A report on 15 and 290 theorems

In mathematics, the 15 theorem or Conway–Schneeberger Fifteen Theorem, proved by John H. Conway and W. A. Schneeberger in 1993, states that if a positive definite quadratic form with integer matrix represents all positive integers up to 15, then it represents all positive integers.

- 15 and 290 theorems

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Manjul Bhargava in 2014

Manjul Bhargava

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Canadian-American mathematician.

Canadian-American mathematician.

Manjul Bhargava in 2014
Manjul Bhargava in 2014
Four Fields medallists left to right (Artur Avila, Martin Hairer (at back), Maryam Mirzakhani, with Maryam's daughter Anahita) and Bhargava at the ICM 2014 in Seoul

Proof of the 15 theorem, including an extension of the theorem to other number sets such as the odd numbers and the prime numbers.

Quadratic form

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Quadratic forms occupy a central place in various branches of mathematics, including number theory, linear algebra, group theory (orthogonal group), differential geometry (Riemannian metric, second fundamental form), differential topology (intersection forms of four-manifolds), and Lie theory (the Killing form).

Quadratic forms occupy a central place in various branches of mathematics, including number theory, linear algebra, group theory (orthogonal group), differential geometry (Riemannian metric, second fundamental form), differential topology (intersection forms of four-manifolds), and Lie theory (the Killing form).

Recently, the 15 and 290 theorems have completely characterized universal integral quadratic forms: if all coefficients are integers, then it represents all positive integers if and only if it represents all integers up through 290; if it has an integral matrix, it represents all positive integers if and only if it represents all integers up through 15.