Executive agency

executive agenciesState AgenciesUnited Kingdom government agency
Contains a list of agencies. (PDF). Civil Service (from the UK Government Web Archive).

Swindon

Swindon, EnglandSwindon, WiltshireEven Swindon
There are numerous places of worship in Swindon, some of which are listed buildings. Until 1845, the only church in Swindon was the Holy Rood Church, a Grade II listed building. That year, St Mark's Church was built. In 1851, Christ Church was built. Later in the year, the first Roman Catholic chapel was opened in the town and was also named Holy Rood. In 1866, Cambria Baptist Chapel was built. In the 1880s, Bath Road Methodist Chapel was built. In 1885, St Barnabas Church was built. In 1907, St Augustine's Church in Even Swindon was built. Various churches and places of worship were built in the town by other denominations and faiths.

Grade II* listed war memorials in England

A war memorial listed at grade II* may be of particular artistic interest or accomplishment, of a highly unusual design, or of significant historical interest below that required for grade I. It is explicitly unnecessary for the architect or sculptor to be well known in order for a memorial to be listed at grade II*. As part of the commemorations of the centenary of the First World War, Historic England—the government body responsible for listing in England—is running a project with the aim of significantly increasing the number of war memorials on the National Heritage List for England. This list includes only memorials that are grade II* listed buildings in their own right.

Scheduled monuments in Greater London

Scheduled monuments—sometimes referred to as scheduled ancient monuments—can also be protected through listed building procedures, and Historic England considers listed building status to be a better way of protecting buildings and standing structures. A scheduled monument that is later determined to "no longer merit scheduling" can be descheduled.

List of sites on the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens

This list of sites on the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens is a list of parks and gardens in England featured on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of special historic interest in England. The list is managed by Historic England (formerly English Heritage), and currently includes about 1,600 sites. As with listed buildings, parks and gardens are graded on a scale: Grade I being internationally significant sites; these are therefore the most important and constitute around 10% of the total number. Historically important gardens are Grade II* (about 30% of the total), and the remainder are of regional or national importance and are Grade II registered.

Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester

Grade I listed buildingGrade I listedGrade I listed buildings
Grade II listed buildings in Manchester. Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester. List of tallest buildings in Manchester. Scheduled Monuments in Greater Manchester.

Listed buildings in Accrington

It contains 41 listed buildings, which are designated by Historic England and recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, two are listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II. Until the arrival of industry in the later part of the 18th century the area was rural, containing only small settlements. Most of the older listed buildings are, or originated as, farmhouses or farm buildings. There is one surviving industrial building, a former engineering workshop, that has been listed. Many of the other listed buildings are associated with the development of a substantial town, and with its road and rail links.

Grade II listed buildings in Southampton: M–O

The Historic England database is the official listing and includes a description of the property, the reasons for designation, the date of listing and an extract from the Ordnance Survey map at a scale of 1:2500 pinpointing the exact location of the building. The British Listed Buildings database also includes the details of the property from the Historic England database, together with links to Google/street view, Ordnance Survey and Bing maps/birds eye view. Southampton City Council: Historic Environment Record – Listed Buildings in Southampton. British Listed BuildingsListed Buildings in Southampton.

Willesden Jewish Cemetery

Willesden United Synagogue CemeteryJewish CemeteryUnited Synagogue, Willesden
In 2017 Historic England listed the cemetery at Grade II on the grounds of: its being the first venture of the United Synagogue; its having associations with many influential families and individuals who are buried there; its overall design by a prominent Jewish architect; "the quality, opulence and variety displayed by the monuments as a group, reflecting both Jewish traditions and English influences"; and its survival – "the Old Cemetery remains intact, whilst the subsequent evolution of the cemetery is well-documented and legible". The cemetery, which has 29,800 graves, has many significant memorials and monuments.

Bristol Old Vic

Theatre Royal, BristolTheatre RoyalBristol Old Vic Theatre
Together, they are designated a Grade I listed building by Historic England. Daniel Day-Lewis called it "the most beautiful theatre in England." In 2012 the theatre complex completed the first phase of a £19 million refurbishment, increasing the seating capacity and providing up to ten flexible performance spaces. Besides the main Theatre Royal auditorium, the complex includes the Studio theatre and the Side Stage, Paint Shop and Basement performance areas. Whilst the theatre was closed, the company continued to present work in the Studio and Basement spaces, as well as at other sites around Bristol. The Theatre Royal re-opened in 2012 with Wild Oats.

List of current places of worship on the Isle of Wight

Historic England, the body responsible for listed buildings and other heritage assets in England, also publishes an annual "Heritage at Risk Register"—a survey of assets at risk through decay, damage and similar issues.

St Mary Redcliffe

St. Mary RedcliffeSt Mary Redcliffe, BristolRedcliffe
Grade I listed buildings in Bristol. List of tallest buildings and structures in Bristol. Official site. St Mary's Redcliffe Parish Church – dimensions and plans.

Grade I listed churches in Cumbria

Cumbria
Buildings in England are given listed building status by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, acting on the recommendation of Historic England. Listed status gives the structure national recognition and protection against alteration or demolition without authorisation. Grade I listed buildings are defined as being of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; only 2.5 per cent of listed buildings are included in this grade. There have been Christian churches in Cumbria since the Anglo-Saxon era. Anglo-Saxon elements to be found in the churches include the lower parts of the towers of St Michael, Beetham, and St Laurence, Morland.

Norris Castle

The Castle is a Grade I listed building. In October 2016, the parks and gardens at Norris Castle were also upgraded by Historic England to Grade I, making them the Isle of Wight's only Grade I listed landscape. This change in status was achieved as a result of the new owners working in partnership with Historic England. The landscape at Norris Castle is thought to have been designed in 1799 by Humphry Repton, one of England’s greatest landscape designers, and it includes one of the best examples of a castellated walled garden anywhere in England. Despite its grandeur, the castle's condition has suffered dramatically over recent years, with the huge cost of trying to keep it maintained.

Grade I listed churches in Cheshire

Cheshire
In England, buildings are given listed building status by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, acting on the recommendation of Historic England. This gives the structure national recognition and protection against alteration or demolition without authorisation. Grade I listed buildings are defined as being of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; only 2.5 per cent of listed buildings are included in this grade. This is a complete list of Grade I listed churches and chapels in Cheshire as recorded in the National Heritage List for England.

Scheduled monuments in Maidstone

List of scheduled monuments in Maidstone
Grade I listed buildings in Maidstone. Grade II* listed buildings in Maidstone.

Parnham House

The house became a Grade I listed building on the National Heritage List for England in 1953. Its gardens were landscaped by Inigo Thomas, and were Grade II* listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens in 1986. In addition to the main house, the lodge, ice house, and kitchen garden walls are Grade II listed, and the front courtyard, south terrace walls and gazebos, and stable block are listed Grade II*. The house is used as the venue for the annual Eat Dorset Food Fair. In April 2017 the house was badly damaged by fire, the cause of which is currently undetermined. The entire interior and contents were lost.

List of places of worship in Waverley (borough)

As of February 2001, there were 21 Grade I-listed buildings, 92 with Grade II* status and 1,548 Grade II-listed buildings in the borough. Waverley is a largely rural district situated in the southwest of the county of Surrey. Its estimated population in 2013 was 122,400, a slight increase on the figure of 121,572 recorded in the United Kingdom Census 2011.

St Wilfrid's Church, Grappenhall

St Wilfrid's ChurchGrappenhallSt Wilfrid
It is designated by Historic England as a Grade I listed building. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Chester and the deanery of Great Budworth. The church is Norman in origin, built probably in the earlier part of the 12th century and completed about 1120. This was a small and simple church, consisting of a nave, chancel and, possibly, an apse. The foundations of this church were discovered during the 1873–74 restoration. A chantry chapel was added by the Boydell family in 1334 in a position where the south aisle now stands. From 1529 the church was largely rebuilt in local sandstone.

Owlpen Manor

Owlpen
It was designated by Historic England as a grade I listed building on 23 June 1952. The manor house is of medieval origins, incorporating fabric dated by dendrochronology to c. 1270. It was largely built and rebuilt in the Tudor period by the Daunt family between 1464 and 1616. Since then it has not seen significant development, except for some improvements early in the 18th century, when the east wing of the house, together with the gardens, church and Grist Mill, were reordered by Thomas Daunt IV between 1719 and 1726.

St Stephen's Church, Bristol

St Stephen's ChurchBristol — St Stephen's PriorySt Stephen
Grade I listed buildings in Bristol. Ramsay MacDonald, first Labour Party Prime Minister. St Stephen's Website. Pevsner Trust Architectural Guide.

Grade I listed buildings in Bristol

Grade I
Grade II* listed buildings in Bristol. Grade II listed buildings in Bristol.

List of places of worship in Eastbourne

EastbourneSt Mary's Church, Eastbourne
Historic England or its predecessor English Heritage have awarded listed status to several current and former church buildings in Eastbourne. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; Historic England, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues. There are three grades of listing status.