Éliphas Lévi

Eliphas LeviEliphas LéviAlphonse Louis ConstantAbbe ConstantAlphonse ConstantLevi, Eliphas
Éliphas Lévi Zahed, born Alphonse Louis Constant (8 February 1810 – 31 May 1875), was a French occult author and ceremonial magician.wikipedia
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Marie-Noémi Cadiot

An especially radical pamphlet, La voix de la famine (1846, The Voice of Famine), earned Constant another prison sentence that was significantly shortened at the request of his pregnant wife, Marie-Noémi Cadiot.
She was the second wife of Eliphas Levi and had a daughter with him; they later separated.

Flora Tristan

Tristán, Flora
Important friends at that time include, next to Esquiros, the feminist Flora Tristan, the eccentric socialist mystic Simon Ganneau, and the socialist Charley Fauvety.
She made the analogy between the proletariat to the bourgeoisie and the wife to the family before Friedrich Engels, as is referenced in a posthumous collection of her notes by Abbe Constant entitled The Emancipation of Woman and the Testament of the Pariah: “The most oppressed man finds a being to oppress, his wife: she is the proletarian of the proletarian.” Tristan's analogy is also more articulate than Engels'.

Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris

Saint-SulpiceChurch of Saint-SulpiceÉglise Saint-Sulpice
In 1832 he entered the seminary of Saint Sulpice to study to enter the Roman Catholic priesthood, but he fell in love and left in 1836 without being ordained.
The fashionable public side of Saint-Sulpice inspired Joris-Karl Huysmans perversely to set action there in his 1891 novel Là-Bas, dealing with Satanism in which the ritual magician "Eliphas Levi" attended the seminary attached to the church.

Pentagram

pentagrams{5/2}five-pointed star
He was also the first to declare that a pentagram or five-pointed star with one point down and two points up represents evil, while a pentagram with one point up and two points down represents good.

A. E. Waite

Arthur Edward WaiteA.E. WaiteWaite
A different narrative was developed independently by Arthur Edward Waite, who had even less information about Constant's life.
In 1881 Waite discovered the writings of Eliphas Levi.

Gérard Encausse

PapusGerard EncausseGérard Encausse, ''Papus
According to the narrative developed by the occultist Papus (Gérard Encausse) and cemented by the occultist biographer Paul Chacornac, Constant's turn to occultism was the result of an "initiation" by the eccentric Polish expatriate Józef Maria Hoene-Wroński.
As a young man, Encausse spent a great deal of time at the Bibliothèque Nationale studying the Kabbalah, occult tarot, magic and alchemy, and the writings of Eliphas Lévi.

Fourierism

FourieristFourieristsAssociationism
In the course of the 1840s, Constant developed close ties to the Fourierist movement, publishing in Fourierist publications and praising Fourierism as the "true Christianity".
Eliphas Lévi, who is regarded as the founder of modern occultism, was a pronounced adherent of Fourierism in the 1840s.

Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie

Dogme et rituelTranscendental Magic, its Doctrine and Ritual
Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie (Dogma and Ritual of High Magic) is the title of Éliphas Lévi's first published treatise on ritual magic, which appeared in two volumes between 1854 (Dogme) and 1856 (Rituel).

Aleister Crowley

CrowleyCrowley, Aleister Aleister Crowley: The Beast 666
He had a deep impact on the magic of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and later on the ex-Golden Dawn member Aleister Crowley.
Here, he began a translation of the Tao Te Ching, painted Thelemic slogans on the riverside cliffs, and—he later claimed—experienced past life memories of being Ge Xuan, Pope Alexander VI, Alessandro Cagliostro, and Eliphas Levi.

Occult

occultismoccultistoccultists
Éliphas Lévi Zahed, born Alphonse Louis Constant (8 February 1810 – 31 May 1875), was a French occult author and ceremonial magician.
The term occultism emerged in 19th-century France, where it came to be associated with various French esoteric groups connected to Éliphas Lévi and Papus, and in 1875 was introduced into the English language by the esotericist Helena Blavatsky.

The Case of Charles Dexter Ward

Charles Dexter WardCase of Charles Dexter WardDr. Willett house, 10 Barnes Street
When Dexter's mother hears chanting ("per adonai eloim, adonai jehova, adonai sabaoth, metraton on agla mathon, verbum pythonicum, mysterium salamandrae, conventus, antra gnomorum, daemonia coeli gad, almousin, gibor, jehosua, evam, zariatnatmik, veni, veni, veni."), the chanting is quoted (along with many other incantations in the story) from Eliphas Levi's Transcendental Magic, which translates the passage as “By Adonaï Eloïm, Adonaï Jehova, Adonai Sabaoth, Metraton On Agla Adonaï Mathon, the pythonic word, the mystery of the salamander, the assembly of sylphs, the grotto of gnomes, the demons of the heaven of Gad, Almousin, Gibor, Jehosua, Evam, Zariatnatmik, Come, Come, Come!" The incantation invokes several divine names, such as Adonai, Eloim, and Jehova, and references the Salamander, Sylphs, and Gnomes, which are the alchemical representatives of Fire, Air, and Earth respectively, as described by Paracelsus.

Józef Maria Hoene-Wroński

Josef Hoëné-WronskiHoene WrońskiHoene-Wroński
According to the narrative developed by the occultist Papus (Gérard Encausse) and cemented by the occultist biographer Paul Chacornac, Constant's turn to occultism was the result of an "initiation" by the eccentric Polish expatriate Józef Maria Hoene-Wroński.
In 1852, shortly before his death, he did find a willing audience for his ideas: the occultist Eliphas Levi who met Wroński and was greatly impressed and "attracted by his religious and scientific utopianism."

Ceremonial magic

ritual magicmagicianceremonial magician
Eliphas Lévi conceived the notion of writing a treatise on magic with his friend Bulwer-Lytton.

Victor Hennequin

The occult writer Eliphas Levi presents the case of Victor Hennequin as an example of the dangers of trying to develop mediumistic powers.

Translation

translatortranslatedtranslators
"Éliphas Lévi", the name under which he published his books, was his attempt to translate or transliterate his given names "Alphonse Louis" into the Hebrew language.

Transliteration

translit.transliteratedtransliterate
"Éliphas Lévi", the name under which he published his books, was his attempt to translate or transliterate his given names "Alphonse Louis" into the Hebrew language.

Hebrew language

HebrewHebrew grammarHeb.
"Éliphas Lévi", the name under which he published his books, was his attempt to translate or transliterate his given names "Alphonse Louis" into the Hebrew language.

Seminary

theological collegeseminariesseminarian
In 1832 he entered the seminary of Saint Sulpice to study to enter the Roman Catholic priesthood, but he fell in love and left in 1836 without being ordained.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
In 1832 he entered the seminary of Saint Sulpice to study to enter the Roman Catholic priesthood, but he fell in love and left in 1836 without being ordained.

Priesthood in the Catholic Church

priestpriesthoodCatholic priest
In 1832 he entered the seminary of Saint Sulpice to study to enter the Roman Catholic priesthood, but he fell in love and left in 1836 without being ordained.

Gérard de Nerval

NervalGerard de NervalNerval, Gérard de
He spent the following years among his socialist and Romantic friends, including Henri-François-Alphonse Esquiros and so-called petits romantiques such as Gérard de Nerval and Théophile Gautier.

Théophile Gautier

GautierTheophile GautierGautier, Théophile
He spent the following years among his socialist and Romantic friends, including Henri-François-Alphonse Esquiros and so-called petits romantiques such as Gérard de Nerval and Théophile Gautier.

Hugues Felicité Robert de Lamennais

LamennaisFélicité Robert de LamennaisFélicité de Lamennais
During this time he turned to a radical socialism that was decisively inspired by the writings of Félicité de Lamennais, the former leader of the influential neo-Catholic movement who had recently broken with Rome and propagated a Christian socialism.

Joseph de Maistre

de MaistreMaistre[Joseph de Maistre
He also turned to the writings of the Catholic traditionalist Joseph de Maistre, whose writings were highly popular in socialist circles.

French Revolution of 1848

Revolution of 18481848 RevolutionFebruary Revolution
In his Testament de la liberté (1848), Constant reacted to the atmosphere that would produce the February Revolution.