£sd

£shillings and pence per pounddpounds, shillings and penceshillingsspoundsshilling1dpenny
£sd (occasionally written Lsd, spoken as "pounds, shillings and pence" or pronounced /ɛlɛsˈdiː/ ell-ess-DEE) is the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies once common throughout Europe, especially in the British Isles and hence in several countries of the British Empire and subsequently the Commonwealth.wikipedia
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Shilling

sshillingss.
In the United Kingdom, which was one of the last to abandon the system, these were referred to as pounds, shillings, and pence (pence being the plural of penny).
One abbreviation for shilling is s (for solidus, see £sd).

Pound sterling

£GBPpounds
In the United Kingdom, which was one of the last to abandon the system, these were referred to as pounds, shillings, and pence (pence being the plural of penny).
In the British pre-decimal (duodecimal) currency system, the term £sd (or Lsd) for pounds, shillings and pence referred to the Roman words libra, solidus, and denarius.

Decimal Day

decimalisationdecimalizationdecimal currency
The UK abandoned the old penny on Decimal Day, 15 February 1971, when one pound sterling became divided into 100 new pence.
Decimal Day in the United Kingdom and in Ireland was on 15 February 1971, the day on which each country decimalised its respective £sd currency of pounds, shillings, and pence.

Penny (British decimal coin)

penceppenny
The UK abandoned the old penny on Decimal Day, 15 February 1971, when one pound sterling became divided into 100 new pence.
Prior to 1971, the United Kingdom had been using the pounds, shilling and pence currency system.

Roman currency

Roman coinsRoman coincoins
Historically, similar systems based on Roman coinage were used elsewhere; e.g., the division of the livre tournois in France and other pre-decimal currencies such as Spain, which had 20 maravedís to 1 real and 20 reals to 1 duro or 5 pesetas.
Roman currency names survive today in many countries (e.g., the Arabic dinar (from the denarius coin), the British pound and Mexican peso (both translations of the Roman libra)).

Decimalisation

decimal currencydecimaliseddecimalization
Still others, notably Ireland, decimalised only when the UK did.
(See £sd and Decimal Day.)

Australian pound

£A₤
As with other £sd currencies, it was subdivided into 20 shillings (symbol s), each of 12 pence (symbol d).

Nigerian pound

pound£
In Britain, it was King Offa of Mercia who adopted the Frankish silver standard of librae, solidi and denarii in the late 8th century, and the system was used in much of the British Commonwealth until the 1960s and 1970s, with Nigeria being the last to abandon it in the form of the Nigerian pound on 1 January 1973.
This made Nigeria the last country to abandon the £sd currency system.

Solidus (coin)

solidisolidussou
The abbreviation originates from the Latin currency denominations librae, solidi, and denarii.
Under the influence of the old long S, the abbreviations "£sd" eventually developed into the use of a slash, which gave rise to that symbol's ISO and Unicode name "solidus".

New Zealand dollar

NZ$NZD$
The pound used the £sd system, in which the pound was divided into 20 shillings and one shilling was divided into 12 pence, which by the 1950s was considered complicated and cumbersome.

Nigerian naira

nairaN
This made Nigeria the last former British colony to abandon the £sd currency system in favour of the decimal currency system.

Halfpenny (British pre-decimal coin)

halfpennyha'pennyhalfpennies
The penny was subdivided into 4 farthings until 31 December 1960, when they ceased to be legal tender in the UK, and until 31 July 1969 there were also halfpennies ("ha'pennies") in circulation.
The British pre-decimal halfpenny (1⁄2d) coin, usually simply known as a ha'penny (pronounced ), historically occasionally also as the obol and once abbreviated ‘ob’ (from the Latin ‘obulus’), was a unit of currency that equalled half of a penny or 1⁄480 of a pound sterling.

Coins of the pound sterling

British coinageBritish coinscompetition
These were the five pence (5p) and ten pence (10p), and had values of one shilling (1/-) and two shillings (2/-), respectively, under the pre-decimal £sd system.

Irish pound

IR££IEP
As with sterling, the £sd system was used, with the Irish names punt (plural: puint), scilling (plural: scillingí) and pingin (plural: pinginí).

Beer in Scotland

Scottish beerScottish aleScottish Real Ale
This is still seen in shilling categories of Scottish beer, such as 90/– beer.
The "/-" was the symbol used for "shillings exactly", that is, shillings and zero pence, in the pre-decimal £sd British currency, so the names are read as "60 (or 70 or 80) shilling ale".

Currency

currenciesforeign currencycoinage
£sd (occasionally written Lsd, spoken as "pounds, shillings and pence" or pronounced /ɛlɛsˈdiː/ ell-ess-DEE) is the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies once common throughout Europe, especially in the British Isles and hence in several countries of the British Empire and subsequently the Commonwealth.

British Isles

BritainBritishThe British Isles
£sd (occasionally written Lsd, spoken as "pounds, shillings and pence" or pronounced /ɛlɛsˈdiː/ ell-ess-DEE) is the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies once common throughout Europe, especially in the British Isles and hence in several countries of the British Empire and subsequently the Commonwealth.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
£sd (occasionally written Lsd, spoken as "pounds, shillings and pence" or pronounced /ɛlɛsˈdiː/ ell-ess-DEE) is the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies once common throughout Europe, especially in the British Isles and hence in several countries of the British Empire and subsequently the Commonwealth.

Denarius

denariidenaridinara
The abbreviation originates from the Latin currency denominations librae, solidi, and denarii.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
In the United Kingdom, which was one of the last to abandon the system, these were referred to as pounds, shillings, and pence (pence being the plural of penny).

Penny

pencedpennies
In the United Kingdom, which was one of the last to abandon the system, these were referred to as pounds, shillings, and pence (pence being the plural of penny).

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
This system originated in the classical Roman Empire.

Charlemagne

Charles the GreatEmperor CharlemagneCharles
It was re-introduced into Western Europe by Charlemagne, and was the standard for many centuries across the continent.

Offa of Mercia

OffaKing OffaOffa, King of Mercia
In Britain, it was King Offa of Mercia who adopted the Frankish silver standard of librae, solidi and denarii in the late 8th century, and the system was used in much of the British Commonwealth until the 1960s and 1970s, with Nigeria being the last to abandon it in the form of the Nigerian pound on 1 January 1973.

Commonwealth of Nations

CommonwealthBritish CommonwealthCommonwealth countries
In Britain, it was King Offa of Mercia who adopted the Frankish silver standard of librae, solidi and denarii in the late 8th century, and the system was used in much of the British Commonwealth until the 1960s and 1970s, with Nigeria being the last to abandon it in the form of the Nigerian pound on 1 January 1973. £sd (occasionally written Lsd, spoken as "pounds, shillings and pence" or pronounced /ɛlɛsˈdiː/ ell-ess-DEE) is the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies once common throughout Europe, especially in the British Isles and hence in several countries of the British Empire and subsequently the Commonwealth.