Ü-Tsang

TsangCentral TibetTsang ProvinceU-TsangUtsangÜgTsangTsang kingdomTsang regionTsangpo
Ü-Tsang or Tsang-Ü is one of the four traditional provinces of Tibet, the other being Amdo in the north-east, the Kham in the east and the Ngari (including former Guge kingdom) in the north-west.wikipedia
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Tibet

TibetanGreater TibetThibet
Ü-Tsang or Tsang-Ü is one of the four traditional provinces of Tibet, the other being Amdo in the north-east, the Kham in the east and the Ngari (including former Guge kingdom) in the north-west.
The bulk of western and central Tibet (Ü-Tsang) was often at least nominally unified under a series of Tibetan governments in Lhasa, Shigatse, or nearby locations; these governments were at various times under Mongol and Chinese overlordship.

Amdo

AndoAmdo TibetanAmdo, Tibet
Ü-Tsang or Tsang-Ü is one of the four traditional provinces of Tibet, the other being Amdo in the north-east, the Kham in the east and the Ngari (including former Guge kingdom) in the north-west.
Amdo ( [ʔam˥˥.to˥˥]; ) is one of the three traditional regions of Tibet, the other two being Ü-Tsang and Kham; it is also the birthplace of the 14th Dalai Lama.

Guge

Guge KingdomGugê National ParkKingdom of Guge
Ü-Tsang or Tsang-Ü is one of the four traditional provinces of Tibet, the other being Amdo in the north-east, the Kham in the east and the Ngari (including former Guge kingdom) in the north-west.
Nyi ma mgon, a great-grandson of Langdarma, the last monarch of the Tibetan Empire, left insecure conditions in Ü-Tsang in 910.

Ngari Prefecture

NgariAli PrefectureNgari Province
Ü-Tsang or Tsang-Ü is one of the four traditional provinces of Tibet, the other being Amdo in the north-east, the Kham in the east and the Ngari (including former Guge kingdom) in the north-west.
Later Ngari, along with Ü and Tsang, composed Ü-Tsang, one of the traditional provinces of Tibet, the others being Amdo and Kham.

Ü (region)

Üprovince of Üregion of Ü
Ü-Tsang was formed by the merging of two earlier power centers: Ü in central Tibet, controlled by the Gelug lineage of Tibetan Buddhism under the early Dalai Lamas, and Tsang which extended from Gyantse to points west, controlled by the rival Sakya lineage.
Together with Tsang (, gtsang), it forms Central Tibet Ü-Tsang (, dbus gtsang), which is one of the three Tibetan regions or cholka (cholka-sum).

Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan BuddhistTibetanTibetan Buddhists
Ü-Tsang was formed by the merging of two earlier power centers: Ü in central Tibet, controlled by the Gelug lineage of Tibetan Buddhism under the early Dalai Lamas, and Tsang which extended from Gyantse to points west, controlled by the rival Sakya lineage.
The minister family Rinpungpa, based in Tsang (West Central Tibet), dominated politics after 1435.

Dalai Lama

the Dalai LamaDalai LamasDalai
Ü-Tsang was formed by the merging of two earlier power centers: Ü in central Tibet, controlled by the Gelug lineage of Tibetan Buddhism under the early Dalai Lamas, and Tsang which extended from Gyantse to points west, controlled by the rival Sakya lineage. The dispute between Tsang kings, Karma Tenkyong Wangpo followers of karmapa and Khoshut khans, Güshi Khan, follower of gelugpa and Dalai Lamas ended by the rule on Tibet from the Potala and Norbulingka palaces in Lhasa from the last one.
'Pema Dorje' (1391–1474), the boy who was to become the first in the line, was born in a cattle pen in Shabtod, Tsang in 1391.

5th Dalai Lama

Fifth Dalai LamaLobsang GyatsoNgawang Lobsang Gyatso
Military victories by the powerful Khoshut Mongol Güshi Khan that backed 5th Dalai Lama and founded Ganden Phodrang government in 1642, consolidated power over the combined region, followed by the rule of the Qing Dynasty started in 1720 by the Qianlong Emperor that continued until the British expedition to Tibet (1903–1904).
Karma Phuntsok's grandfather Zhingshak Tseten Dorje (also known as Karma Tseten) had originally been appointed Governor of Tsang by the Rinpung Prime Minister Ngawang Namgyel in 1548.

Tibet under Qing rule

TibetQing rule of Tibetunder administrative rule
Military victories by the powerful Khoshut Mongol Güshi Khan that backed 5th Dalai Lama and founded Ganden Phodrang government in 1642, consolidated power over the combined region, followed by the rule of the Qing Dynasty started in 1720 by the Qianlong Emperor that continued until the British expedition to Tibet (1903–1904).
Güshi Khan of the Khoshut in 1641 overthrew the prince of Tsang and made the 5th Dalai Lama the highest spiritual and political authority in Tibet, establishing the regime known as Ganden Phodrang.

Rinpungpa

RinpungRinpungpa DynastyRinpungpa Principality
Ü-Tsang is the cultural heartland of the Tibetan people, originally governed by Rinpungpa dynasty.
Rinpungpa was a Tibetan regime that dominated much of Western Tibet and part of Ü-Tsang between 1435 and 1565.

Karma Tenkyong

Karma Tenkyong Wangpo
The dispute between Tsang kings, Karma Tenkyong Wangpo followers of karmapa and Khoshut khans, Güshi Khan, follower of gelugpa and Dalai Lamas ended by the rule on Tibet from the Potala and Norbulingka palaces in Lhasa from the last one.
Karma Tenkyong (1606 – Neu, Central Tibet, 1642), in full Karma Tenkyong Wangpo, was a king of Tibet who ruled from 1620 to 1642.

Tibet Autonomous Region

TibetXizangXizang Province
The present Tibet Autonomous Region corresponds approximately to what was ancient Ü-Tsang and western Kham.
Most Han people in the TAR (8.17% of the total population) are recent migrants, because all of the Han were expelled from "Outer Tibet" (Central Tibet) following the British invasion until the establishment of the PRC.

Tsangpa

Deb TsangpaKing of Tsangking of Tsaṅ
The Tsangpa dynasty had ruled the Tsang part between 1565 and 1642.
The regime was founded by Karma Tseten, a low-born retainer of the prince of the Rinpungpa Dynasty and governor of Shigatse in Tsang (West-Central Tibet) since 1548.

Tibetan people

TibetanTibetansethnic Tibetan
Ü-Tsang is the cultural heartland of the Tibetan people, originally governed by Rinpungpa dynasty.
The Central Tibetan language (the dialects of Ü-Tsang, including Lhasa), Khams Tibetan, and Amdo Tibetan are generally considered to be dialects of a single language, especially since they all share the same literary language, while Dzongkha, Sikkimese, Sherpa, and Ladakhi are generally considered to be separate languages.

Güshi Khan

Gushri KhanGusri KhanGüüshi Khan
Military victories by the powerful Khoshut Mongol Güshi Khan that backed 5th Dalai Lama and founded Ganden Phodrang government in 1642, consolidated power over the combined region, followed by the rule of the Qing Dynasty started in 1720 by the Qianlong Emperor that continued until the British expedition to Tibet (1903–1904). The dispute between Tsang kings, Karma Tenkyong Wangpo followers of karmapa and Khoshut khans, Güshi Khan, follower of gelugpa and Dalai Lamas ended by the rule on Tibet from the Potala and Norbulingka palaces in Lhasa from the last one.
Güshi proceeded to Ü-Tsang in 1638 as a pilgrim.

Shigatse

Shigatse PrefectureXigazêXigaze
Tsang, whose largest cities are Gyantse and Shigatse, near where the Panchen Lama has his traditional seat at Tashilhunpo Monastery, was designated on maps of the Qing dynasty as "Back Tibet", while Ü, where the Dalai Lama has his seat at Lhasa, was designated "Front Tibet".
It is located within the historical Tsang province of Tibet.

Panchen Lama

Panchen LamasPanchenTashi Lama
Tsang, whose largest cities are Gyantse and Shigatse, near where the Panchen Lama has his traditional seat at Tashilhunpo Monastery, was designated on maps of the Qing dynasty as "Back Tibet", while Ü, where the Dalai Lama has his seat at Lhasa, was designated "Front Tibet".
Traditionally, the Panchen Lama was the head of Tashilhunpo Monastery, and held religious and secular power over the Tsang region centered in Shigatse, independent of the Ganden Podrang authority led by Dalai Lama.

Central Tibetan language

Central TibetanLhomiTibetan
The Lhasa dialect is used as a lingua franca in Ü-Tsang and the Tibetan Exile koiné language is also based largely on it.

Qing dynasty

QingQing EmpireChina
Military victories by the powerful Khoshut Mongol Güshi Khan that backed 5th Dalai Lama and founded Ganden Phodrang government in 1642, consolidated power over the combined region, followed by the rule of the Qing Dynasty started in 1720 by the Qianlong Emperor that continued until the British expedition to Tibet (1903–1904). Tsang, whose largest cities are Gyantse and Shigatse, near where the Panchen Lama has his traditional seat at Tashilhunpo Monastery, was designated on maps of the Qing dynasty as "Back Tibet", while Ü, where the Dalai Lama has his seat at Lhasa, was designated "Front Tibet".

Tashi Lhunpo Monastery

Tashilhunpo MonasteryTashilhunpoTashilhünpo
Tsang, whose largest cities are Gyantse and Shigatse, near where the Panchen Lama has his traditional seat at Tashilhunpo Monastery, was designated on maps of the Qing dynasty as "Back Tibet", while Ü, where the Dalai Lama has his seat at Lhasa, was designated "Front Tibet".
After the death of a Panchen Lama, these four abbots led the search for his infant reincarnation and one of them always acted as a prime minister of Tsang under the control of the Dalai Lama in Lhasa.

Kham

Eastern TibetKhamsEast Tibet
Ü-Tsang or Tsang-Ü is one of the four traditional provinces of Tibet, the other being Amdo in the north-east, the Kham in the east and the Ngari (including former Guge kingdom) in the north-west. The present Tibet Autonomous Region corresponds approximately to what was ancient Ü-Tsang and western Kham.

Brahmaputra River

BrahmaputraRiver BrahmaputraBramhaputra
Geographically Ü-Tsang covered the south-central of the Tibetan cultural area, including the Brahmaputra River watershed.

Mount Kailash

KailashKailasaKailas
The western districts surrounding and extending past Mount Kailash are included in Ngari, and much of the vast Changtang plateau to the north.

Changtang

ChangthangChang TangChangtang Plateau
The western districts surrounding and extending past Mount Kailash are included in Ngari, and much of the vast Changtang plateau to the north.

Himalayas

HimalayaHimalayanHimalayan Mountains
The Himalayas defined Ü-Tsang's southern border.