List of accidents and incidents involving the Lockheed C-130 Hercules

crashedIndonesian Air Force (A-1324)C-130H 5-8552
November 26, 1962: C-130A 56-0488, c/n 3096, of the 4442nd Combat Crew Training Squadron, crashed on go-around at Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee, during a training flight – lost two engines. Five crew killed. August 27, 1963: C-130A 56-0474, c/n 3082, of the 315th Air Division, burned at Naha Air Base, Okinawa, during refuelling. May 2, 1964: C-130A 56-0492, c/n 3100, of the 315th Air Division, crashed on landing at Ie Shima Island, Japan, when it hit the edge of the runway. Fuselage to Sukiran for paratrooper training.

I Troop Carrier Command

Air Transport CommandAir Transport Command (later I Troop Carrier Command)
In 1959, the mission was moved to Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee, and in 1971 to Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, where it remains today under Air Education and Training Command (AETC). In the Pacific, the FEAF Combat Cargo Command was organized to control Far East Air Forces Troop Carrier Groups operating primarily in Occupied Japan. During the Korean War it was re-designated as the 315th Air Division when the number of units was expanded to support the United Nations forces in Korea. In the subsequent Cold War of the 1950s and 1960s, Pacific Air Forces (PACAF) expanded its Troop Carrier units to include units in the Philippines, Okinawa and Taiwan.

16th Airlift Squadron

16th Troop Carrier Squadron16th Squadron16th
Reactivated during the Korean War at Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee and equipped with Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars and other assault transports to be used for airborne combat assault operations. Performed training for combat units, but remained in the United States. Moved to Ardmore Air Force Base, Oklahoma in 1954 and was inactivated in 1955. Reactivated during the Vietnam War as a Lockheed C-130 Hercules airlift training squadron at Sewart Air Force Base, moved to Little Rock Air Force Base in 1970 with the closure of Sewart.

Prentice Cooper

former governorWilliam Prentice Cooper
Large defense-related facilities were built throughout the state, including Fort Campbell, most of which is in Tennessee despite its Kentucky address, a naval training base in Millington, and Sewart Air Force Base in Smyrna. Defense-related plants, employing thousands of Tennesseans, were also built, among them a gunpowder plant at Millington, a shell-loading factory in Milan, and an aircraft factory in Nashville. In 1942, the federal government appropriated land in what is now Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the top secret Manhattan Project which was developing the world's first atomic bomb. Cooper was not informed of the purpose of the project.

Capitol Air

Capitol International AirwaysCapitol Int'l AirwaysCapitol International
In 1971 Capitol International Airways moved to Smyrna, Tennessee, at Sewart Air Force Base. Capitol remained strong as a military contract air carrier. According to the Capitol Air system timetable dated November 5, 1981, the airline was operating scheduled passenger service to the following domestic and international destinations: The above referenced timetable also states that all flights were being operated with stretched, Super Douglas DC-8 series 60 and wide body McDonnell Douglas DC-10 jetliners at this time.

Kentucky World War II Army Airfields

During World War II, the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) established numerous airfields in Kentucky for training pilots and aircrews of USAAF fighters and bombers.

4709th Air Defense Wing

4709th Defense Wing4709th Defense (later Air Defense) Wing
Sewart AFB, New York, 18 August 1955 – 8 July 1956. 519th Air Defense Group. Suffolk County AFB, New York, 16 February 1953 – 18 August 1955. 568th Air Base Group (later 568th Air Defense Group), 1 February 1952 – 8 July 1954. 4700th Air Defense Group. Sewart AFB, New York, 20 September 1954 – 18 August 1955. 2d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 6 February 1952 – 16 February 1953; 8 July 1954 – 18 August 1955. 5th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 6 February 1952 – 16 February 1953; 8 July 1954 – 18 August 1955. 45th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron. Suffolk County AFB, New York, 1 November 1952 – 16 February 1953. 46th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron.

List of MAJCOM wings of the United States Air Force

List of MAJCOM wingsMAJCONMajor Command Controlled
This is a list of Major Air Command (MAJCOM) Wings of the United States Air Force (USAF), a designation system in use from the summer of 1948 to the mid-1990s. From 1948 to 1991 MAJCOMs had the authority to form wings using manpower authorizations under their control. Each MAJCOM or other organization reporting directly to USAF was assigned a block of four digit numbers to use for units it organized. The system terminated in 1991 when USAF assumed control of all units except for provisional ones.

378th Troop Carrier Squadron

378th Bombardment Squadron (Medium)378th Bombardment Squadrons
Aircraft, equipment and personnel returned to Ardmore AFB during July and August 1958 where aircraft and personnel reassigned to squadrons of the 463d Troop Carrier Wing at Sewart AFB, Tennessee. Squadron inactivated as a paper unit in September 1958. * 772d Expeditionary Airlift Squadron (ACC) Factsheet Constituted 378th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 28 January 1942. Activated on 15 March 1942. Disbanded on 1 May 1944. Reconstituted, and redesignated 378th Troop Carrier Squadron (Medium), on 16 May 1949. Activated in the reserve on 26 June 1949. Inactivated on 28 January 1950. Redesignated 378th Troop Carrier Squadron (Assault, Fixed Wing) on 14 April 1955. Activated on 8 July 1955.

376th Troop Carrier Squadron

376th376th Bomb Squadron376th Bombardment Squadron (Medium)
Aircraft, equipment and personnel returned to Ardmore AFB during July and August 1958 where aircraft and personnel reassigned to squadrons of the 463d Troop Carrier Wing at Sewart AFB, Tennessee. Squadron inactivated as a paper unit in September 1958. * 772 Expeditionary Airlift Squadron (ACC) Factsheet Constituted 376th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 28 January 1942. Activated on 15 March 1942. Disbanded on 1 May 1944. Reconstituted, and redesignated 376th Troop Carrier Squadron (Medium), on 16 May 1949. Activated in the reserve on 26 June 1949. Inactivated on 28 January 1950. Redesignated 376th Troop Carrier Squadron (Assault, Fixed Wing) on 14 April 1955. Activated on 8 July 1955.

Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command

EasternSouth Eastern Training CenterSoutheast
Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command (EFTC) was a unit of the United States Army Air Forces. It was assigned to the Army Air Forces Training Command, stationed at Maxwell Field, Alabama. It was inactivated on 15 December 1945.

313th Expeditionary Operations Group

313th Troop Carrier Group313th Tactical Airlift Group313th Transport Group
Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee, 2 October 1953 – 8 June 1955. RAF Mildenhall, England, 15 September 1978 – 16 January 1993.

22d Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron

22nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron
The USAF Tactical Medical Center was inactivated on 16 September 1957, while at the same time, the 22d Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron was reassigned to Sewart AFB, Tennessee; it was moved again to Pope AFB, North Carolina in 1968. On 1 July 1970, the 22d Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons was inactivated. All personnel and equipment were reassigned to the 1st Aeromedical Evacuation Group.

8th Weapons Squadron

8th Combat Cargo Squadron8th Tactical Deployment Control Squadron8th Airborne Command and Control Squadron
Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee, 14 March–16 December 1952. Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, 15 October 1969 – 8 March 1971. Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, 1 February 1972. Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, 15 June 1978 – 15 May 1996. Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, 3 February 2003 – present. None (ferried aircraft), 1942–1944. Curtiss C-46 Commando, 1944–1945. Douglas C-47 Skytrain, 1944, 1945. Sikorsky H-5 Dragonfly, 1949–1952. Sikorsky H-19 Chickasaw (Helicopter), 1952. Lockheed EC-121 Warning Star, 1969–1970. Boeing C-135 Stratolifter, 1972-1996. Boeing EC-135, 1972-1996.

Adriel N. Williams

Upon his return from his duty in Japan, Williams was assigned to command the 314th Troop Carrier Wing, Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee. In July 1957, he was assigned as inspector general, Headquarters Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. At this point in his career, with the exception of the three school assignments, General Williams had been either directly in command of a troop carrier organization or in staff work directly concerned with airborne operations. He worked closely with such units as the 11th, 82d, and 101st airborne divisions. In early 1940 he was copilot on the aircraft that dropped the first Army paratrooper at Fort Benning, Georgia.

List of major bases and units of Tactical Air Command

Sewart AFB, Tennessee(1 November 1948 – 1 December 1948, 1 December 1950 - 31 May 1971314th Troop Carrier Wing (1948, 1950–1966)463d Troop Carrier Wing (1959–1963)64th Troop Carrier/Tactical Airlift Wing (1966–1971). Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina(6 January 1956 – 1 June 1992)83d Fighter-Day Wing (1956–1957)4th Fighter Wing (1957–1992). Shaw AFB, South Carolina(1 December 1950 – 1 June 1992)20th Fighter Group (1947–1948, 1950–1951)363d Reconnaissance/Fighter Wing (1951–1992)66th Reconnaissance Wing (1953)432d Reconnaissance Group/Wing (1953–1963).

List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1950–1954)

a F-84 crasheda F-94 crashedditched
Aircraft was equipped with an HTR-13 obstruction-warning radar but it did not take control of the aircraft to raise it over obstructions, only providing a warning. 16 January :A USAF Douglas B-26 Invader, returning to Sewart AFB, Tennessee, from Shaw AFB, South Carolina, crashes under murky skies into a home near Nashville, Tennessee, killing all three crew but sparing three residents serious injury. The house was badly burned and wreckage was spread out over "about a three-quarter-mile area" after the bomber exploded. Crew bodies were badly mangled. 26 January :A RAF Boeing Washington B.1, WF495, of 149 Squadron, disappears during the night en route from Prestwick to Laagens in the Azores.

772d Expeditionary Airlift Squadron

772d Tactical Airlift Squadron772d Bombardment Squadron772d Troop Carrier Squadron
Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee, 15 November 1958. Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, 5 July 1963 – 7 February 1966. Mactan Island Airfield, Philippines, 12 February 1966. Clark Air Base, Philippines, 15 July 1968 – 15 June 1971. Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, 1 June 1972 – 1 October 1993.

Army Air Forces Training Command

AAF Flying Training CommandAir Corps Flying Training CommandArmy Air Corps
The US Army Air Forces in WWII had major subordinate Commands below the Air Staff level. These Commands were organized along functional missions. One such Command was the Flying Training Command (FTC). It began as Air Corps Flying Training Command on 23 January 1942, was redesignated Army Air Forces Flying Training Command (AAFTC) on 15 March 1942, and merged with Army Air Forces Technical Training Command to become Army Air Forces Training Command on 31 July 1943. Continuing service after the war, it was redesignated Air Training Command on 1 July 1946.

309th Maintenance Wing

309th Bombardment Group309th Troop Carrier Group
Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee, 26 June 1949 – 20 February 1951. Ardmore Air Force Base, Oklahoma, 8 July 1955. Dreux Air Base, France, 22 March 1956 – 20 April 1958. Hill Air Force Base, Utah 24 February 2005 – 12 July 2012. B-25 Mitchell, 1942–1944. C-47 Skytrain, 1949-1950. C-82 Packet, 1949–1950. C-119 Flying Boxcar, 1949–1950. C-122 Avitruc, 1955–1956. C-123 Provider, 1955–1958.

773d Airlift Squadron

773d Bombardment Squadron773d Troop Carrier Squadron773d Tactical Airlift Squadron
Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee, 15 November 1958. Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, 5 July 1963 – 7 February 1966. Mactan Island Airfield, Philippines, 12 February 1966. Clark Air Base, Philippines, 15 July 1968 – 15 June 1971. Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, 1 June 1972 – 1 October 1993. Deployed at RAF Mildenhall, England, 1 June – 14 July 1972; 28 August – 16 November 1972. Deployed at Ching Chuan Kang Air Base, Taiwan, 28 February-c. 10 May 1973. Deployed at RAF Mildenhall, England, 5 July – 5 September 1973; 5 May – 15 July 1974; 5 May – 14 July 1975. Youngstown-Warren Air Reserve Station, Ohio, 1 April 1995 - 1 April 2014. B-17 Flying Fortress, 1943–1945.