Émile Durkheim

DurkheimEmile DurkheimDurkheimianDurkheim, ÉmileDavid Émile DurkheimDurkeheimianDurkheim, E
David Émile Durkheim ( or ; 15 April 1858 – 15 November 1917) was a French sociologist.wikipedia
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Max Weber

WeberWeberianWeber, Max
He formally established the academic discipline of sociology and—with W. E. B. Du Bois, Karl Marx and Max Weber—is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science.
Weber is often cited, with Émile Durkheim and Karl Marx, as among the three founders of sociology.

The Division of Labour in Society

The Division of Labor in SocietyDivision of LaborDivision of Labour in Society
His first major sociological work was The Division of Labour in Society (1893).
The Division of Labour in Society (De la division du travail social) is the doctoral dissertation of the French sociologist Émile Durkheim, published in 1893.

The Rules of Sociological Method

Rules of the Sociological MethodThe Rules of the Sociological Method
In 1895, he published The Rules of Sociological Method and set up the first European department of sociology, becoming France's first professor of sociology.
The Rules of Sociological Method (Les Règles de la Méthode Sociologique) is a book by Émile Durkheim, first published in 1895.

Suicide (Durkheim book)

SuicideLe Suicidestudy of suicide
Durkheim's seminal monograph, Suicide (1897), a study of suicide rates in Catholic and Protestant populations, pioneered modern social research and served to distinguish social science from psychology and political philosophy.
Suicide (Le suicide) is an 1897 book written by French sociologist Émile Durkheim.

Social research and methods

social researchsociological researchsociological analysis
Durkheim's seminal monograph, Suicide (1897), a study of suicide rates in Catholic and Protestant populations, pioneered modern social research and served to distinguish social science from psychology and political philosophy.
Statistical sociological research, and indeed the formal academic discipline of sociology, began with the work of Émile Durkheim (1858–1917).

Social science

social sciencessocial scientistsocial
He formally established the academic discipline of sociology and—with W. E. B. Du Bois, Karl Marx and Max Weber—is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science.
Another route undertaken was initiated by Émile Durkheim, studying "social facts", and Vilfredo Pareto, opening metatheoretical ideas and individual theories.

Sociology of knowledge

phenomenological sociology of knowledgeknowledgesociological perspective
He remained a dominant force in French intellectual life until his death in 1917, presenting numerous lectures and published works on a variety of topics, including the sociology of knowledge, morality, social stratification, religion, law, education, and deviance.
The sociology of knowledge was pioneered primarily by the sociologist Émile Durkheim at the beginning of the 20th century.

L'Année Sociologique

Année SociologiqueAnnee Sociologique
In 1898, he established the journal L'Année Sociologique.
L'Année Sociologique is an academic journal of sociology established in 1898 by Émile Durkheim, who also served as its editor.

Sociology of religion

sociologist of religionsociologists of religionreligion
He remained a dominant force in French intellectual life until his death in 1917, presenting numerous lectures and published works on a variety of topics, including the sociology of knowledge, morality, social stratification, religion, law, education, and deviance.
Modern academic sociology began with the analysis of religion in Émile Durkheim's 1897 study of suicide rates among Catholic and Protestant populations, a foundational work of social research which served to distinguish sociology from other disciplines, such as psychology.

Collective consciousness

hive mindgroup mindcollective conscience
Durkheimian terms such as "collective consciousness" have since entered the popular lexicon.
The term was introduced by the French sociologist Émile Durkheim in his The Division of Labour in Society in 1893.

Auguste Comte

ComteComteanAuguste Compte
He refined the positivism originally set forth by Auguste Comte, promoting what could be considered as a form of epistemological realism, as well as the use of the hypothetico-deductive model in social science.
His concept of sociologie and social evolutionism set the tone for early social theorists and anthropologists such as Harriet Martineau and Herbert Spencer, evolving into modern academic sociology presented by Émile Durkheim as practical and objective social research.

Marcel Mauss

MaussMauss, Marcel
Marcel Mauss, a notable social anthropologist of the pre-war era, was his nephew. Scholars inspired by Durkheim include Marcel Mauss, Maurice Halbwachs, Célestin Bouglé, Gustave Belot, Alfred Radcliffe-Brown, Talcott Parsons, Robert K. Merton, Jean Piaget, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Ferdinand de Saussure, Michel Foucault, Clifford Geertz, Peter Berger, Robert N. Bellah, social reformer Patrick Hunout and others.
The nephew of Émile Durkheim, Mauss' academic work traversed the boundaries between sociology and anthropology.

Structural functionalism

functionalismfunctionalistsocial function
Durkheim was a major proponent of structural functionalism, a foundational perspective in both sociology and anthropology.
Émile Durkheim was concerned with the question of how certain societies maintain internal stability and survive over time.

Épinal

EpinalÉpinal, France
Emile Durkheim was born in Épinal in Lorraine, the son of Mélanie (Isidor) and Moïse Durkheim.

Maurice Bloch

M. E. F. Bloch
One of his nieces was Claudette (née Raphael) Bloch, a marine biologist and mother of Maurice Bloch, who became a noted anthropologist.
His grandmother was a niece of sociologist Emile Durkheim and a much younger first cousin of anthropologist Marcel Mauss.

Sociology of law

Sociological jurisprudencelegal sociologylaw and society
He remained a dominant force in French intellectual life until his death in 1917, presenting numerous lectures and published works on a variety of topics, including the sociology of knowledge, morality, social stratification, religion, law, education, and deviance.
The relationship between law and society was sociologically explored in the seminal works of both Max Weber and Émile Durkheim.

Sociology of education

educational sociologyeducationeducation system
He remained a dominant force in French intellectual life until his death in 1917, presenting numerous lectures and published works on a variety of topics, including the sociology of knowledge, morality, social stratification, religion, law, education, and deviance.
Systematic sociology of education began with the work of Émile Durkheim (1858–1917) on moral education as a basis for organic solidarity, and with studies by Max Weber (1864–1920) on the Chinese literati as an instrument of political control.

Deviance (sociology)

deviancedeviantdeviant behavior
He remained a dominant force in French intellectual life until his death in 1917, presenting numerous lectures and published works on a variety of topics, including the sociology of knowledge, morality, social stratification, religion, law, education, and deviance.
Émile Durkheim claimed that deviance was in fact a normal and necessary part of social organization.

Sociology

sociologistsociologicalsociologists
David Émile Durkheim ( or ; 15 April 1858 – 15 November 1917) was a French sociologist.
So strong was his influence that many other 19th-century thinkers, including Émile Durkheim, defined their ideas in relation to his.

Wilhelm Wundt

WundtWilhelm Max WundtWilhelm Maximilian Wundt
Durkheim's period in Germany resulted in the publication of numerous articles on German social science and philosophy; Durkheim was particularly impressed by the work of Wilhelm Wundt.
– Students (or visitors) who were later to become well known included Vladimir Mikhailovich Bekhterev (Bechterev), Franz Boas, Émile Durkheim, Edmund Husserl, Bronisław Malinowski, George Herbert Mead, Edward Sapir, Ferdinand Tönnies, Benjamin Lee Whorf.

Charles Renouvier

Charles Bernard RenouvierRenouvier
During his university studies at the École, Durkheim was influenced by two neo-Kantian scholars, Charles Bernard Renouvier and Émile Boutroux.
He considered himself a "Swedenborg of history" who sought to update the philosophy of Kantian liberalism and individualism for the socio-economic realities of the late nineteenth century, and influenced the sociological method of Émile Durkheim.

Talcott Parsons

ParsonsParsonianParsons, Talcot
Scholars inspired by Durkheim include Marcel Mauss, Maurice Halbwachs, Célestin Bouglé, Gustave Belot, Alfred Radcliffe-Brown, Talcott Parsons, Robert K. Merton, Jean Piaget, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Ferdinand de Saussure, Michel Foucault, Clifford Geertz, Peter Berger, Robert N. Bellah, social reformer Patrick Hunout and others.
Some of Parsons' largest contributions to sociology in the English-speaking world were his translations of Max Weber's work and his analyses of works by Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Vilfredo Pareto.

Karl Marx

MarxMarx, KarlMarxist
He formally established the academic discipline of sociology and—with W. E. B. Du Bois, Karl Marx and Max Weber—is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science.
He has been cited as one of the 19th century's three masters of the "school of suspicion" alongside Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud and as one of the three principal architects of modern social science along with Émile Durkheim and Max Weber.

Positivism

positivistpositivisticpositivists
He refined the positivism originally set forth by Auguste Comte, promoting what could be considered as a form of epistemological realism, as well as the use of the hypothetico-deductive model in social science.
Émile Durkheim (1858–1917) reformulated sociological positivism as a foundation of social research.

Célestin Bouglé

Célestin Charles Alfred Bouglé
Scholars inspired by Durkheim include Marcel Mauss, Maurice Halbwachs, Célestin Bouglé, Gustave Belot, Alfred Radcliffe-Brown, Talcott Parsons, Robert K. Merton, Jean Piaget, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Ferdinand de Saussure, Michel Foucault, Clifford Geertz, Peter Berger, Robert N. Bellah, social reformer Patrick Hunout and others.
Célestin Charles Alfred Bouglé (1 June 1870 – 25 January 1940) was a French philosopher known for his role as one of Émile Durkheim's collaborators and a member of the L'Année Sociologique.