-onym

glottonym-nymglossonyms-onym-suffixed wordsCaconymeuonymglossonymlinguonymnamesSuffix ''onym
The suffix -onym, in English and other languages, means "word, name", and words ending in -onym refer to a specified kind of name or word, most of which are classical compounds.wikipedia
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Capitonym

capitonymsonly difference is capitalisation
capitonym: a word that changes its meaning (and sometimes pronunciation) when it is capitalized, such as March and march or Polish and polish.
It is a portmanteau of the word capital with the suffix -onym.

Exonym and endonym

exonymendonymautonym
endonym: A self-assigned name by locals of a place. Also known as an autonym (not to be confused with the autonym in botany).
Exonyms and endonyms can be names of places (toponym), ethnic groups (ethnonym), languages (glossonym), or individuals (personal name).

Ananym

In the examples ananym and metanym, the correct forms (anonym and metonym) were pre-occupied by other meanings.
-nym

Opposite (semantics)

antonymantonymsopposite
antonym: a word with the exact opposite meaning of another word; an antithesis: often shown in opposite word pairs such as "high" and "low" (compare with "synonym")
-onym

Anthroponymy

anthroponymanthroponymicanthroponomastics
anthroponym: a name of a human being; as reflected in surnames or proper names of people
Suffix onym

Acronym

initialismacronymsinitials
For example, an acronym is a word formed from the initial letter or letters of each of the successive parts or major parts of a compound term (as radar).
-onym

Demonym

gentilicdemonymsinhabitants are called
demonym: a name, derived from a place name, for residents of that place (e.g., Utahn, from Utah, or Sioux Cityan, from Sioux City) — coined by George H. Scheetz, according to Paul Dickson in What Do You Call a Person From...? A Dictionary of Resident Names. The term first appeared in print in 1988 in Names' Names: A Descriptive and Prescriptive Onymicon by George H. Scheetz. See also taxonym.
The word demonym was derived from the Greek word meaning "populace" (δῆμος, demos) with the suffix for "name" (-onym).

Aptronym

aptonymcharactonym
Other, late 20th century examples, such as hypernym and characternym, are typically incorrectly formed neologisms for which there are more traditional words formed in -onym (hyperonym and charactonym).
* -onym

Auto-antonym

self-contradictionalso a word meaningcontronym
contronym or antagonym or autoantonym: a word that may have opposite meanings in different contexts, such as cleave meaning "stick together" or "split apart"
-onym

Ethnonym

ethnonymsethonymEth.
ethnonym: a name of an ethnic group. A type of taxonym.
-onym

Retronym

renamedretroactive additionretroactively
retronym: a compound or modified noun that replaces an original simple noun, for example "analog watch" now means what "watch" used to mean before the invention of the digital watch; and motorcycles became "solo motorcycles" when others were built with sidecars
The term retronym, a neologism composed of the combining forms retro- + -nym, was coined by Frank Mankiewicz in 1980 and popularized by William Safire in The New York Times Magazine.

Hyponymy and hypernymy

umbrella termblanket termhyponym
Other, late 20th century examples, such as hypernym and characternym, are typically incorrectly formed neologisms for which there are more traditional words formed in -onym (hyperonym and charactonym).
-onym

Metonymy

metonymmetonymicmetonymically
In the examples ananym and metanym, the correct forms (anonym and metonym) were pre-occupied by other meanings.
-onym

Paronym

paronym: a word that is related to another word and derives from the same root; a cognate word, such as dubious and doubtful
-onym

Synonym

syn.synonymssynonymous
synonym: 1: a word equivalent in meaning or nearly so to another word; a word that may be substituted for another word that has the same or a similar meaning, such as near and close (compare "antonym"). 2: In Biology, one or more names given to the same taxon, and so considered equivalent. Usually only one of them in considered as correct (senior synonym in animal taxonomy, accepted name in plant taxonomy), while the other are considered deprecated (see synonym (taxonomy).
-onym

Suffix

suffixesendingdesinence
The suffix -onym, in English and other languages, means "word, name", and words ending in -onym refer to a specified kind of name or word, most of which are classical compounds.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
The suffix -onym, in English and other languages, means "word, name", and words ending in -onym refer to a specified kind of name or word, most of which are classical compounds.

Word

wordsverballexical
The suffix -onym, in English and other languages, means "word, name", and words ending in -onym refer to a specified kind of name or word, most of which are classical compounds.

Classical compound

combining formscombining formneoclassical compound
The suffix -onym, in English and other languages, means "word, name", and words ending in -onym refer to a specified kind of name or word, most of which are classical compounds.

Radar

radar stationradarsradar system
For example, an acronym is a word formed from the initial letter or letters of each of the successive parts or major parts of a compound term (as radar).

Anonymity

anonymousanonymouslyincognito
In the examples ananym and metanym, the correct forms (anonym and metonym) were pre-occupied by other meanings.

Neologism

neologismscoinedneologistic
Other, late 20th century examples, such as hypernym and characternym, are typically incorrectly formed neologisms for which there are more traditional words formed in -onym (hyperonym and charactonym).

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The English suffix -onym is from the Ancient Greek suffix -ώνυμον (ōnymon), neuter of the suffix ώνυμος (ōnymos), having a specified kind of name, from the Greek ὄνομα (ónoma), Aeolic Greek ὄνυμα (ónyma), "name".

Aeolic Greek

AeolicAeolic dialectThessalian
The English suffix -onym is from the Ancient Greek suffix -ώνυμον (ōnymon), neuter of the suffix ώνυμος (ōnymos), having a specified kind of name, from the Greek ὄνομα (ónoma), Aeolic Greek ὄνυμα (ónyma), "name".