Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, Billy Tauzin of Louisiana, Kent Hance and Ralph Hall of Texas and Richard Shelby of Alabama are examples of this. The influx of conservative Democrats into the Republican Party is often cited as a reason for the Republican Party's shift further to the right during the late 20th century as well as the shift of its base from the Northeast and Midwest to the South. Into the 1980s, the Democratic Party had a conservative element, mostly from the South and Border regions. Their numbers declined sharply as the Republican Party built up its Southern base. They were sometimes humorously called "Yellow dog Democrats", or "boll weevils" and "Dixiecrats".

United States Senate

SenatorSenateU.S. Senator
Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate. Elections in the United States. List of African-American United States Senators. United States Presidents and control of Congress. Women in the United States Senate. Classes of United States Senators. Baker, Richard A. The Senate of the United States: A Bicentennial History Krieger, 1988. Baker, Richard A., ed., First Among Equals: Outstanding Senate Leaders of the Twentieth Century Congressional Quarterly, 1991.

John C. Stennis

John StennisJohn C. Stennis Center for Public Service Training and DevelopmentStennis
(It has since been surpassed by Robert Byrd, Strom Thurmond, Ted Kennedy, Daniel Inouye, Patrick Leahy, and Orrin Hatch leaving Stennis eighth). Stennis is buried at Pinecrest Cemetery in Kemper County. * List of United States Congress members killed or wounded in office * Stennis Center for Public Service. "Tribute to John C. Stennis". Retrieved June 16, 2005. * Stennis Center for Public Service John C. Stennis Space Center. John C. Stennis Center for Public Service Training and Development. John C. Stennis National Student Congress of the National Forensic League. John C. Stennis Lock and Dam. John C. Stennis Institute of Government. John C. Stennis Scholarship in Political Science.

John McCain

McCainSenator John McCainJohn S. McCain III
Working with Democratic Senator Ted Kennedy, McCain was a strong proponent of comprehensive immigration reform, which would involve legalization, guest worker programs, and border enforcement components. The Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act was never voted on in 2005, while the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006 passed the Senate in May 2006 but failed in the House.

100th United States Congress

100th100th Congress100
Strom Thurmond (R). 3. Ernest Hollings (D). 2. Larry Pressler (R). 3. Tom Daschle (D). 1. Jim Sasser (D). 2. Al Gore (D). 1. Lloyd Bentsen (D). 2. Phil Gramm (R). 1. Orrin Hatch (R). 3. Jake Garn (R). 1. Robert Stafford (R). 3. Patrick Leahy (D). 1. Paul S. Trible, Jr. (R). 2. John Warner (R). 1. Daniel J. Evans (R). 3. Brock Adams (D). 1. Robert Byrd (D). 2. Jay Rockefeller (D). 1. William Proxmire (D). 3. Bob Kasten (R). 1. Malcolm Wallop (R). 2. Alan K. Simpson (R). . Sonny Callahan (R). . Bill Dickinson (R). . William Flynt Nichols (D), until December 13, 1988. . Tom Bevill (D). . Ronnie G. Flippo (D). . Ben Erdreich (D). . Claude Harris (D). . John J. Rhodes III (R). . Mo Udall (D). .

Impeachment of Bill Clinton

impeachmentimpeachment trialimpeachment proceedings
On January 25, Senator Robert Byrd of West Virginia moved for dismissals of both articles of impeachment for lack of merit. On the following day, Rep. Bryant moved to call witnesses to the trial, a question that the Senate had scrupulously avoided to that point. In both cases, the Senate voted to deliberate on the question in private session, rather than public, televised procedure. On January 27, the Senate voted on both motions in public session; the motion to dismiss failed on a nearly party line vote of 56–44, while the motion to depose witnesses passed by the same margin.

97th United States Congress

97th97th CongressNinety-seventh
Strom Thurmond (R). 3. Ernest F. Hollings (D). 2. Larry Pressler (R). 3. James Abdnor (R). 1. Jim Sasser (D). 2. Howard Baker (R). 1. Lloyd Bentsen (D). 2. John G. Tower (R). 1. Orrin G. Hatch (R). 3. Jake Garn (R). 1. Robert T. Stafford (R). 3. Patrick Leahy (D). 1. Harry F. Byrd Jr. (I). 2. John W. Warner (R). 1. Henry M. Jackson (D). 3. Slade Gorton (R). 1. Robert C. Byrd (D). 2. Jennings Randolph (D). 1. William Proxmire (D). 3. Bob Kasten (R). 1. Malcolm Wallop (R). 2. Alan K. Simpson (R). . Jack Edwards (R). . Bill Dickinson (R). . Bill Nichols (D). . Tom Bevill (D). . Ronnie G. Flippo (D). . Albert L. Smith Jr. (R). . Richard Shelby (D). . John J. Rhodes (R). . Morris K. Udall (D). .

98th United States Congress

98th98th CongressNinety-eighth
President pro tempore: Strom Thurmond (R). Majority Leader: Howard Baker. Majority Whip: Ted Stevens. Republican Conference Chairman: James A. McClure. Republican Conference Secretary: Jake Garn. National Senatorial Committee Chair: Richard Lugar. Policy Committee Chairman: John Tower. Minority Leader and Democratic Conference Chairman: Robert C. Byrd. Minority Whip: Alan Cranston. Caucus Secretary: Daniel Inouye. Campaign Committee Chairman: Lloyd Bentsen. Majority Leader: Jim Wright. Majority Whip: Tom Foley. Chief Deputy Majority Whip: William Vollie Alexander Jr. Democratic Caucus Chairman: Gillis William Long. Caucus Secretary: Geraldine Ferraro.

101st United States Congress

101st101st Congress101
Strom Thurmond (R). 3. Ernest F. Hollings (D). 2. Larry Pressler (R). 3. Tom Daschle (D). 1. Jim Sasser (D). 2. Al Gore (D). 1. Lloyd Bentsen (D). 2. Phil Gramm (R). 1. Orrin Hatch (R). 3. Jake Garn (R). 1. Jim Jeffords (R). 3. Patrick Leahy (D). 1. Chuck Robb (D). 2. John Warner (R). 1. Slade Gorton (R). 3. Brock Adams (D). 1. Robert Byrd (D). 2. Jay Rockefeller (D). 1. Herb Kohl (D). 3. Bob Kasten (R). 1. Malcolm Wallop (R). 2. Alan K. Simpson (R). . Sonny Callahan (R). . Bill Dickinson (R). . Glen Browder (D), from April 4, 1989. . Tom Bevill (D). . Ronnie G. Flippo (D). . Ben Erdreich (D). . Claude Harris (D). . John J. Rhodes III (R). . Mo Udall (D). . Bob Stump (R). . Jon Kyl (R). .

Robert Bork Supreme Court nomination

nominationnominatesnominated
Within 45 minutes of Bork's nomination to the Court, Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA) took to the Senate floor with a strong condemnation of Bork in a nationally televised speech, declaring: Robert Bork's America is a land in which women would be forced into back-alley abortions, blacks would sit at segregated lunch counters, rogue police could break down citizens' doors in midnight raids, and schoolchildren could not be taught about evolution, writers and artists could be censored at the whim of the Government, and the doors of the Federal courts would be shut on the fingers of millions of citizens.

Clarence Thomas Supreme Court nomination

Clarence Thomasconfirmation hearingsClarence Thomas' confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court
On July 1, 1991, President George H. W. Bush nominated Clarence Thomas for the Supreme Court of the United States to replace Thurgood Marshall, who had announced his retirement. The nomination proceedings were contentious from the start, especially over the issue of abortion, and many women's groups and civil rights groups opposed Thomas on the basis of his conservative political views, as they had also opposed Bush's Supreme Court nominee from the previous year, David Souter.

James Eastland

James O. EastlandEastlandSenator James Eastland
Eastland, along with senators Robert Byrd, John McClellan, Olin D. Johnston, Sam Ervin, and Strom Thurmond, made unsuccessful attempts to block confirmation of Thurgood Marshall, an African American, to the Federal Court of Appeals and the US Supreme Court. During his later years, in the face of increasing black political power in Mississippi, Eastland avoided associating with racist positions. He hired black Mississippians to serve on the staff of the Judiciary Committee. Eastland noted to aides that his earlier position on race was caused primarily by the political realities of the times, when a major political figure in a Southern state was expected to endorse such positions.

Voting Rights Act of 1965

Voting Rights Act1965 Voting Rights Act1965
Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC) retorted that the bill would lead to "despotism and tyranny", and Senator Sam Ervin (D-NC) argued that the bill was unconstitutional because it deprived states of their right under [[Article One of the United States Constitution#Section 2: House of Representatives|Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution]] to establish voter qualifications and because the bill's special provisions targeted only certain jurisdictions. On May 6, Ervin offered an amendment to abolish the coverage formula's automatic trigger and instead allow federal judges to appoint federal examiners to administer voter registration.

President pro tempore of the United States Senate

President pro temporePresident pro tempore of the SenatePresident ''pro tempore'' of the Senate
The position has been held by Strom Thurmond (R-South Carolina) (2001–2003), Robert Byrd (D-West Virginia) (2003–2007), Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) (2007–2009) and Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) (2015–present). From 2009 to 2015, no senator met the requirements for the position. The position was created for Thurmond when the Democratic Party regained a majority in the Senate in June 2001. With the change in party control, Democrat Robert Byrd of West Virginia replaced Thurmond as president pro tempore, reclaiming a position he had previously held from 1989 to 1995 and briefly in January 2001.

List of United States Senators in the 105th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 105th United States Congress listed by seniority, from January 3, 1997, to January 3, 1999.

List of United States Senators in the 104th Congress by seniority

8th most senior U.S. Senator7th most senior Senator
This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 104th United States Congress listed by seniority, from January 3, 1995, to January 3, 1997.

99th United States Congress

99th99th CongressNinety-ninth
President pro tempore: Strom Thurmond. Majority Leader: Bob Dole. Majority Whip: Alan K. Simpson. Conference Chairman: John Chafee. Republican Conference Secretary: Thad Cochran. National Senatorial Committee Chair: H. John Heinz III. Policy Committee Chairman: William L. Armstrong. Minority Leader: Robert Byrd. Minority Whip: Alan Cranston. Caucus Secretary: Daniel Inouye. Campaign Committee Chairman: George J. Mitchell. Majority Leader: Jim Wright. Majority Whip: Tom Foley. Chief Deputy Majority Whip: William Vollie Alexander Jr. Democratic Caucus Chairman: Dick Gephardt. Caucus Secretary: Mary Rose Oakar. Democratic Campaign Committee Chairman: Tony Coelho. Minority Leader: Robert H.

96th United States Congress

96thNinety-sixth96th Congress
Strom Thurmond (R). 3. Ernest F. Hollings (D). 3. George McGovern (D). 2. Larry Pressler (R). 2. Howard Baker (R). 1. Jim Sasser (D). 2. John G. Tower (R). 1. Lloyd Bentsen (D). 3. Jake Garn (R). 1. Orrin G. Hatch (R). 1. Robert T. Stafford (R). 3. Patrick Leahy (D). 1. Harry F. Byrd, Jr. (I). 2. John W. Warner (R). 3. Warren G. Magnuson (D). 1. Henry M. Jackson (D). 2. Jennings Randolph (D). 1. Robert C. Byrd (D). 1. William Proxmire (D). 3. Gaylord Nelson (D). 1. Malcolm Wallop (R). 2. Alan K. Simpson (R). . Jack Edwards (R). . Bill Dickinson (R). . Bill Nichols (D). . Tom Bevill (D). . Ronnie G. Flippo (D). . John Hall Buchanan, Jr. (R). . Dick Shelby (D). . John J. Rhodes (R). .

107th United States Congress

107th107th Congress107
Indian Affairs (Select) (Chair: Daniel Inouye, then Ben Nighthorse Campbell, then Daniel Inouye). Intelligence (Select) (Chair: Bob Graham, then Richard Shelby, then Bob Graham). Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (Chair: Ted Kennedy,then Jim Jeffords, then Ted Kennedy). [[United States Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension Subcommittee on Children and Families|Children and Families]]. [[United States Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension Subcommittee on Public Health|Public Health]]. Aging. [[United States Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension Subcommittee on Employment, Safety and Training|Employment, Safety and Training]].