16-bit

16 bit16-1616-bit application16 bits16-bit architecture16 bit game16-bit applications16-bit computer16-bit CPUs
16-bit microcomputers are computers in which 16-bit microprocessors were the norm.wikipedia
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HP 2100

HP 1000HP 2000HP2000
undefined 1965–70) include the IBM 1130, the HP 2100, the Data General Nova, and the DEC PDP-11. undefined 1975–76) include the Panafacom MN1610 (1975), National Semiconductor PACE (1975), General Instrument CP1600 (1975), Texas Instruments TMS9900 (1976), and the HP BPC.
The HP 2100 is a series of 16-bit minicomputers that were produced by Hewlett-Packard (HP) from the mid-1960s to early 1990s.

PDP-11

LSI-11PDP-11/70DEC PDP-11
undefined 1965–70) include the IBM 1130, the HP 2100, the Data General Nova, and the DEC PDP-11.
The PDP-11 is a series of 16-bit minicomputers sold by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) from 1970 into the 1990s, one of a succession of products in the PDP series.

Data General Nova

NovaData General Nova 800Data General Nova 2
undefined 1965–70) include the IBM 1130, the HP 2100, the Data General Nova, and the DEC PDP-11.
The Data General Nova is a series of 16-bit minicomputers released by the American company Data General.

IBM 1130

11301130 computing systemVariations
undefined 1965–70) include the IBM 1130, the HP 2100, the Data General Nova, and the DEC PDP-11.
It has a 16-bit binary architecture, as do later minicomputers like the PDP-11 and Data General Nova.

Intel 8086

808680C86Intel-8086
Other notable 16-bit processors include the Intel 8086, the Intel 80286, the WDC 65C816, and the Zilog Z8000.
The 8086 (also called iAPX 86 ) is a 16-bit microprocessor chip designed by Intel between early 1976 and June 8, 1978, when it was released.

General Instrument CP1600

CP1600CP1610CP-1610
undefined 1975–76) include the Panafacom MN1610 (1975), National Semiconductor PACE (1975), General Instrument CP1600 (1975), Texas Instruments TMS9900 (1976), and the HP BPC.
The CP1600 is a 16-bit microprocessor created in a partnership between General Instrument and Honeywell in 1975.

Texas Instruments TMS9900

TMS9900TMS 9900Texas Instruments 16-bit CPU
undefined 1975–76) include the Panafacom MN1610 (1975), National Semiconductor PACE (1975), General Instrument CP1600 (1975), Texas Instruments TMS9900 (1976), and the HP BPC.
Introduced in June 1976, the TMS9900 was one of the first commercially available, single-chip 16-bit microprocessors.

Microprocessor

microprocessorsprocessorprocessors
16-bit microcomputers are computers in which 16-bit microprocessors were the norm.
An 8- or 16-bit processor may be selected over a 32-bit processor for system on a chip or microcontroller applications that require extremely low-power electronics, or are part of a mixed-signal integrated circuit with noise-sensitive on-chip analog electronics such as high-resolution analog to digital converters, or both.

Signedness

unsignedsignedunsigned integer
The signed range of integer values that can be stored in 16 bits is −32,768 (−1 × 2 15 ) through 32,767 (2 15 − 1); the unsigned range is 0 through 65,535 (2 16 − 1).
For example, a two's complement signed 16-bit integer can hold the values −32768 to 32767 inclusively, while an unsigned 16 bit integer can hold the values 0 to 65535.

IMP-16

National Semiconductor IMP-16National IMP-16
undefined 1973–76) include the five-chip National Semiconductor IMP-16 (1973), the two-chip NEC μCOM-16 (1974), the three-chip Western Digital MCP-1600 (1975), and the five-chip Toshiba T-3412 (1976).
The IMP-16, by National Semiconductor, was the first multi-chip 16-bit microprocessor in 1973.

Zilog Z8000

Z8000Zilog Z8001Zilog Z8002
Other notable 16-bit processors include the Intel 8086, the Intel 80286, the WDC 65C816, and the Zilog Z8000.
The Z8000 ("zee- or zed-eight-thousand") is a 16-bit microprocessor introduced by Zilog in early 1979.

Intel 8088

808880C888088 processor
The Intel 8088 was binary compatible with the Intel 8086, and was 16-bit in that its registers were 16 bits wide, and arithmetic instructions could operate on 16-bit quantities, even though its external bus was 8 bits wide.
Introduced on June 1, 1979, the 8088 had an eight-bit external data bus instead of the 16-bit bus of the 8086.

Motorola 68000

68000M68000MC68000
The Motorola 68000 is sometimes called 16-bit because its internal and external data buses were 16 bits wide; however, it could be considered a 32-bit processor in that the general purpose registers were 32 bits wide and most arithmetic instructions supported 32-bit arithmetic.
Internally, it uses a 16-bit data ALU and two additional 16-bit ALUs used mostly for addresses, and has a 16-bit external data bus.

National Semiconductor PACE

PACEINS8900National Semiconductor PACE CPU
undefined 1975–76) include the Panafacom MN1610 (1975), National Semiconductor PACE (1975), General Instrument CP1600 (1975), Texas Instruments TMS9900 (1976), and the HP BPC.
National Semiconductor's IPC-16A/520 PACE, short for "Processing and Control Element", was the first commercial single-chip 16-bit microprocessor.

Intel 80286

80286286Intel 286
Other notable 16-bit processors include the Intel 8086, the Intel 80286, the WDC 65C816, and the Zilog Z8000. Similar analysis applies to Intel's 80286 CPU replacement, called the 386SX, which is a 32-bit processor with 32-bit ALU and internal 32-bit data paths with a 16-bit external bus and 24-bit addressing of the processor it replaced.
The Intel 80286 (also marketed as the iAPX 286 and often called Intel 286) is a 16-bit microprocessor that was introduced on February 1, 1982.

PFU Limited

PanafacomFACOM 9450
undefined 1975–76) include the Panafacom MN1610 (1975), National Semiconductor PACE (1975), General Instrument CP1600 (1975), Texas Instruments TMS9900 (1976), and the HP BPC.
The company provided OEM manufacturing for Fujitsu and Matsushita, and developed one of the first commercially available 16-bit microprocessors, the MN1610.

24-bit

24 bits24 bit24 bits per pixel
Only 24 bits of the program counter (PC) were available on original DIP packages, with up to 16 megabytes of addressable RAM.
The early 1980s saw the first popular personal computers, including the IBM PC/AT with an Intel 80286 processor using 24-bit addressing and 16-bit general registers and arithmetic, and the Apple Macintosh 128K with a Motorola 68000 processor featuring 24-bit addressing and 32-bit registers.

1801 series CPU

K1801VM110131013, 1801, 1806, and 1836 series of CPUs
The 1801 series CPUs were a family of 16-bit Soviet microprocessors based on the indigenous Elektronika NC microarchitecture cores, but binary compatible with DEC's PDP-11 machines.

Data General

Data General Corporation Data General CorporationDG.com
Their first product, the Data General Nova, was a 16-bit minicomputer.

Intel 80386

80386i386386
Similar analysis applies to Intel's 80286 CPU replacement, called the 386SX, which is a 32-bit processor with 32-bit ALU and internal 32-bit data paths with a 16-bit external bus and 24-bit addressing of the processor it replaced.
The predecessor of the 80386 was the Intel 80286, a 16-bit processor with a segment-based memory management and protection system.

ESi-RISC

eSi-1600eSi-3200
The eSi-1600 and eSi-1650 feature a 16-bit data-path, while the eSi-32x0s feature 32-bit data-paths, and the eSi-3264 features a mixed 32/64-bit datapath.

Data General Eclipse

EclipseData General Eclipse MVData General Eclipse S/200
The Data General Eclipse line of computers by Data General were 16-bit minicomputers released in early 1974 and sold until 1988.

32-bit

32-32 bit32
The Motorola 68000 is sometimes called 16-bit because its internal and external data buses were 16 bits wide; however, it could be considered a 32-bit processor in that the general purpose registers were 32 bits wide and most arithmetic instructions supported 32-bit arithmetic.
In this context, the term came about because DOS, Microsoft Windows and OS/2 were originally written for the 8088/8086 or 80286, 16-bit microprocessors with a segmented address space where programs had to switch between segments to reach more than 64 kilobytes of code or data.

Honeywell Level 6

DPS 6/DPS 6000Honeywell DPS6
The Honeywell Level 6 was a line of 16-bit minicomputers, later upgraded to 32-bit, manufactured by Honeywell, Inc. from the mid 1970s.

IBM Series/1

Series/1EDLEvent Driven Language
The IBM Series/1 is a 16-bit minicomputer, introduced in 1976, that in many respects competed with other minicomputers of the time, such as the PDP-11 from Digital Equipment Corporation and similar offerings from Data General and HP.