American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican RevolutionAmerican War of Independence
Bibliography of the American Revolutionary War. Bibliography of George Washington. Commemoration of the American Revolution. Diplomacy in the American Revolutionary War. British Army during the American War of Independence. First Treaty of San Ildefonso. First League of Armed Neutrality. Fourth Anglo-Dutch War. George Washington in the American Revolution. Intelligence in the American Revolutionary War. List of American Revolutionary War battles. List of British Forces in the American Revolutionary War. List of Continental Forces in the American Revolutionary War. List of infantry weapons in the American Revolution. List of plays and films about the American Revolution.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States (1789–1797). He commanded Patriot forces in the new nation's vital American Revolutionary War and led them to victory over the British. Washington also presided at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, which established the new federal government. For his manifold leadership during the American Revolution, he has been called the "Father of His Country". Washington succeeded a prosperous family of slaveholding planters in colonial Virginia.

Southern United States

SouthSouthernthe South
The southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland, or simply the South, is a region of the United States of America. It is located between the Atlantic Ocean and the western United States, with the midwestern United States and northeastern United States to its north and the Gulf of Mexico and Mexico to its south. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. The Deep South is fully located in the southeastern corner.

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
In 1777, General Henry Knox founded the Springfield Armory, which during the Industrial Revolution catalyzed numerous important technological advances, including interchangeable parts. In 1786, Shays' Rebellion, a populist revolt led by disaffected American Revolutionary War veterans, influenced the United States Constitutional Convention. In the 18th century, the Protestant First Great Awakening, which swept the Atlantic World, originated from the pulpit of Northampton preacher Jonathan Edwards. In the late 18th century, Boston became known as the "Cradle of Liberty" for the agitation there that led to the American Revolution.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
Constitutionalism in the United States. History of democracy. List of national constitutions (world countries). List of proposed amendments to the United States Constitution. List of sources of law in the United States. National Constitution Center. Pocket Constitution. State constitution (United States). Second Constitutional Convention of the United States. The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation. Mayflower Compact (1620). Fundamental Orders of Connecticut (1639). Massachusetts Body of Liberties (1641). Bill of Rights 1689 – English Bill of Rights. United States Declaration of Independence (1776). Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom (1779).

Province of New York

New Yorkcolony of New Yorkcolonial New York
On July 30, 1777, George Clinton was inaugurated as the first Governor of New York at Kingston. On July 9, 1778, the State of New York signed the Articles of Confederation and officially became a part of the government of the United States of America, though it had been a part of the nation since it was declared in 1776 with signatories from New York. The province was the scene of the largest battle of the entire war, and the first after the Declaration of Independence was signed.

Stamp Act Congress

Stamp Act Congress Delegate
American Enlightenment. Timeline of the American Revolution.

Congress of the Confederation

CongressConfederation CongressContinental Congress
The Congress of the Confederation was succeeded by the Congress of the United States as provided for in the new Constitution of the United States, proposed September 17, 1787, in Philadelphia and ratified by the states through 1787 to 1788 and even into 1789 and 1790. The Congress of the Confederation opened in the last stages of the American Revolution. Combat ended in October 1781, with the surrender of the British after the Siege and Battle of Yorktown. The British, however, continued to occupy New York City, while the American delegates in Paris, named by the Congress, negotiated the terms of peace with Great Britain.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
Current members of the United States House of Representatives. Current members of the United States Senate. List of United States Congresses. Lobbying in the United States. 115th United States Congress. Party divisions of United States Congresses. Term limits in the United States. United States Congressional Baseball Game. United States congressional hearing. United States presidents and control of congress. United States Congress Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction. Radio and Television Correspondents' Association. Baker, Ross K. (2000). House and Senate, 3rd ed. New York: W. W. Norton. (Procedural, historical, and other information about both houses).

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
The changing world order that the war had brought about, in particular the growth of the United States and Japan as naval powers, and the rise of independence movements in India and Ireland, caused a major reassessment of British imperial policy. Forced to choose between alignment with the United States or Japan, Britain opted not to renew its Japanese alliance and instead signed the 1922 Washington Naval Treaty, where Britain accepted naval parity with the United States.

Washington, D.C.

WashingtonDistrict of ColumbiaWashington, DC
., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, first President of the United States and Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually. The signing of the Residence Act on July 16, 1790 approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. The U.S.

Staten Island

RichmondRichmond CountyStaten Island, New York
The New York Cosmos u23, part of the USL Premier Development League (PDL), call Staten Island home. The team plays at Monsignor Farrell High School and is affiliated with the New York Cosmos. Public schools in the borough are managed by the New York City Department of Education, the largest public school system in the United States.

Battle of Long Island

Battle of BrooklynLong IslandBrooklyn
The victory over the Americans gave the British control of the strategically important New York City. It was fought on August 27, 1776, and was the first major battle of the American Revolutionary War to take place after the United States declared its independence on July 4, 1776. In troop deployment and combat, it was the largest battle of the entire war. After defeating the British in the Siege of Boston on March 17, 1776, commander-in-chief General George Washington brought the Continental Army to defend the port city of New York, located at the southern end of Manhattan Island.

Irish Americans

IrishIrish-AmericanIrish immigrants
O'Brien examined many of the muster rolls from the Revolutionary War and found mostly quintessential native Irish surnames and possible Anglicized Irish surnames, he estimated that some 38% of those in the revolutionary army were Irish. Irish Americans signed the foundational documents of the United States—the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution—and, beginning with Andrew Jackson, served as President. The early Ulster immigrants and their descendants at first usually referred to themselves simply as "Irish," without the qualifier "Scotch."

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeColumbia University President
Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York) is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Established in 1754, Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in New York and the fifth-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. It is one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence, seven of which belong to the Ivy League. It has been ranked by numerous major education publications as among the top ten universities in the world.

Postage stamps and postal history of the United States

United States postage stampsU.S. postage stampU.S. postage stamps
In the years leading up to the American Revolution mail routes among the colonies existed along the few roads between Boston, New York and Philadelphia. In the middle 18th century, individuals like Benjamin Franklin and William Goddard were the colonial postmasters who managed the mails then and were the general architects of a postal system that started out as an alternative to the Crown Post (the colonial mail system then) which was now becoming more distrusted as the American Revolution drew near. The postal system that Franklin and Goddard forged out of the American Revolution became the standard for the new U.S.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
O'Sullivan coined the phrase, "Manifest Destiny", as the "design of Providence" supporting the territorial expansion of the United States. Manifest Destiny had serious consequences for Native Americans, since continental expansion for the United States took place at the cost of their occupied land. A justification for the policy of conquest and subjugation of the indigenous people emanated from the stereotyped perceptions of all Native Americans as "merciless Indian savages" (as described in the United States Declaration of Independence).

Scotch-Irish Americans

Scots-IrishScotch-IrishScotch Irish
However, he is also the man who said: "But a hyphenated American is not an American at all. This is just as true of the man who puts "native"* before the hyphen as of the man who puts German or Irish or English or French before the hyphen." (*Roosevelt was referring to "nativists", not American Indians, in this context) (25th Vice President of the United States, 1901; 33rd Governor of New York, 1899–1900; Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1897–1898; New York City Police Commissioners Board President, 1895–1897; New York State Assembly Minority Leader, 1883; New York State Assembly Member, 1882–1884).

Maryland

MDState of MarylandMd.
Maryland was one of the thirteen colonies that revolted against British rule in the American Revolution. Near the end of the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), on February 2, 1781, Maryland became the last and 13th state to approve the ratification of the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, first proposed in 1776 and adopted by the Second Continental Congress in 1778, which brought into being the United States as a united, sovereign and national state. It also became the seventh state admitted to the Union after ratifying the new federal Constitution in 1788.

Philip Livingston

Philip PhilipLivingston family
Philip Livingston (January 15, 1716 - June 12, 1778) was an American merchant and statesman from New York City. He was a delegate for New York to the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1778, and signed the Declaration of Independence. Philip Livingston born in Albany, New York, on January 15, 1716 the fourth surviving son of Philip Livingston (1686–1749), 2nd Lord of the Manor and Catherine Van Brugh Livingston, the daughter of Albany, New York, Mayor Pieter Van Brugh.

Supreme Court of the United States

Supreme CourtUnited States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme Court
New York; Adair v. United States). Under the White and Taft Courts (1910–30), the Court held that the Fourteenth Amendment had incorporated some guarantees of the Bill of Rights against the states (Gitlow v. New York), grappled with the new antitrust statutes (Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey v. United States), upheld the constitutionality of military conscription (Selective Draft Law Cases) and brought the substantive due process doctrine to its first apogee (Adkins v. Children's Hospital).

New York (state)

New YorkNYNew York State
In 1777, American forces defeated a major British Army, which led France to recognize the independence of the United States, and enter the war as a decisive military ally of the struggling Americans. Statue of Liberty National Monument includes Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. The statue, designed by Frédéric Bartholdi, was a gift from France to the United States to mark the Centennial of the American Declaration of Independence; it was dedicated in New York Harbor on October 28, 1886. It has since become an icon of the United States and the concepts of democracy and freedom. Stonewall National Monument, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, is the first U.S.

Scottish Americans

ScottishScottish-AmericanScots
National Tartan Day, held each year on April 6 in the United States and Canada, celebrates the historical links between Scotland and North America and the contributions Scottish Americans and Canadians have made to US and Canadian democracy, industry and society. The date of April 6 was chosen as "the anniversary of the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320—the inspirational document, according to U.S. Senate Resolution 155, 1999, upon which the American Declaration of Independence was modeled". The Annual Tartan Week celebrations come to life every April with the largest celebration taking place in New York City.

Charleston, South Carolina

CharlestonCharleston, SCCharles Town
Until it was acquired by the state university system in 1970, the College of Charleston was the oldest municipally supported college in the United States. Delegates for the Continental Congress were elected in 1774, and South Carolina declared its independence from Britain on the steps of the Exchange. As part of the Southern theater of the American Revolution, the British attacked the town in force three times, generally assuming that the settlement had a large base of Loyalists who would rally to their cause once given some military support.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States. William Penn, an English Quaker, founded the city in 1682 to serve as capital of the Pennsylvania Colony. Philadelphia played an instrumental role in the American Revolution as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 at the Second Continental Congress, and the Constitution at the Philadelphia Convention of 1787.