St. Hilda's Church on Hartlepool Headland, built by the Normans and for centuries known as the Jewel of Herterpol.
Publicity photo of Rosemary Prinz as Penny Hughes from As the World Turns

George Mallaby as Colonel Mike Mustard

- Cluedo (Australian game show)

After Homicide he was an original cast member of The Box in the lead role of television executive Paul Donovan, staying in the role from 1974 until 1975.

- George Mallaby (actor)

George Mallaby won the Best Australian Actor-National Logie Award in 1975 for his portrayal of television executive Paul Donovan in The Box.

- The Box (Australian TV series)
St. Hilda's Church on Hartlepool Headland, built by the Normans and for centuries known as the Jewel of Herterpol.
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Orthodox Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II
Present-day Middle-Eastern Syriac Christian denominations
Old Testament Trinity icon by Andrei Rublev, c. 1400 (Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow)
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Catholic Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Joseph III Yonan
East Syriac (Church of the East) metropolitan sees in Asia from the 9th to the 13th centuries
An Icon of Christ the Ancient of Days fresco Ubisi, Georgia
Holy Qurobo in the Maronite Church
West Syriac dioceses of the Syriac Orthodox Church during the medieval period
A West Syriac Rite Holy Qurbono of the Jacobite Syrian Christian Church holding paterissa (crozier)
Holy Qurbana of the Syriac Orthodox Church celebration of the Divine Liturgy of Saint James
A West Syriac Rite Holy Qurbono of the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church
Present-day divisions of Saint Thomas Christians (also known as Syrian Christians)
Holy Qurobo in the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church
Celebration at a Syriac Orthodox monastery in Mosul, Ottoman Syria (now Iraq), early 20th century
Holy Qurobo in Mar Thoma Syrian Church
Maronite cross.

It is one of two main liturgical rites of Syriac Christianity, the other being the East Syriac Rite.

- West Syriac Rite

The West Syriac Rite (also called Antiochian Syriac Rite or St. James Rite), which has the Divine Liturgy of Saint James as its anaphora, is that of the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Lebanon-based Maronite Church and Syriac Catholic Church, and the Indian Syro-Malankara Catholic Church, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, Jacobite Syrian Christian Church (part of the Syriac Orthodox Church), Malabar Independent Syrian Church.

- Syriac Christianity

In the West Syriac Rite, used by the Syriac Orthodox Church, Malankara Mar Thoma Syrian Church, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, the Syriac Catholic Church, Syro-Malankara Catholic Church and in a hybrid form, the Maronite Church and other derived rites of Syriac Christianity, the Trisagion is sung towards the beginning of the Holy Qurbana (Divine Liturgy), after the Old Testament Readings and the Introductory Hymn.

- Trisagion
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Orthodox Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II

Prine recorded it 12 years earlier, for his 1986 album German Afternoons.

- I Just Want to Dance with You

Donnelly played guitar on John Prine's albums Aimless Love and German Afternoons.

- Philip Donnelly (musician)

8) "I Just Want to Dance with You" (Roger Cook, Prine) – 3:28

- German Afternoons
Present-day Middle-Eastern Syriac Christian denominations
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Orthodox Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II
East Syriac (Church of the East) metropolitan sees in Asia from the 9th to the 13th centuries
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Catholic Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Joseph III Yonan
An 11th-century Syriac manuscript
West Syriac dioceses of the Syriac Orthodox Church during the medieval period
Holy Qurobo in the Maronite Church
Syriac alphabet
Holy Qurbana of the Syriac Orthodox Church celebration of the Divine Liturgy of Saint James
A West Syriac Rite Holy Qurbono of the Jacobite Syrian Christian Church holding paterissa (crozier)
Late Syriac text, written in Madnhāyā script, from Thrissur, India (1799)
Present-day divisions of Saint Thomas Christians (also known as Syrian Christians)
A West Syriac Rite Holy Qurbono of the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church
Lord's Prayer in Syriac language
Celebration at a Syriac Orthodox monastery in Mosul, Ottoman Syria (now Iraq), early 20th century
Holy Qurobo in the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church
Ancient mosaic from Edessa (from the 2nd century CE) with inscriptions in early Edessan Aramaic (Old Syriac)
Holy Qurobo in Mar Thoma Syrian Church
Syriac "Codex Ambrosianus" (F. 128) from the 11th century
Maronite cross.
Bilingual Syriac and Neo-Persian psalter, in Syriac script, from the 12th-13th century
Although once a major language in the Fertile Crescent and Eastern Arabia, Syriac is now limited to the towns and villages in the Nineveh Plains, Tur Abdin, the Khabur plains, in and around the cities of Mosul, Erbil and Kirkuk.
Modern distribution of Neo-Aramaic languages, including Neo-Syriac groups
Īšoˁ, the Syriac pronunciation of the Hebrew and Aramaic name of Jesus, Yeshuʿ (ישוע)
Linguistic homeland of Edessan Aramaic: Kingdom of Osroene between Romans and Parthians, in the 1st century AD
A warning sign in Mardin, Turkey: šeṯqā, b-ḇāʿū (ܫܬܩܐ ܒܒܥܘ, 'Silence, please') in Syriac and Lütfen! Sessiz olalım! ('Please! Let's be quiet!') in Turkish.

Syriac Christianity ( / Mšiḥoyuṯo Suryoyto or Mšiḥāyūṯā Suryāyṯā) is a distinctive branch of Eastern Christianity, whose formative theological writings and traditional liturgies are expressed in the Classical Syriac language, a variation of the Aramaic language.

- Syriac Christianity

The West Syriac Rite, also called Syro-Antiochian Rite, is an Eastern Christian liturgical rite that employs the Divine Liturgy of Saint James in the West Syriac dialect.

- West Syriac Rite

As a liturgical language of Syriac Christianity, it gained a prominent role among Eastern Christian communities that used both Eastern Syriac and Western Syriac rites.

- Syriac language
Present-day Middle-Eastern Syriac Christian denominations
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Orthodox Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II
Syriac Catholic Cathedral of Saint Paul, a cathedral of the Syriac Catholic Church, in Damascus, Syria
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Catholic Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Joseph III Yonan
Syriac Catholic Church in Beyoğlu, Istanbul.
An 11th-century Syriac manuscript
Holy Qurobo in the Maronite Church
A map of the Syriac Catholic jurisdictions
Syriac alphabet
A West Syriac Rite Holy Qurbono of the Jacobite Syrian Christian Church holding paterissa (crozier)
The Syriac Catholic Fans look similar to this but with bells on the edges
Late Syriac text, written in Madnhāyā script, from Thrissur, India (1799)
A West Syriac Rite Holy Qurbono of the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church
Lord's Prayer in Syriac language
Holy Qurobo in the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church
Ancient mosaic from Edessa (from the 2nd century CE) with inscriptions in early Edessan Aramaic (Old Syriac)
Holy Qurobo in Mar Thoma Syrian Church
Syriac "Codex Ambrosianus" (F. 128) from the 11th century
Maronite cross.
Bilingual Syriac and Neo-Persian psalter, in Syriac script, from the 12th-13th century
Although once a major language in the Fertile Crescent and Eastern Arabia, Syriac is now limited to the towns and villages in the Nineveh Plains, Tur Abdin, the Khabur plains, in and around the cities of Mosul, Erbil and Kirkuk.
Modern distribution of Neo-Aramaic languages, including Neo-Syriac groups
Īšoˁ, the Syriac pronunciation of the Hebrew and Aramaic name of Jesus, Yeshuʿ (ישוע)
Linguistic homeland of Edessan Aramaic: Kingdom of Osroene between Romans and Parthians, in the 1st century AD
A warning sign in Mardin, Turkey: šeṯqā, b-ḇāʿū (ܫܬܩܐ ܒܒܥܘ, 'Silence, please') in Syriac and Lütfen! Sessiz olalım! ('Please! Let's be quiet!') in Turkish.

The West Syriac Rite, also called Syro-Antiochian Rite, is an Eastern Christian liturgical rite that employs the Divine Liturgy of Saint James in the West Syriac dialect.

- West Syriac Rite

The Syriac Catholic Church (, الكنيسة السريانية الكاثوليكية) is an Eastern Catholic Christian originating in the Levant that uses the West Syriac Rite liturgy and has many practices and rites in common with the Syriac Orthodox Church.

- Syriac Catholic Church

As a liturgical language of Syriac Christianity, it gained a prominent role among Eastern Christian communities that used both Eastern Syriac and Western Syriac rites.

- Syriac language
Celebration of the Holy Qurobo in the Syriac Orthodox Church led by Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II
Location of the historic Inner City within Budapest
Állatkert station, the old and the new M1 route map
red: official Inner City neighbourhood (old town of Pest)
orange: broader colloquial definition of inner city (inside the Nagykörút)
yellow: even broader definition
Andrássy Avenue with the Millennium Underground (1896)
150x150px
Completing the cut-and-cover construction
160x160px
A train near the Hősök tere (before 1973)
150x150px
Original rolling stock
122x122px
Opera
120x120px
Train-set at Vörösmarty square
150x150px
Station entry at Bajcsy-Zsilinszky út
Preserved heritage rolling stock at the museum
Line under construction at Oktogon
Old and new route map of M1 in City Park

Állatkert was an above-ground station of the M1 line of the Budapest Metro.

- Állatkert metro station

Line 1 runs northeast from the city center on the Pest side under Andrássy út to the Városliget, or City Park.

- Metro Line M1 (Budapest Metro)

The three Budapest Metro lines converge at Ferenc Deák Square where the Blue and Red lines meet the Millennium Underground Railway (yellow).

- Inner City (Budapest)
1951 Historical marker commemorating Tagaytay landing.
Aerial view of Calamba landing field, circa 1940s
Facade of the Cathedral Parish of Saint Paul the Hermit, San Pablo, Laguna
View of Taal Lake and Volcano from Tagaytay
Matang Tubig Cave, where American soldiers hid during World War II from 1942
Pineapple field in Tagaytay with a papaya tree and banana plants in the foreground.
CPIP in Barangay Batino
Aguinaldo Highway or Tagaytay City - Silang Junction
Jeepneys at the Calamba Central Terminal.
Tagaytay–Nasugbu Highway
Calamba Station
Tagaytay City Hall
CMC Medical Center & Tower in Barangay Real
Official Calamba City seal
Stop Light in Halang
Checkpoint, captured at Paseo De Calamba in Paciano Rizal
Calamba City Hall
Saint John Baptist Church (Calamba Church)
Calamba Claypot
Republic Wakepark Canlubang
Rizal Shrine
AMA Computer College Calamba White Bldg.
Asian Computer College Annex Bldg.
City College of Calamba
Citi Clobal College Annex
Don Bosco College, Canlubang
Laguna College Business and Arts
Liceo de Calamba
Mary Help of Christians, Canlubang
University of Perpetual Help System - Dalta
Xavier School Nuvali
 Saint Benilde International School (Calamba) Inc.
Dr. Jose Rizal
Delfina Herbosa de Natividad
Gen. Vicente Lim
Ronato "Ronnie" Alcano
Official Calamba City seal

Albeit discontinuous, it connects the city of Calamba in Laguna and the city of Tagaytay in Cavite.

- Tagaytay–Calamba Road

and the City of Tagaytay in Cavite.

- Calamba, Laguna

Secondary roads link the city with the adjoining municipalities of Amadeo, Mendez, Indang, Silang and Alfonso in Cavite towards the northwest, and to the cities of Calamba and Santa Rosa in Laguna in the northeast and to the town of Talisay in Batangas in the south.

- Tagaytay
1951 Historical marker commemorating Tagaytay landing.
Carcass in 2016
Equilibrium in 2016
Jeff Walker at Gods of Metal, Bologna, Italy (2008)
Equilibrium at Hellfest in 2017
Bill Steer at Gods of Metal, Bologna, Italy (2008)
Robert "Robse" Dahn
Michael Amott at Gods of Metal, Bologna, Italy (2008)
René Berthiaume
Carcass performing in 2015
Tuval "Hati" Refaeli
Dominik "Dom" Crey

German symphonic folk metal band from Bavaria.

- Equilibrium (band)

Lineup: Meshuggah, Carcass, Amon Amarth, Kataklysm, Behemoth, Tankard, Brainstorm, Rage, Skyforger, Ministry, Wintersun, Iced Earth, Helloween, Mystic Prophecy, Apocalyptica, Mercenary, In Flames, Finntroll, Subway to Sally, Drone, The Sorrow, Gorilla Monsoon, Alestorm, Sahg, Hate, Morbid Angel, Onslaught, Korpiklaani, Evergrey, Opeth, Six Feet Under, October file, In Extremo, S.A. Sanctuary, Exterminator, At the Lake, ArseA, Planet Rain

- Metaldays

Carcass also played at Hellfest Summer Open Air, Metalcamp and several other festivals.

- Carcass (band)
The Philadelphia Inquirer reported the capture of a "man-eating" shark off the Jersey Shore after the attacks.
Cover of the first hardcover edition, illustrated by Paul Bacon
U-Deutschland at Port of Baltimore, Maryland 10 July 1916, in an image from the New International Encyclopedia
Map of the Jersey Shore attacks
Peter Benchley was inspired by a shark being captured in Montauk, New York.
Deutschland unloading in New London, 1916.
Philadelphia Inquirer coverage of the attacks at Matawan, with portraits of Stanley Fisher (bottom right) and Lester Stilwell
Bantam Books requested a new cover for the paperback, and the now iconic art by Roger Kastel was reused for the Jaws film posters.
U-155 in London after World War I
German American Michael Schleisser and the great white shark caught in Raritan Bay purported to be the "Jersey man-eater", as seen in the Bronx Home News
Leading scientists of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City debated the threat posed by sharks before and after the 1916 Jersey Shore attacks

Blockade-breaking German merchant submarine used during World War I.

- German submarine Deutschland

Benchley was also partly inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916 where there were four recorded fatalities and one critical injury from shark attacks from July 1 through July 12, 1916.

- Jaws (novel)

The anonymous writer claimed, "These sharks may have devoured human bodies in the waters of the German war zone and followed liners to this coast, or even followed the Deutschland herself, expecting the usual toll of drowning men, women, and children."

- Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916
The Philadelphia Inquirer reported the capture of a "man-eating" shark off the Jersey Shore after the attacks.
Siege of Alès in June 1629.
Surrender of the city of Montauban, 21 August 1629. Château de Richelieu.
Areas controlled and contested by Huguenots are marked purple and blue on this map of modern France.
Redition of Montauban, 21 August 1629. Château de Richelieu.
Montauban during the 1621 Siege of Montauban.
Huguenot regions (purple) and royal intervention (red) between 1620 and 1622
Louis XIII arriving for the redition of Montauban, 1629 (detail).
Henri, duc de Rohan (1579–1638) was chosen as the leader of the rebellion.
Re-establishment of the Catholics in Béarn, Melchior Tavernier, 1620
Louis XIII in the failed siege of Montauban in 1621
Siege of Royan, 1622
Naval battle of Saint-Martin-de-Ré on 27 October 1622
Benjamin de Rohan, duc de Soubise led the occupation of Île de Ré in defiance of Louis XIII.
Capture of Île de Ré by Charles, Duke of Guise on September 16th, 1625.
Marshall Henri de Schomberg and Toiras vanquishing the English army of Buckingham at the end of the siege of Saint-Martin-de-Ré (1627)
Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle, Henri Motte, 1881
Siege of Alès in June 1629.

The redition was the final chapter of the Huguenot rebellions, as the remnants of Huguenot power in southern France surrendered to the king.

- Surrender of Montauban

The remaining Huguenot cities rapidly fell, and finally Montauban surrendered without resistance.

- Siege of Alès

Louis XIII finally captures Alès, in the siege of Alès in June 1629, and Rohan submitted.

- Huguenot rebellions
Siege of Alès in June 1629.