Rope rescue

High Angle Rescuehigh-angle rescuerope rescues
In the United States, urban/structural rope rescue performed by professional rescue agencies such as EMS, fire departments and Volunteer groups, such as Sheriff Department Rescue Teams, etc., have organizations such as National Fire Protection Association (NFPA 1670, ANSI, and others, along with governmental agencies like OSHA, NIOSH, MSAH, etc. help provide guidelines, suggestions, and regulations. The Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) addresses a number of situations, include confined space rescue, 29 CFR 1910.146 and 29 CFR 1910.147.

Technical rescue

advanced technical RescueRescue TechniciansTechnical Rescue Unit
NFPA standards 1006 and 1670 state that all rescuers must have a minimum of first aid (infection control, bleeding control, shock management) and CPR training to perform any technical rescue operation, including cutting the vehicle itself during an extrication. Rescue squad. 911th Engineer Company.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles (9.8 million km 2 ), the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles (10.1 million km 2 ). With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York.

Police

policingpolice forcepolice department
The force was a success after its first year, and his men had "established their worth by saving £122,000 worth of cargo and by the rescuing of several lives". Word of this success spread quickly, and the government passed the Marine Police Bill on 28 July 1800, transforming it from a private to public police agency; now the oldest police force in the world. Colquhoun published a book on the experiment, The Commerce and Policing of the River Thames. It found receptive audiences far outside London, and inspired similar forces in other cities, notably, New York City, Dublin, and Sydney.

Fire department

fire brigadefire servicefire
Israel and New Zealand have national fire and rescue services. Besides firefighting, fire departments may also provide specialized services, such as hazardous materials mitigation and technical rescue. In many countries or regions (e.g., the United States, Germany, Japan, Hong Kong, Macau), fire departments are often responsible for providing emergency medical services. Firefighters are cross-trained as emergency medical responders, emergency medical technicians, or paramedics. While some services act only as "first responders" to medical emergencies, stabilizing victims until an ambulance can arrive, other fire services also operate ambulance services.

Canada

🇨🇦CanadianCAN
Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 e6km2, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra.

Vehicle extrication

extricationemergency extrication proceduresextricate
NFPA regulation 1006 and 1670 states that all "rescuers", whether they are part of an EMS department, fire department, or police department, must have a minimum of basic life support medical training to perform any technical rescue operation, since it is a comprehensive patient-centered process. After the vehicle has been secured and access gained to the patient, the EMS team then enters to perform more detailed medical care. Continued protection of the patient from extrication itself, using hard and soft protection, should be done at all times.

Heavy rescue vehicle

Heavy RescueRescueheavy rescues
NFPA (National Fire Protection Association in the U.S.) standards 1006 and 1670 give guidance for the operation of heavy rescue vehicles and also state that all "rescuers" must have medical training equivalent to EMT-Basic standard to perform any technical rescue operation, including cutting into the vehicle itself. Therefore, in most all rescue environments, whether it is an EMS Department or Fire Department that runs the rescue, the actual rescuers who cut the vehicle and run the extrication scene are Medical First Responders, Emergency Medical Technicians, or Paramedics, as a traffic collision has a patient involved.

Ambulance

ambulancesmedical carground
The National Fire Protection Association has also published a design standard, NFPA 1917, which some administrations are considering switching to if KKK-A-1822F is withdrawn. . The Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services (CAAS) has published its Ground Vehicle Standard for Ambulances effective July 2016. This standard is similar to the KKK-A-1822F and NFPA 1917-2016 specifications. The move towards standardisation is now reaching countries without a history of prescriptive codes, such as India, which approved its first national standard for ambulance construction in 2013.

Confined space rescue

confined spaceConfined Space Rescuersconfined spaces, posing hazards to rescuers
Agencies that oversee workplace safety require that persons qualified for confined space rescue operations complete rescue training and exercises annually, at the least, and recommend more frequent training. Numerous agencies in the United States have facilities for technical rescue training and often have a confined space training area. In the USA, confined space rescue is covered under the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1670, and under 29 CFR 1910.146 and 29 CFR 1910.147, and must follow Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards or heavy fines will be levied upon the company that violates their regulation and injury occurs in the workplace.

Search and rescue

SARsearch-and-rescueCombat Search and Rescue
Search and Rescue is divided into 4 primary elements, while assigning a federal agency with the lead role for each of the 4 elements. In the U.S., SAR standards are developed primarily by ASTM International and the U.S. NFPA which are then used by organizations such as the Mountain Rescue Association (MRA), the U.S. National Association of Search and Rescue (NASAR), and the NFPA to develop training that will meet or exceed those standards. Within ASTM International, most standards of relevance to SAR are developed by Committee F32 on Search and Rescue. Formed in 1988, the committee had 85 current members and jurisdiction of 38 approved standards.

Self-contained breathing apparatus

breathing apparatusindustrial breathing setself contained breathing apparatus
In the United States and Canada, SCBAs used in firefighting must meet guidelines established by the National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Standard 1981. If an SCBA is labeled as "1981 NFPA compliant", it is designed for firefighting. The current version of the standard was published in 2013. These standards are revised every five years. Similarly, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has a certification program for SCBA that are intended to be used in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) environments. See NIOSH Approved SCBAs.

K38 Water Safety

K38 Water Safety teaches public and federal safety agencies such as lifeguards, military, fire rescue, and law enforcement how to operate personal water craft (PWC), Jet Skis, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Waverunners, Aquatrax, PWC or RWC (Rescue Water Craft). K38 teaches personal water craft rescue training in swiftwater rescue, big wave surfing, tow-in surfers, law enforcement, lifesavers, and federal agencies such as United States Navy, United States Marines, United States Coast Guard, U.S. Border Patrol BORSTAR units and Pararescue. K38 was founded by Shawn Alladio. She is a fourth-generation Santa Ana High School Graduate S.A.H.S. Class of 1979. Ms.

Fire appliances in the United Kingdom

fire enginesappliancesclattering to the fires of London
The most common front line appliance deployed to all emergency calls goes by a variety of names, including Rescue Ladder, Pump Ladder, Water Rescue Tender, or slight variations on those names. It is a general purpose unit capable of carrying and pumping water, carrying rescue and cutting equipment to deal with road traffic accidents and other rescue operations, a large ladder (for example 13.5m) and several smaller ladders and roof ladders. The appliance also carries breathing apparatus, lighting, tools, trauma care packs, water rescue gear, lines (ropes), hoses, and possibly chemical protection suits and foam. The vehicle will be crewed by four to six firefighters.

New South Wales Ambulance

New South Wales Ambulance ServiceAmbulance Service of NSWNSW Ambulance
In 2011, the Emergency Management Unit was amalgamated with the Aeromedical & Medical Retrieval Division to form the new Ambulance Statewide Services Division. * Air Ambulance Australia Rope Rescue. Breathing Apparatus including fully encapsulated gas suits. Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) incidents. Confined Space Rescue. Bushcraft, Navigation and Four-Wheel driving, and. Swiftwater rescue. Paramedics in Australia. Ambulance. Paramedic.

PASS device

Personal Alert Safety System
On a fireground, the sound of an activated PASS device indicates a true emergency and results in an immediate response to rescue the firefighter(s) in distress. In the United States, the National Fire Protection Association sets standards for PASS devices in NFPA 1982. The PASS device is normally used in conjunction with breathing apparatus; it is a small, battery powered device attached to the self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) harness which enables the firefighter to summon help by activating a loud, piercing electronic bleeper.

National Disaster Response Force

NDRFNational Disaster Response Force (NDRF)
During the Kosi breach in Bihar in August 2008, which was declared a national calamity by Prime Minister Shri Manmohan Singh, NDRF personnel actively engaged themselves in rescue operations and relief duties in districts Supaul, Madhepura, Araria and Purnia. About 780 NDRF personnel trained in flood rescue operations along with 153 high capacity inflatable boats and other rescue equipment were deployed in the flood affected areas. The swift and highly skilled operations of NDRF saved more than 100,000 people trapped in swirling waters of river Kosi. NDRF personnel distributed relief supplies including drinking water to the stranded flood victims.

Emergency medical responder

emergency medical respondersEmergency Medical Responder,emergency response organization
The National Fire Protection Association standards 1006 and 1670 state that all "rescuers" must have medical training to perform any technical rescue operation, including cutting the vehicle itself during an extrication. Therefore, in most all rescue environments, whether it is an EMS or fire department that runs the rescue, the actual rescuers who cut the vehicle and run the extrication scene or perform any rescue such as rope rescues or swift water rescue, etc., are Emergency Medical Responders, Emergency Medical Technicians, or Paramedics, as most every rescue has a patient involved.

Rural Metro

Rural/MetroRural/Metro CorporationRural Metro Fire Department
The division maintains membership in the following organizations: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC); Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting Working Group (ARFF WG); American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE); AAAE-Great Lakes Chapter; Louisiana Airport Managers and Associates (LAMA), and ISNetworld. Fire Department. Emergency medical services. Rescue.

Mercia Inshore Search and Rescue

Mercia Inshore Search and Rescue (MISAR), also known as Mercia Rescue, is a water rescue team operating from the marina in Upton-upon-Severn, Worcestershire, England. Mercia Rescue is a registered charity, staffed by volunteers reliant upon donations. The team are currently developing an NVQ qualification in water-borne rescue skills that will be made available to other rescue organisations in the near future. Training in boat handling and VHF Marine Radio is to RYA standards, and Swiftwater rescue training to the American National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1670 Standard on Operations and Training for Technical Rescue is undertaken with the Rescue3 company in Bala, Wales.

Rescue swimming

Rescue Swimming refers to skills that enable an individual to attempt a rescue when a swimmer is in difficulty. These include a combination of communication skills, specific "rescue" swimming strokes, and release and evade techniques for self-preservation should the rescue go wrong. There are four main rescue strokes: the Front crawl (Freestyle), Breaststroke, Inverted Breaststroke, and Sidestroke. *Swiftwater rescue From the outset once a swimmer in difficulty is spotted, eye contact must be maintained at all times. Assess the situation: environment, available physical equipment, others who can help, etc.

Carabiner

carabinerscarabiner clipkarabiner
*Rescue: Minimum breaking strength requirements and calculations for rescue carabiners are set out in National Fire Protection Association standard 1983-2012 edition Fire Service Life Safety Rope and Equipment. The standard defines two classes of rescue carabiners. Technical use rescue carabiners are required to have minimum breaking strengths of 27 kN gate closed, 7 kN gate open and 7 kN minor axis. General use rescue carabiners are required to have minimum breaking strengths of 40 kN gate closed, 11 kN gate open and 11 kN minor axis. Testing procedures for rescue carabiners are set out in ASTM International standard F 1956 Standard Specification of Rescue Carabiners. 1) Oval: Symmetric.

Certified first responder

first respondersfirst responderemergency responder
The National Fire Protection Association standards 1006 and 1670 state that all "rescuers" must have medical training to perform any technical rescue operation, including cutting the vehicle itself during an extrication. Therefore, in most all rescue environments, whether it is an EMS or Fire Department that runs the rescue, the actual rescuers who cut the vehicle and run the extrication scene or perform any rescue such as rope rescues or swift water rescue, etc., are Emergency Medical Responders, Emergency Medical Technicians, or Paramedics, as most every rescue has a patient involved.

Glossary of firefighting

Engine Companytruck companiescockloft
NFPA: The National Fire Protection Association, a publisher which provides a methodology of developing a number of standards and practices for *firefighting, equipment, and fire protection in the United States, and also adopted in many other countries. Also, slang for "No Free Publications Available"; used as a criticism of publishers that produce "must-have" documents that are prohibitively expensive. NIOSH: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. A U.S. agency responsible for investigation of workplace deaths, including firefighters. NIMS: The National Incident Management System. A federally mandated program for the standardizing of command terminology and procedures.

Flood

floodingfloodsflood control
International Rescue Corps. Lifesaving. List of floods. Mudflow. Swift water rescue. Search and rescue. SMS (hydrology software). Storm drain. Washout. Floods by land:. Chicago flood, man-made flood under downtown Chicago. Floods in Australia. Floods in the Netherlands. Flood control in the Netherlands. Lists of floods in the United States. Storm tides of the North Sea. O'Connor, Jim E. & John E. Costa (2004) The World's Largest Floods, Past and Present: Their Causes and Magnitudes [Circular 1254], Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. Thompson, M.T., (1964). Historical Floods in New England [Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1779-M].