École des ponts ParisTech

École Nationale des Ponts et ChausséesÉcole des Ponts et ChausséesEcole Nationale des Ponts et ChausséesENPCEcole des Ponts et ChausséesÉcole des PontsPonts et ChausséesEcole des Ponts ParisTechÉcole royale des ponts et chausséesEcole des Ponts et Chaussees
École des Ponts ParisTech (originally called École nationale des ponts et chaussées or ENPC, also nicknamed Ponts) is a university-level institution of higher education and research in the field of science, engineering and technology.wikipedia
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Grandes écoles

grande écoleGrandes EcolesGrande Ecole
Founded in 1747 by Daniel-Charles Trudaine, it is one of the oldest and one of the most prestigious French Grandes Écoles.
Their forerunners were schools aimed at graduating civil servants, such as technical officers (Ecole d'Arts et Métiers, renamed Arts et Métiers ParisTech, established in 1780), mine supervisors (École des mines de Paris established in 1783), bridge and road engineers (École royale des ponts et chaussées established in 1747), and shipbuilding engineers (École des ingénieurs-constructeurs des vaisseaux royaux established in 1741).

Paris School of Economics

PSEÉcole d'économie de Paris
It is headquartered in Marne-la-Vallée (suburb of Paris), France, and is a founding member of ParisTech (Paris Institute of Technology) and of the Paris School of Economics.
PSE is a brainchild of the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS, where the students are enrolled primarily), the École Normale Supérieure and the École des Ponts, and it is physically located on the ENS campus of Jourdan in the 14th arrondissement of Paris.

Marne-la-Vallée

Marne la ValléeMarne-la-Vallée, FranceMarne La Vallee
It is headquartered in Marne-la-Vallée (suburb of Paris), France, and is a founding member of ParisTech (Paris Institute of Technology) and of the Paris School of Economics.
Disneyland Paris, Disney Studio, Val d'Europe, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée, ESIEE Paris, and École des Ponts ParisTech are located in Marne-la-Vallée.

ParisTech

Paris Institute of TechnologyParisTech Schools
It is headquartered in Marne-la-Vallée (suburb of Paris), France, and is a founding member of ParisTech (Paris Institute of Technology) and of the Paris School of Economics.
Some deliver a high-level, broad education in science such as Arts et Métiers ParisTech, MINES ParisTech, École des Ponts ParisTech, ENSTA ParisTech, whereas others provide a deeper, research-focused level of expertise in select scientific disciplines, such as AgroParisTech (life, food and environmental sciences), TELECOM ParisTech (telecommunications), Chimie ParisTech (chemistry), ESPCI Paris (physics, chemistry and biology), Institut d'Optique Graduate School (physics and optics), ENSAE ParisTech (Economy, Statistics & Finance).

Daniel-Charles Trudaine

de TrudaineTrudaine
Founded in 1747 by Daniel-Charles Trudaine, it is one of the oldest and one of the most prestigious French Grandes Écoles.
He founded the École nationale des ponts et chaussées (School of Civil Engineering) in 1747, with Jean-Rodolphe Perronet, engineer of the généralité of Alençon, as its head.

Jean-Rodolphe Perronet

Jean Rodolphe PerronetJean-Rodolph PerronnetJean-Rodolphe Perronnet
The school's first director, from 1747 until 1794, was Jean-Rodolphe Perronet, engineer, civil service administrator and a contributor to the Encyclopédie of Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d'Alembert.
The Bureau became the Bureau des élèves des ponts et chaussées, then in 1775 was renamed the École des ponts et chaussées.

Augustin-Jean Fresnel

FresnelAugustin FresnelAugustin Jean Fresnel
During the First French Empire run by Napoleon I from 1804 to 1814, a number of members of the Corps of Bridges and Roads (including Barré de Saint-Venant, Belgrand, Biot, Cauchy, Coriolis, Dupuit, Fresnel, Gay-Lussac, Navier, Vicat) took part in the reconstruction of the French road network that had not been maintained during the Revolution, and in large infrastructural developments, notably hydraulic projects.
Graduating in 1806, he then enrolled at the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées (National School of Bridges and Roads, also known as "ENPC" or "École des Ponts"), from which he graduated in 1809, entering the service of the Corps des Ponts et Chaussées as an ingénieur ordinaire aspirant (ordinary engineer in training).

Eugène Freyssinet

FreyssinetEugene FreyssinetFreyssinet International
At this time, in France, the remarkable development of transports, roads, bridges and canals is strongly influenced by engineers from the school (Becquerel, Bienvenüe, Caquot, Carnot, Colson, Coyne, Freyssinet, Résal, Séjourné), who deeply modernised the country by creating the large traffic networks, admired in several European countries.
He worked in the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in Paris, France where he designed several bridges until the First World War intervened.

Claude-Louis Navier

NavierClaude NavierClaude Louis Marie Henri Navier
During the First French Empire run by Napoleon I from 1804 to 1814, a number of members of the Corps of Bridges and Roads (including Barré de Saint-Venant, Belgrand, Biot, Cauchy, Coriolis, Dupuit, Fresnel, Gay-Lussac, Navier, Vicat) took part in the reconstruction of the French road network that had not been maintained during the Revolution, and in large infrastructural developments, notably hydraulic projects.
In 1802, Navier enrolled at the École polytechnique, and in 1804 continued his studies at the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, from which he graduated in 1806.

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

Gay-LussacJoseph-Louis Gay-LussacJoseph Gay-Lussac
During the First French Empire run by Napoleon I from 1804 to 1814, a number of members of the Corps of Bridges and Roads (including Barré de Saint-Venant, Belgrand, Biot, Cauchy, Coriolis, Dupuit, Fresnel, Gay-Lussac, Navier, Vicat) took part in the reconstruction of the French road network that had not been maintained during the Revolution, and in large infrastructural developments, notably hydraulic projects.
Three years later, Gay-Lussac transferred to the École des Ponts et Chaussées, and shortly afterward was assigned to C. L. Berthollet as his assistant.

Albert Caquot

CaquotCaquot balloonsCaquot Type R
At this time, in France, the remarkable development of transports, roads, bridges and canals is strongly influenced by engineers from the school (Becquerel, Bienvenüe, Caquot, Carnot, Colson, Coyne, Freyssinet, Résal, Séjourné), who deeply modernised the country by creating the large traffic networks, admired in several European countries.

Henri Becquerel

Antoine Henri BecquerelBecquerelAntoine Becquerel
At this time, in France, the remarkable development of transports, roads, bridges and canals is strongly influenced by engineers from the school (Becquerel, Bienvenüe, Caquot, Carnot, Colson, Coyne, Freyssinet, Résal, Séjourné), who deeply modernised the country by creating the large traffic networks, admired in several European countries.
He studied engineering at the École Polytechnique and the École des Ponts et Chaussées.

Gaspard de Prony

Gaspard Riche de PronyBaron de Pronyde Prony
Under the orders of the emperor, French scientist Gaspard Riche de Prony, second director of the school from 1798 to 1839, adapts the education provided by the school in order to improve the training of future civil engineers, whose purpose is to rebuild the major infrastructures of the country: roads, bridges, but also administrative buildings, barracks and fortifications.
He was Engineer-in-Chief of the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées.

Louis Vicat

Vicat
During the First French Empire run by Napoleon I from 1804 to 1814, a number of members of the Corps of Bridges and Roads (including Barré de Saint-Venant, Belgrand, Biot, Cauchy, Coriolis, Dupuit, Fresnel, Gay-Lussac, Navier, Vicat) took part in the reconstruction of the French road network that had not been maintained during the Revolution, and in large infrastructural developments, notably hydraulic projects.
He graduated from École Polytechnique 1804 and École des Ponts et Chaussées 1806.

Paul Séjourné

Séjourné
At this time, in France, the remarkable development of transports, roads, bridges and canals is strongly influenced by engineers from the school (Becquerel, Bienvenüe, Caquot, Carnot, Colson, Coyne, Freyssinet, Résal, Séjourné), who deeply modernised the country by creating the large traffic networks, admired in several European countries.
Paul Séjourné graduated from the École polytechnique in 1873 and the civil engineering grande école École nationale des Ponts et Chaussées (ENPC) in 1876, he was appointed Ingénieur des ponts et chaussées in Mende in 1877, then in Toulouse in 1890.

Corps of Bridges, Waters and Forests

Corps des Ponts et ChausséesCorps of Bridges and Roadsingénieur des ponts et chaussées
Following the creation of the Corps of Bridges and Roads in 1716, the King's Council decided in 1747 to found a specific training course for the state's engineers, as École royale des ponts et chaussées.
Most of them are from École polytechnique, where they are selected based on their ranking, and from AgroParisTech where they are selected based on an entrance exam, others are from École normale supérieure (Ulm) or the regular curriculum of the École des ponts ParisTech.

Gaspard-Gustave de Coriolis

Gaspard-Gustave CoriolisCoriolisGustave-Gaspard Coriolis
During the First French Empire run by Napoleon I from 1804 to 1814, a number of members of the Corps of Bridges and Roads (including Barré de Saint-Venant, Belgrand, Biot, Cauchy, Coriolis, Dupuit, Fresnel, Gay-Lussac, Navier, Vicat) took part in the reconstruction of the French road network that had not been maintained during the Revolution, and in large infrastructural developments, notably hydraulic projects.
Upon the death of Claude-Louis Navier in 1836, Coriolis succeeded him in the chair of applied mechanics at the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées and to Navier's place in the Académie des Sciences.

Adhémar Jean Claude Barré de Saint-Venant

Saint-VenantBarré de Saint-VenantComte de Saint-Venant
During the First French Empire run by Napoleon I from 1804 to 1814, a number of members of the Corps of Bridges and Roads (including Barré de Saint-Venant, Belgrand, Biot, Cauchy, Coriolis, Dupuit, Fresnel, Gay-Lussac, Navier, Vicat) took part in the reconstruction of the French road network that had not been maintained during the Revolution, and in large infrastructural developments, notably hydraulic projects.
He went on to teach mathematics at the École des Ponts et Chaussées (National school of Bridges and Roads) where he succeeded Coriolis.

École des ingénieurs de la Ville de Paris

Ecole des ingenieurs de la Ville de ParisThe French School of Urban Engineering
member of the PRES Paris-Est, along with the École des Ponts.

École d'Architecture Marne-la-Vallée

Ecole d'Architecture, Ville et Territoires, Marne-la-ValléeÉcole d'architecture de la ville et des territoires à Marne-la-Vallée
It is located in the Marne-la-Vallée University campus and offers seminars with the ENPC (École nationale des ponts et chaussées) which is one of the historically acclaimed engineering schools in France.

Collège des Ingénieurs

College des Ingenieurs
In 1990, the Copernic Program was started, in cooperation with the French Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris, Ecole des Mines de Paris and ENPC.

Guy Béart

Guy Beart
When his father died in 1952, the young Béhart chose to pursue a career in engineering in order to help support his family, studying at the prestigious École nationale des ponts et chaussées.

Eugène Belgrand

Eugene BelgrandBelgrand
During the First French Empire run by Napoleon I from 1804 to 1814, a number of members of the Corps of Bridges and Roads (including Barré de Saint-Venant, Belgrand, Biot, Cauchy, Coriolis, Dupuit, Fresnel, Gay-Lussac, Navier, Vicat) took part in the reconstruction of the French road network that had not been maintained during the Revolution, and in large infrastructural developments, notably hydraulic projects.

Laurent-Emmanuel Calvet

Laurent E. Calvet
He obtained engineering degrees from École Polytechnique in 1991 and École des ponts ParisTech in 1994.

André Blondel

André-BlondelAndré-Eugène BlondelBlondel, André
He went on to attend the École nationale des ponts et chaussées (School of Bridges and Roadways) and graduated first in his class in 1888.