Ébéniste

ebonistcabinet makercabinet-makingcabinetmakerébéniste du roi
Ébéniste is a loanword (from French) for a cabinet-maker, particularly one who works in ebony.wikipedia
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Pierre Golle

Pierre Gole
Early Parisian ébénistes often came from the Low Countries themselves; an outstanding example is Pierre Golle, who worked at the Gobelins manufactory making cabinets and table tops veneered with marquetry, the traditional enrichment of ébénisterie, or "cabinet-work".
Pierre Golle (ca 1620, Bergen, North Holland – 27 November 1684) was an influential Parisian ébéniste (cabinet maker), of Dutch extraction.

Ebony

eboniesebony woodblack wood
Ébéniste is a loanword (from French) for a cabinet-maker, particularly one who works in ebony.
Within a short time, such cabinets were also being made in Paris, where their makers became known as ébénistes, which remains the French term for a cabinetmaker.

Pierre-Antoine Bellangé

Pierre-Antoine BellangeBellangé
Pierre-Antoine Bellangé (1757–1827) was a French ébéniste (cabinetmaker) working in Paris.

Guillaume Beneman

Guillaume Beneman or Benneman (1750 after 1811 ) was a prominent Parisian ébéniste, one of several of German extraction, working in the early neoclassical Louis XVI style, which was already fully developed when he arrived in Paris.

Joseph Baumhauer

Joseph Baumhauer (died 22 March 1772) was a prominent Parisian ébéniste, one of several of German extraction.

Martin Carlin

1730–1785) was a Parisian ébéniste (cabinet-maker), born at Freiburg, who was received as Master Ébéniste at Paris on 30 July 1766.

Marquetry

inlaidinlaid woodWood Inlay
Early Parisian ébénistes often came from the Low Countries themselves; an outstanding example is Pierre Golle, who worked at the Gobelins manufactory making cabinets and table tops veneered with marquetry, the traditional enrichment of ébénisterie, or "cabinet-work".
Early masters of French marquetry were the Fleming Pierre Golle and his son-in-law, André-Charles Boulle, who founded a dynasty of royal and Parisian cabinet-makers (ébénistes) and gave his name to a technique of marquetry employing tortoiseshell and brass with pewter in arabesque or intricately foliate designs.

Mathieu Criaerd

Mathieu Criaerd (1689 — 1776) was the most prominent of a large family of cabinetmakers (ébénistes), apparently of Flemish ancestry, who were working in Paris during the 18th century.

Jacques-Philippe Carel

Jacques-Philippe Carel (working c1723 — c1760) was a Parisian cabinet-maker (ébéniste), who was admitted to the cabinetmakers' guild in 1723 and specialized in rococo case pieces of high quality veneered in end-grain (bois de bout) floral marquetry.

Jean-Pierre Latz

1691 – Paris, 4 August 1754 ) was one of the handful of truly outstanding cabinetmakers (ébénistes) working in Paris in the mid-18th century.

Adrien Delorme

Delormes
Adrien Faizelot-Delorme (master in 1748 – after 1783) was a well-known cabinetmaker (ébéniste) working in Paris, the most prominent in a family of ébénistes

Antoine Gaudreau

Antoine-Robert Gaudreau
1680 – 6 May 1746) was a Parisian ébéniste who was appointed Ébéniste du Roi and was the principal supplier of furniture for the royal châteaux during the early years of Louis XV's reign.

Pierre Macret

Pierre Macret (1727–1796) was a well-known Parisian cabinetmaker (ébéniste).

Roger Vandercruse Lacroix

Roger Vandercruse Lacroix (1728–1799), often known as Roger Vandercruse, was a Parisian ébéniste whose highly refined furniture spans the rococo and the early neoclassical styles.

Jean Henri Riesener

Jean-Henri RiesenerRiesener
Jean-Henri Riesener (Johann Heinrich Riesener; 4 July 1734 – 6 January 1806) was a famous German ébéniste (cabinetmaker), working in Paris, whose work exemplified the early neoclassical "Louis XVI style".

François-Honoré-Georges Jacob-Desmalter

Jacob-DesmalterJacob DesmalterJacob-style
Freed from the Parisian guild restrictions of the Ancien Régime, the workshop was now able to produce veneered case-pieces (ébénisterie) in addition to turned and carved seat furniture (menuiserie).

André Charles Boulle

André-Charles BoulleBoulleAndre-Charles Boulle
Boulle received the deceased Jean Macé's lodgings on the recommendation of the Minister of Arts, Jean-Baptiste Colbert, who described Boulle as le plus habile ébéniste de Paris.

Cabinetry

cabinetmakercabinet makercabinet
Ébéniste is a loanword (from French) for a cabinet-maker, particularly one who works in ebony.

Jean-François Oeben

OebenJean Francis OebenJean Francois Oeben
Heinsberg near Aachen – Paris 21 January 1763) was a German ébéniste (cabinetmaker) whose career was spent in Paris.

Jean-François Leleu

Jean-Francois Leleu
Jean-François Leleu (1729 - 1807) was a leading French furniture-maker (ébéniste) of the eighteenth century.

Bernard II van Risamburgh

B.V.R.B.
Bernard II van Risamburgh, sometimes Risen Burgh (working by c 1730 — before February 1767 ) was a Parisian ébéniste of Dutch and French extraction, one of the outstanding cabinetmakers working in the Rococo style.

Bernard Molitor

After marrying the daughter of a charpentier du roi (carpenter of the king) in 1787, he became maître ébéniste (master Ébéniste) and member of the guild of cabinet-makers.

Gilles-Marie Oppenordt

Gilles-Marie OppenordOppenordJean Oppenord
His father Alexandre-Jean Oppenord (1639–1713) was an ébéniste, born Cander-Johan Oppen Oordt at Guelders, one of numerous cabinet-makers from the Low Countries who were drawn to Paris by the opportunity of patronage; the elder Oppenord was naturalized in 1679, when he was a menuisier en ebène ("furniture-maker in ebony") at the Manufacture Royale des Gobelins; in 1684 the elder Oppenord was appointed an ébéniste du Roi, with official lodgings in the Galeries du Louvre that had been perquisites in the royal gift of outstanding craftsmen in the luxury trades since the time of king Henri IV.

François Linke

Linke & Cie
François Linke (1855–1946) was a leading Parisian ébéniste of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Adam Weisweiler

Adam Weisweiler (c.1750 — after 1810 ) was a pre-eminent French master cabinetmaker (ébéniste) in the Louis XVI period, working in Paris.