Jerry Goldsmith

Goldsmith
and Playhouse 90. He also scored multiple episodes of the television series The Twilight Zone. He remained at CBS until 1960, after which he moved on to Revue Studios and then to MGM Studios for producer Norman Felton, whom he had worked for during live television and would later compose music for such television shows as Dr. Kildare and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. His feature film debut occurred when he composed the music to the 1957 western Black Patch. He continued with scores to such films as the 1957 western Face of a Fugitive and the 1959 science fiction film City of Fear. Goldsmith began the decade composing for such television shows as Dr.

Paul Wendkos

Wendkos directed episodes of Playhouse 90 then did The Case Against Brooklyn (1958) for producer Charles Schneer at Columbia. He directed a TV movie for Columbia about Jesse James, Bitter Heritage (1958) and episodes of Behind Closed Doors (1958). Wendkos directed another for Schneer, the war movie Tarawa Beachhead (1958). He had a massive hit with the teen film Gidget (1959) starring Sandra Dee, Cliff Robertson and James Darren. Face of a Fugitive (1959) was a Western for Schneer, and Battle of the Coral Sea (1959) was a war movie with Robertson. Wendkos went back to TV for Five Fingers, Tightrope, Law of the Plainsman, Alcoa Theatre, Two Faces West, and Route 66.

Orson Bean

O. Bean
Orson Bean (born Dallas Frederick Burrows; July 22, 1928) is an American film, television, and stage actor, as well as a comedian, writer, and producer. He appeared frequently on televised game shows from the 1960s through the 1980s and was a long-time panelist on the television game show To Tell the Truth.

Lee Marvin

His 1970s films included Monte Walsh (1970), a Western with Palance and Jeanne Moreau; the violent Prime Cut (1972) with Gene Hackman; Pocket Money (1972) with Paul Newman, for Stuart Rosenberg; Emperor of the North (1973) opposite Ernest Borgnine for Aldrich; as Hickey in The Iceman Cometh (1973) with Fredric March and Robert Ryan, for John Frankenheimer; The Spikes Gang (1974) with Noah Beery Jr. for Richard Fleischer; The Klansman (1974) with Richard Burton; Shout at the Devil (1976), a World War One adventure with Roger Moore, directed by Peter Hunt; The Great Scout and Cathouse Thursday (1976), a comic Western with Oliver Reed; and Avalanche Express (1978), a Cold War thriller with Robert

James B. Clark (director)

James B. ClarkJames Clark
He directed an episode of Playhouse 90 (1957's "The Jet-Propelled Couch") and three episodes of Studio One in Hollywood in 1958. Studio One was nominated for an Emmy Award for Best Dramatic Anthology Series that year. Clark worked steadily in television throughout the 1960s. He directed four episodes of the ABC television network's Adventures in Paradise from 1961 to 1962, four episodes of ABC's The Legend of Jesse James from 1965 to 1966, six episodes of the ABC family drama The Monroes from 1966 to 1967, and four episodes of the CBS television series The Wild Wild West from 1967 to 1968.

Albert Heschong

Heschong won the 1957 Best Art Direction (One Hour or More) Emmy Award for the live television presentation of Requiem for a Heavyweight on the CBS anthology drama series Playhouse 90. * Art Directors Guild Hall of Fame * [https://interviews.televisionacademy.com/interviews/albert-heschong Albert Heschong Art Director – 3-hour interview. Television Academy Foundation.] Emmys.com list of 1957 Nominees & Winners. Emmys.com list of 1985 Nominees & Winners. Albert Heschong Art Director – 3-hour interview. Television Academy Foundation.

The Time of Your Life (film)

The Time of Your Life1948 filmfeature film
A Playhouse 90 television version ten years later starring Jackie Gleason as Joe earned critical acclaim, with Jack Klugman as Nick, Dick York as Tom, Betsy Palmer as Kitty, and James Barton reprising his role as Kit Carson. * *

Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directing – Feature Film

Feature FilmOutstanding Directing – Feature FilmOutstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures
The Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures is one of the annual Directors Guild of America Awards given by the Directors Guild of America. With 3 wins out of 11 nominations, Steven Spielberg is both the most awarded and most nominated director for this category in the history of DGA. Additionally, Alejandro G. Iñárritu is the only director to win consecutive awards. He was awarded in 2015 and 2016 for his directorial work in Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) and The Revenant, respectively.

Frank Silvera

Frank Alvin Silvera (July 24, 1914 – June 11, 1970) was a Jamaican-born American character actor and theatrical director.

Roy Scheider

Roy R. Scheider
Scheider was in The Men's Club (1986), 52 Pick-Up (1986) for John Frankenheimer, Cohen and Tate (1988), Listen to Me (1989), Night Game (1989), The Fourth War (1990) again for Frankenheimer, Somebody Has to Shoot the Picture (1990), and The Russia House (1991). One of his later parts was that of Dr. Benway in the long-in-production 1991 film adaptation of William S. Burroughs' novel Naked Lunch. In 1990 he co-starred with Sean Connery in The Russia House as the smart-talking CIA liaison with MI6.

Black Sunday (novel)

Black SundaynovelBlack Sunday'' (novel)
In 1977, a film was made based on the novel starring Robert Shaw and Bruce Dern and directed by John Frankenheimer.

Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directing – Miniseries or TV Film

Miniseries or TV FilmOutstanding Directing – Television FilmOutstanding Directing – Miniseries or TV Film
The Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Movies for Television and Limited Series is one of the annual Directors Guild of America Awards given by the Directors Guild of America. It was first awarded at the 24th Directors Guild of America Awards in 1972. The award was previously named the Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Miniseries or Movies for Television.

The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (film)

The St. Valentine's Day MassacreThe St Valentine's Day MassacreThe St. Valentine's Day Massacre'' (film)
Valentine's Day Massacre was not, as might be guessed, inspired by the 1959-63 ABC TV series, The Untouchables, but is one of many motion pictures adapted from a CBS Playhouse 90 episode; Seven Against The Wall, broadcast on Playhouse 90 in December 1958, was also written by Harold Browne and featured actors Milton Frome, Celia Lovsky and Frank Silvera in the same roles that they play in the film. To make certain the film would have the look of a gangster film, Roger Corman shot the film at the Desilu studios and used other sections of the back lot for different locales of Chicago.

Buick-Electra Playhouse

Hotchner, the producer was Gordon Duff, and the directors were John Frankenheimer, James Clarke, and Albert Marre. Notable guest stars included Richard Burton, Maximilian Schell, Eleanor Parker, Robert Ryan, Dean Stockwell and Diane Baker. * Buick-Electra Playhouse at CVTA Buick-Electra Playhouse at CVTA.

BMW

BMW GroupBMW AGBMW Customer Racing Teams
The directors for The Hire included Guy Ritchie, John Woo, John Frankenheimer and Ang Lee. In 2016, a ninth film in the series was released. The 2006 "BMW Performance Series" was a marketing event geared to attract black car buyers. It consisted of seven concerts by jazz musician Mike Phillips, and screenings of films by black filmmakers. BMW was the principal sponsor of the 1998 The Art of the Motorcycle exhibition at various Guggenheim museums, though the financial relationship between BMW and the Guggenheim Foundation was criticised in many quarters.

Alex Segal

Alex Segal (July 1, 1915 – August 22, 1977) was an American television director, television producer and film director.

Richard Stanley (director)

Richard StanleyRichard Stanley (film director)
He was fired and replaced by John Frankenheimer a week after shooting began. The details of Stanley's involvement in the film, which ultimately veered far from his original vision, are captured in the 2014 documentary Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley's Island of Dr. Moreau. Stanley completed The Secret Glory – an examination of SS officer Otto Rahn's search for the Holy Grail – in 2001 and The White Darkness – a look at the voodoo practices in Haiti – in 2002. Following several festival screenings, both documentaries appeared in the Dust Devil DVD box-set, released by Subversive Cinema in 2006. Stanley's recent cinematic efforts include a number of short films.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Television Movie

Outstanding Made for Television MovieOutstanding Television MovieOutstanding Drama/Comedy Special
This is a list of the winners of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Made for Television Movie, which is awarded since 1992. The category was originally called Outstanding Drama or Comedy Special.

Charley's Aunt

Charley’s AuntCharlie's AuntCharles' Aunt
In 1957, CBS television in the US aired a live production as part of the Playhouse 90 series, starring Art Carney as Babbs, and Orson Bean as Charley and Jeanette MacDonald as the real Donna Lucia. In the 1960s BBC Television broadcast three productions of the play. The first, in 1961 featured Bernard Cribbins as Babbs, Donald Wolfit as Spettigue and Rosalie Crutchley as Donna Lucia. Richard Briers played Babbs in a 1965 version, and a 1969 production starred Danny La Rue, Coral Browne and Ronnie Barker. A Soviet version was made for television in 1975, entitled Hello, I'm Your Aunt!.

Robert Stevens (director)

Robert Stevens
Robert Stevens (December 2, 1920 – August 7, 1989) was an American director and producer. He led on a career of producing and directing many television shows and movies for nearly 4 decades.

Elmore Leonard

Be CoolGold CoastLeonard, Elmore
Elmore John Leonard Jr. (October 11, 1925 – August 20, 2013) was an American novelist, short story writer, and screenwriter. His earliest novels, published in the 1950s, were Westerns, but he went on to specialize in crime fiction and suspense thrillers, many of which have been adapted into motion pictures.

Charles Marquis Warren

Charles Warren
In 1957, he wrote, produced, and directed an episode of the anthology series Playhouse 90 entitled "Without Incident", which starred Errol Flynn. In 1959, he became producer and occasional writer and director for the series Rawhide starring Eric Fleming and Clint Eastwood. He also served briefly as producer or executive producer for three other western series, Gunslinger, The Iron Horse with Dale Robertson and The Virginian with James Drury. He returned to film as the writer of Day of the Evil Gun (1968), featuring Glenn Ford, and as the writer and director of Charro! (1969) starring Elvis Presley.

Exorcist: The Beginning

John Frankenheimer was initially set to direct, but stepped down just before his death. He was replaced by Paul Schrader, who aimed for a psychological film and delivered what he described as "footage without any of the bloody violence the backers had wanted." The producers were unsatisfied with the completed film Schrader had presented them and fired him, replacing him with Harlin and hiring screenwriter Alexi Hawley to retool the previous script. Harlin re-filmed most of the film, with some new characters added and others deleted. The character of Father Francis, originally played by Gabriel Mann, had to be recast with D'Arcy because Mann had a scheduling conflict.

Franklin J. Schaffner

Franklin SchaffnerFrank[lin SchaffnerFranklin J. Schaffner Award
Franklin James Schaffner (May 30, 1920 – July 2, 1989) was an American film, television, and stage director. He won the Academy Award for Best Director for Patton (1970), and is also known for the films Planet of the Apes (1968), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), Papillon (1973), and The Boys from Brazil (1978). He served as President of the Directors Guild of America between 1987 and 1989.

Television Hall of Fame

Television Academy Hall of FameAcademy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of FameAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame
John Frankenheimer. Bob Mackie. Jean Stapleton. Bud Yorkin. 16th induction (2004). Bob Barker. Charles Cappleman, executive. Art Carney. Katie Couric. Dan Rather. Brandon Tartikoff. 17th induction (2006). Tom Brokaw. James Burrows. Leonard Goldberg. Regis Philbin. William Shatner. 18th induction (2008). Bea Arthur. Daniel Burke. Larry Gelbart. Merv Griffin. Thomas Murphy. Sherwood Schwartz. 19th induction (2010). Candice Bergen. Charles Lisanby. Don Pardo. Gene Roddenberry. Smothers Brothers. Bob Stewart. 20th induction (2011). Diahann Carroll. Tom Freston. Earle Hagen. Susan Harris. Peter Jennings. Cloris Leachman. Bill Todman. 21st induction (2012). Mary-Ellis Bunim and Jonathan Murray.