111 (emergency telephone number)

1111-1-11-1-1 emergency telephone number111 emergency111 emergency networkemergency number 111
111 (usually pronounced one-one-one) is the emergency telephone number in New Zealand.wikipedia
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Emergency telephone number

emergency callemergency numberemergency calls
111 (usually pronounced one-one-one) is the emergency telephone number in New Zealand.
An example of this was Auckland, New Zealand, before the introduction of 111 in the 1960s – the city had 40 exchanges, all with different emergency numbers, and finding the telephone number for the local exchange would require having to search through the city's 500-page telephone directory.

Masterton

Masterton District Council Masterton, New ZealandMasterton, Wellington
It was first implemented in Masterton and Carterton on 29 September 1958, and was progressively rolled out nationwide with the last exchanges converting in 1988.
Masterton and nearby Carterton were the first towns in New Zealand to introduce the emergency number 111, in September 1958.

Disappearance of Iraena Asher

Iraena Asher
A case that caused particular concern was the disappearance of Iraena Asher, who vanished in October 2004 after she rang the police in distress and was instead sent a taxi that went to the wrong address.
At 9 pm on 10 October, Asher called the New Zealand Police using the 1-1-1 emergency telephone number, from Piha, expressing fears for her safety.

999 (emergency telephone number)

9999-9-9999 call
Familiar with Britain’s 999 system, he campaigned for the setting up of a universal emergency telephone number across the country.
111 – emergency number in New Zealand

New Zealand Police

PoliceMinister of PoliceNew Zealand Police Force
In mid-1957, a committee was set up to institute a common emergency number across New Zealand, consisting of the Post and Telegraph Department, the Police, the Health Department, and the Fire Service.
In 2004 and 2005, the police were criticised over several incidents in which callers to the Police Communications Centres, particularly those using the 111 emergency telephone number, received inadequate responses.

New Zealand

🇳🇿NZLNZ
111 (usually pronounced one-one-one) is the emergency telephone number in New Zealand.

Carterton, New Zealand

CartertonCarterton DistrictCarterton District Council
It was first implemented in Masterton and Carterton on 29 September 1958, and was progressively rolled out nationwide with the last exchanges converting in 1988.

Telephone exchange

exchangescentral officeexchange
For the quarter of New Zealand’s then 414,000 telephone subscribers that were still on manual exchanges, one would simply pick up the telephone and ask the answering operator for the police, ambulance, or fire service by name.

Police

policingpolice forcepolice department
For the quarter of New Zealand’s then 414,000 telephone subscribers that were still on manual exchanges, one would simply pick up the telephone and ask the answering operator for the police, ambulance, or fire service by name.

Ambulance

ambulancesmedical carground
For the quarter of New Zealand’s then 414,000 telephone subscribers that were still on manual exchanges, one would simply pick up the telephone and ask the answering operator for the police, ambulance, or fire service by name.

Fire department

fire brigadefire servicefire
For the quarter of New Zealand’s then 414,000 telephone subscribers that were still on manual exchanges, one would simply pick up the telephone and ask the answering operator for the police, ambulance, or fire service by name.

Auckland

Auckland, New ZealandAuckland CityAuckland Central
Auckland, for example, had 40 telephone exchanges, and the telephone directory had 500 pages to search through to find the right number, although the separate emergency numbers for fire, police and ambulance in the main service area (e.g. Auckland, but not for not minor exchanges) were listed in bold on the first page.

Ballantyne's fire

Ballantyne's Department StoreBallantyne's Department Store fireBallantynes Fire
Following the 1947 Ballantynes fire in Christchurch, fire officer Arthur Varley was recruited from the UK to bring about a reform of the fire service.

Christchurch

Christchurch, New ZealandChristchurch CityChristchurch City Council
Following the 1947 Ballantynes fire in Christchurch, fire officer Arthur Varley was recruited from the UK to bring about a reform of the fire service.

New Zealand Post Office

Post and Telegraph DepartmentPost OfficeNew Zealand Post and Telegraph Department
In mid-1957, a committee was set up to institute a common emergency number across New Zealand, consisting of the Post and Telegraph Department, the Police, the Health Department, and the Fire Service.

New Zealand Fire Service

Fire Servicefire fightersFire Service Commission
In mid-1957, a committee was set up to institute a common emergency number across New Zealand, consisting of the Post and Telegraph Department, the Police, the Health Department, and the Fire Service.

Postmaster

postmistressChief PostmasterGeneral Superintendent of Posts
In early 1958, the Postmaster General approved the provision of the service using the number 111.

Pulse dialing

dial pulsepulse diallingpulse dial
With pulse dialling, New Zealand telephones pulse in reverse to the UK - dialling 0 sent ten pulses, 1 sent nine, 2 sent eight, 3 sent seven, etc. in New Zealand, while in the UK, dialling 1 sent one pulse, 2 sent two, etc. In the early years of 111, the telephone equipment was based on British Post Office equipment, except for this unusual orientation.

Telephone switchboard

switchboardswitchboardscentral switchboard
When a subscriber dialled 111 at either exchange, the call was routed by the automatic exchange onto one of three dedicated lines to the toll switchboard at the Masterton exchange (although the exchange connected calls automatically, long-distance (toll) calls still had to be connected manually through an operator).

Switchboard operator

telephone operatoroperatoroperators
When a subscriber dialled 111 at either exchange, the call was routed by the automatic exchange onto one of three dedicated lines to the toll switchboard at the Masterton exchange (although the exchange connected calls automatically, long-distance (toll) calls still had to be connected manually through an operator).

Sawmill

saw milllumber millmill
Among the first 111 calls was a call for an ambulance after an accident at a sawmill, and call to the fire service after a rubbish tip fire in Carterton.

Rotary system

RotaryRotary exchanges
After the introduction of 111 in Masterton and Carterton, the service soon expanded to most major towns and cities, including from 1961 the main centres like Wellington, where the multi-exchange area included some pre-war Rotary exchanges.

SIM card

SIMnano-SIMSIM cards
Mobile phones must have a valid SIM card installed.

Spark New Zealand

TelecomSparkTelecom New Zealand
The Spark operator will then answer: "111 emergency, do you require fire, ambulance or police?".

Advanced Mobile Location

AML
1) Advanced Mobile Location (both Google's Android Emergency Location Service, and since March 2018 Apple's AML for iOS ); and