Concatenation

concatenatedconcatenateconcatenating
In formal language theory and computer programming, string concatenation is the operation of joining character strings end-to-end. For example, the concatenation of "snow" and "ball" is "snowball". In some but not all formalisations of concatenation theory, also called string theory, string concatenation is a primitive notion.

Object-relational mapping

ORMobject-relational mapperobject relational mapping
Object-relational mapping (ORM, O/RM, and O/R mapping tool) in computer science is a programming technique for converting data between incompatible type systems using object-oriented programming languages. This creates, in effect, a "virtual object database" that can be used from within the programming language. There are both free and commercial packages available that perform object-relational mapping, although some programmers opt to construct their own ORM tools.

C (programming language)

CC programming languageC language
C (, as in the general-purpose, imperative computer programming language, supporting structured programming, lexical variable scope and recursion, while a static type system prevents many unintended operations. By design, C provides constructs that map efficiently to typical machine instructions, and therefore it has found lasting use in applications that had formerly been coded in assembly language, including operating systems, as well as various application software for computers ranging from supercomputers to embedded systems.

Medium (website)

MediumMedium.com36 Chapters
Medium is an online publishing platform developed by Evan Williams, and launched in August 2012. It is owned by A Medium Corporation. The platform is an example of social journalism, having a hybrid collection of amateur and professional people and publications, or exclusive blogs or publishers on Medium, and is regularly regarded as a blog host.

C standard library

libcstandard librarystandard C library
The C standard library or libc is the standard library for the C programming language, as specified in the ANSI C standard. It was developed at the same time as the C library POSIX specification, which is a superset of it. Since ANSI C was adopted by the International Organization for Standardization, the C standard library is also called the ISO C library.

Flaming (Internet)

flame warflame warsflaming
Flaming is the online act of posting insults, often laced with profanity or other offensive language on social networking sites. These insults may turn into flame wars where two or more individuals unite to exchange or unite against a third party with verbal attacks. Many attribute the emergence of flaming to the anonymity that internet forums provide. Anonymity can lead to disinhibition, which results in the swearing, offensive and hostile language characteristic of flaming.

Open-source license

open sourceopen-sourceopen source license
An open-source license is a type of license for computer software and other products that allows the source code, blueprint or design to be used, modified and/or shared under defined terms and conditions. This allows end users and commercial companies to review and modify the source code, blueprint or design for their own customization, curiosity or troubleshooting needs. Open-source licensed software is mostly available free of charge, though this does not necessarily have to be the case. Licenses which only permit non-commercial redistribution or modification of the source code for personal use only are generally not considered as open-source licenses.

Scope (computer science)

scopelexical scopescoping
In computer programming, the scope of a name binding – an association of a name to an entity, such as a variable – is the region of a computer program where the binding is valid: where the name can be used to refer to the entity. Such a region is referred to as a scope block. In other parts of the program the name may refer to a different entity (it may have a different binding), or to nothing at all (it may be unbound).

Tech companies in the New York metropolitan area

computer industry
Tech companies in the New York City metropolitan area represent a significant and growing economic component of the New York metropolitan area, the most populous combined statistical area in the United States and one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. In the region's Silicon Alley, new establishments include those of Israeli companies in New York City, at a rate of ten new startups per month. Below is a partial and growing list of notable New York metropolitan area tech and start-up companies:

Bulletin board system

BBSbulletin board systemsbulletin board
A bulletin board system or BBS (also called Computer Bulletin Board Service, CBBS ) is a computer server running software that allows users to connect to the system using a terminal program. Once logged in, the user can perform functions such as uploading and downloading software and data, reading news and bulletins, and exchanging messages with other users through public message boards and sometimes via direct chatting. In the middle to late 1980s, message aggregators and bulk store-and-forward'ers sprung up to provide services such as FidoNet, which is similar to email.

Rosetta Code

The Rosetta Code comparative programming tasks project site
Rosetta Code is a wiki-based programming chrestomathy website with implementations of common algorithms and solutions to various programming problems in many different programming languages.

New Zealanders

New ZealandNew ZealanderKiwi
New Zealanders, colloquially known as Kiwis, are people associated with New Zealand, sharing a common history, culture, and language (New Zealand English). People of various ethnicities and national origins are citizens of New Zealand, governed by its nationality law.

Keyboard technology

mechanical keyboardkeyboardskeypad
Computer keyboards can be classified by the switch technology that they use. Computer alphanumeric keyboards typically have 80 to 110 durable switches, generally one for each key. The choice of switch technology affects key response (the positive feedback that a key has been pressed) and pre travel (the distance needed to push the key to enter a character reliably). Newer keyboard models use hybrids of various technologies to achieve greater cost savings.

Creative Commons license

CC-By-SACreative CommonsCreative Commons Attribution License
A Creative Commons (CC) license is one of several public copyright licenses that enable the free distribution of an otherwise copyrighted "work". A CC license is used when an author wants to give other people the right to share, use, and build upon a work that he or she (that author) has created. CC provides an author flexibility (for example, he or she might choose to allow only non-commercial uses of a given work) and protects the people who use or redistribute an author's work from concerns of copyright infringement as long as they abide by the conditions that are specified in the license by which the author distributes the work.

List of eponymous laws

eponymous lawAdageseponymous laws
This list of eponymous laws provides links to articles on laws, principles, adages, and other succinct observations or predictions named after a person. In some cases the person named has coined the law – such as Parkinson's law. In others, the work or publications of the individual have led to the law being so named – as is the case with Moore's law. There are also laws ascribed to individuals by others, such as Murphy's law; or given eponymous names despite the absence of the named person.

Rust (programming language)

RustRust programming languageCargo
Rust was the "most loved programming language" in the Stack Overflow Developer Survey for 2016, 2017, and 2018. Rust is intended to be a language for highly concurrent and highly safe systems, and "programming in the large", that is, creating and maintaining boundaries that preserve large-system integrity. This has led to a feature set with an emphasis on safety, control of memory layout, and concurrency. Performance of idiomatic Rust is comparable to the performance of idiomatic C++. The concrete syntax of Rust is similar to C and C++, with blocks of code delimited by curly brackets, and control flow keywords such as,,, and.

Leaky abstraction

leaky
The term "leaky abstraction" was popularized in 2002 by Joel Spolsky. An earlier paper by Kiczales describes some of the issues with imperfect abstractions and presents a potential solution to the problem by allowing for the customization of the abstraction itself. As coined by Spolsky, the Law of Leaky Abstractions states: All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky. This statement highlights a particularly problematic cause of software defects: the reliance of the software developer on an abstraction's infallibility.

Blook

The first printed blook was User Interface Design for Programmers, by Joel Spolsky, published by Apress on June 26, 2001, based on his blog Joel on Software. An early blook was written by Tony Pierce in 2002 when he compiled selected posts from his one-year-old blog and turned the collection into a book called "Blook". The name came about when Pierce held a contest, asking his readers to suggest a title for the book. Jeff Jarvis of BuzzMachine won the contest and subsequently invented the term. Pierce went on to publish two other blooks, How To Blog and Stiff. Print-on-demand publisher Lulu inaugurated the Lulu Blooker Prize for blooks, which was first awarded in 2006.

Vim (text editor)

VimVim text editorgvim
In 2006, it was voted the most popular editor amongst Linux Journal readers; in 2015 the Stack Overflow developer survey found it to be the third most popular text editor, and the fifth most popular development environment in 2018. Bram Moolenaar began working on Vim for the Amiga computer in 1988. Moolenaar first publicly released Vim (v1.14) in 1991. Vim was based on an earlier editor, Stevie, for the Atari ST, created by Tim Thompson, Tony Andrews, and G.R. (Fred) Walter. The name "Vim" is an acronym for "Vi IMproved" because Vim is an extended version of the vi editor, with many additional features designed to be helpful in editing program source code.

Notepad++

Notepad++ (compare)
In 2015 Stack Overflow conducted a worldwide Developer Survey, and Notepad++ was voted as the most used text editor worldwide with 34.7% of the 26,086 respondents claiming to use it daily. Stack Overflow noted that "The more things change, the more likely it is those things are written in JavaScript with NotePad++ on a Windows machine". The 2016 survey had NotePad++ at 35.6%. In 2015, in response to the staff hijacking of projects hosted on Sourceforge, Notepad++ left Sourceforge completely with the forums being moved to NodeBB and the bug tracker to GitHub. Notepad++ is a source code editor.