAF- recognized world record for 4×440 yard or 4×400 meter relay race, in time of 3 minutes and 18.2 seconds. The other members of the world record setting team were Harry Gissing, Mel Sheppard and Harry Schaaf. Rosenberger participated in the 1912 Summer Olympics, but was eliminated in a 400 m semifinal. Next year he competed in Australia with the AAU team, and in 1915 he became the coach for the Long Island Athletic Club. * Archives of Irish America – NYU. Winged Fist Organization.

Egon Erickson

Erickson (July 4, 1888 – January 20, 1973) was an American track and field athlete, a member of the Mott Haven Athletic Club, the Irish American Athletic Club and the New York City Police Department from 1911 until his retirement in 1939. At the time of his retirement, Erickson was attached to the Detective Bureau. Erickson competed in the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm, Sweden, in the high jump, tying with Jim Thorpe for the fourth place. He won the AAU title in 1909 (outdoor) and 1912 (indoor) and finished third in 1913 and 1916. List of American athletes. Winged Fist Organization.

Bruno Brodd

He competed for the Irish American Athletic Club and the Kaleva Athletic Club. Competing for the Irish American Athletic Club, Brodd contributed to the club’s victory at the 1910 AAU national championship in New Orleans, by breaking the American record for the javelin throw with a distance of 163 feet, 1 inch. In 1912, he competed against the famous Native American champion athlete Jim Thorpe twice. The first time was at the 1912 Olympic pentathlon tryouts held at the Irish American Athletic Club’s stadium, Celtic Park in Queens, New York, on May 18.

Olympic Games

OlympicOlympicsOlympian
The 1912 Olympic pentathlon and decathlon champion Jim Thorpe was stripped of his medals when it was discovered that he had played semi-professional baseball before the Olympics. His medals were posthumously restored by the IOC in 1983 on compassionate grounds. Swiss and Austrian skiers boycotted the 1936 Winter Olympics in support of their skiing teachers, who were not allowed to compete because they earned money with their sport and were thus considered professionals. As class structure evolved through the 20th century, the definition of the amateur athlete as an aristocratic gentleman became outdated.

Simon Gillis

He was one of a group of athletes known as the Irish Whales and frequently kept company with members of the Irish American Athletic Club. He competed in weight throwing events in the 1904, 1908 and 1912 Summer Olympics. He was born on Cape Breton Island, Canada, but moved to New York as a teenager to join his brother. In 1904, Gillis accidentally killed a boy when he was practicing his hammer throw in a vacant lot in Harlem.

Hannes Kolehmainen

Hannes
Kolehmainen competed for a number of years in the United States, wearing the Winged Fist of the Irish American Athletic Club. He also enlisted in the 14th Regiment of the National Guard of New York, and became a U.S. citizen in 1921. Kolehmainen, a devoted vegetarian and bricklayer by trade, was from a sportive family from Kuopio – his brothers William and Tatu were also strong long distance runners. Tatu competed in two Olympics and finished 10th in the Marathon in 1920. Hannes was one of the stars of the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, winning three gold medals. His most memorable was the one in the 5000 m. In that event, he ran a heroic duel with Frenchman Jean Bouin.

Stockholm

Stockholm, SwedenStockholm Citycity of Stockholm
Historically, the city was the host of the 1912 Summer Olympics. From those days stem the Stockholms Olympiastadion which has since hosted numerous sports events, notably football and athletics. Other major sport arenas are Friends Arena the new national football stadium, Stockholm Globe Arena, a multi-sport arena and one of the largest spherical buildings in the world and the nearby indoor arena Hovet. Besides the 1912 Summer Olympics, Stockholm hosted the 1956 Summer Olympics Equestrian Games and the UEFA Euro 1992. The city was also second runner up in the 2004 Summer Olympics bids. Stockholm hosted the 1958 FIFA World Cup.

Alvah Meyer

He was a Jewish member of the Irish American Athletic Club, which also included Abel Kiviat and Myer Prinstein. Meyer underperformed at the 1912 Olympic Trials and was only included to the US Olympic team on the condition that he pays his travel, which was eventually covered by his parents. He won the silver medal in the 100 meters, but was eliminated in the semi-finals of the 200 m event. In 1914 he set a world record at 60 yards, and in 1915 he set a world record at 330 yards. *List of select Jewish track and field athletes *

1920 Summer Olympics

19201920 Antwerp1920 Olympics
New Zealand, which had competed as part of a combined team with Australia in 1908 and 1912, competed on its own for the first time. * The Dominion of Newfoundland had one competitor, Eric Robertson. But as the dominion had no official Olympic committee, his nationality could not be confirmed and he represented Great Britain. As the local Olympic Organizing Committee went bankrupt during the Antwerp 1920 Games, no official report of the Games was ever produced. The documents of the Games were archived at the Belgium Olympic Committee headquarters in Brussels.

Robert Cloughen

In 1910, Cloughen broke the world's record for the 110 yard dash at the Tailtin Games held at Celtic Park, Queens, New York, with a time of 10.8 seconds. "Cloughen jumped into the lead at the start of the 110-yard dash, and led all the way winning by two yards from John Eller in the remarkably fast time of 0:10 4–5. Billy Keating, another of Lawson Robertson's team (the Irish American Athletic Club), finished a close third." In 1922, Cloughen was named track coach at the University of Vermont. From Vermont he returned to New York as track coach at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn from 1926 to 1930.

Tom Collins (athlete)

Tom Collins
He competed for the Xavier Athletic Club and the Irish American Athletic Club. In 1906, Collins won the Amateur Athletic Union junior National cross country championships. In 1908, in what The New York Times called "the greatest battle for athletic supremacy in the history of indoor track and field sports," Collins broke the world's record for the 5 mile distance at the indoor National championships of the A.A.U., held at Madison Square Garden, with a time of 25 minutes and 19.4 seconds. He lowered the record set by E.C. Carter of 25 minutes 23.6 seconds, which was set in 1887, and had stood for 21 years.

Harvey Cohn

Harvey Wright Cohn (December 4, 1884 – July 29, 1965) was an American track and field athlete and a member of the Irish American Athletic Club. A native of New York City, Cohn competed in the 1904 Summer Olympics, the 1906 Intercalated Games in Athens and 1908 Summer Olympics in London. An announcement in the August 6, 1904 issue of The New York Times indicated that the Metropolitan Association of the Amateur Athletic Union would hold a "special five-mile race" at Celtic Park on August 13, 1904 with the eight top finishers receiving a paid trip to compete in the marathon at the Olympic Games in St. Louis on August 30, 1904.

Abel Kiviat

Kiviat, Abel
He competed for and coached the Irish American Athletic Club, and was later a member of the New York Athletic Club. Kiviat was born to Zelda and Morris (sometimes written as Milton or Moshe) Kiviat. He was raised on Staten Island and attended Curtis High School. He joined the Irish American Athletic Club in New York City and started training in 1908. In 1908 at Travers Island, he won the Junior Championship for one mile for the Metropolitan District, making the fast time of 4:24. In the same year he won the Baxter Cup in the Columbia University races at Madison Square Garden, making the fast time of 4:23 2–5.

Donald Lippincott

He competed for the United States in the 1912 Summer Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden where he finished third in the 100 m and second in the 200 m. Lippincott was the first record holder over 100 meters as recognised by the IAAF (then the International Amateur Athletics Federation, now known as the International Association of Athletics Federations). He set the world record in a heat of 100 m at the 1912 Olympics. Lippincott was a scion of a wealthy Philadelphia family., the son of Alfonse Fithian Lippincott (1855-1925). He was a pupil at the Episcopal Academy, before attending the University of Pennsylvania. Lippincott was a successful student athlete at the University of Pennsylvania.