1630 in literature

1630
This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1630.wikipedia
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The Soddered Citizen

John Clavell – The Soddered Citizen
The Soddered Citizen was produced onstage, most likely in 1630, by the King's Men at the Blackfriars Theatre.

The Picture (Massinger play)

The PictureThe Picture'' (Massinger play)
Philip Massinger – The Picture and The Renegado (published)
The Picture is a Caroline era stage play, a tragicomedy written by Philip Massinger, and first published in 1630.

The Renegado

Philip Massinger – The Picture and The Renegado (published)
The Renegado, or The Gentleman of Venice is a late Jacobean stage play, a tragicomedy written by Philip Massinger and first published in 1630.

A Chaste Maid in Cheapside

Thomas Middleton – A Chaste Maid in Cheapside (published)
Unpublished until 1630 and long-neglected afterwards, it is now considered among the best and most characteristic Jacobean comedies.

John Clavell

Clavell
John Clavell – The Soddered Citizen
It was acted by the King's Men at the Blackfriars Theatre in 1630.

1721 in literature

1721
February 8 – Pierre Daniel Huet, French scholar and bishop (died 1721)
January 26 – Pierre Daniel Huet, French scholar and bishop (born 1630)

1693 in literature

1693
October 31 (baptised) – John Spencer, English scholar and cleric (died 1693)
May 27 – John Spencer, English scholar and cleric (born 1630)

1718 in literature

1718
November 24 – Étienne Baluze, French scholar (died 1718)
July 28 – Étienne Baluze, French scholar (born 1630)

1552 in literature

1552
April 29 – Agrippa d'Aubigné, French Protestant poet and dramatist (born 1552)
February 8 – Agrippa d'Aubigné, French Protestant poet (died 1630)

1677 in literature

1677
October – Isaac Barrow, English theologian and mathematician (died 1677)
December 24 – Jacques de Coras, French poet (born 1630)

1597 in literature

1597
July 3 – Sigismondo Boldoni, Italian writer, poet, and physician (born 1597)
July 5 – Sigismondo Boldoni, Italian writer, poet, and physician (died 1630)

1581 in literature

1581
November 5 – Charles Malapert, Jesuit writer from Spanish Netherlands (born 1581)
Charles Malapert, Belgian Jesuit writer (died 1630)

April 10

10 April10
April 10 – English literature, drama, and education lose a major patron and benefactor when William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke and Lord Chamberlain of England, dies at Baynard's Castle in London.

William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke

William HerbertEarl of PembrokePembroke
April 10 – English literature, drama, and education lose a major patron and benefactor when William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke and Lord Chamberlain of England, dies at Baynard's Castle in London.

Lord Chamberlain

Lord Chamberlain of the HouseholdKing's Chamberlainchamberlain
April 10 – English literature, drama, and education lose a major patron and benefactor when William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke and Lord Chamberlain of England, dies at Baynard's Castle in London.

Baynard's Castle

Baynard CastleBeynardes CastellCastle Baynard
April 10 – English literature, drama, and education lose a major patron and benefactor when William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke and Lord Chamberlain of England, dies at Baynard's Castle in London.

Presbyterianism

PresbyterianPresbyteriansPresbyterian Church
June – Scottish-born Presbyterian Alexander Leighton is brought before Archbishop William Laud's Star Chamber court in England for publishing the seditious pamphlet An Appeale to the Parliament, or, Sions Plea Against the Prelacy (printed in the Netherlands, 1628). He is sentenced to be pilloried and whipped, have his ears cropped, one side of his nose slit, and his face branded with "SS" (for "sower of sedition"), to be imprisoned, and be degraded from holy orders.

Alexander Leighton

June – Scottish-born Presbyterian Alexander Leighton is brought before Archbishop William Laud's Star Chamber court in England for publishing the seditious pamphlet An Appeale to the Parliament, or, Sions Plea Against the Prelacy (printed in the Netherlands, 1628). He is sentenced to be pilloried and whipped, have his ears cropped, one side of his nose slit, and his face branded with "SS" (for "sower of sedition"), to be imprisoned, and be degraded from holy orders.

Archbishop

archiepiscopalarchbishopsTitular Archbishop
June – Scottish-born Presbyterian Alexander Leighton is brought before Archbishop William Laud's Star Chamber court in England for publishing the seditious pamphlet An Appeale to the Parliament, or, Sions Plea Against the Prelacy (printed in the Netherlands, 1628). He is sentenced to be pilloried and whipped, have his ears cropped, one side of his nose slit, and his face branded with "SS" (for "sower of sedition"), to be imprisoned, and be degraded from holy orders.

William Laud

Archbishop LaudLaudArchbishop William Laud
June – Scottish-born Presbyterian Alexander Leighton is brought before Archbishop William Laud's Star Chamber court in England for publishing the seditious pamphlet An Appeale to the Parliament, or, Sions Plea Against the Prelacy (printed in the Netherlands, 1628). He is sentenced to be pilloried and whipped, have his ears cropped, one side of his nose slit, and his face branded with "SS" (for "sower of sedition"), to be imprisoned, and be degraded from holy orders.

Star Chamber

Court of the Star Chambersecret courtCourt of Star Chamber
June – Scottish-born Presbyterian Alexander Leighton is brought before Archbishop William Laud's Star Chamber court in England for publishing the seditious pamphlet An Appeale to the Parliament, or, Sions Plea Against the Prelacy (printed in the Netherlands, 1628). He is sentenced to be pilloried and whipped, have his ears cropped, one side of his nose slit, and his face branded with "SS" (for "sower of sedition"), to be imprisoned, and be degraded from holy orders.

Sedition

seditiousanti-governmentseditious conspiracy
June – Scottish-born Presbyterian Alexander Leighton is brought before Archbishop William Laud's Star Chamber court in England for publishing the seditious pamphlet An Appeale to the Parliament, or, Sions Plea Against the Prelacy (printed in the Netherlands, 1628). He is sentenced to be pilloried and whipped, have his ears cropped, one side of his nose slit, and his face branded with "SS" (for "sower of sedition"), to be imprisoned, and be degraded from holy orders.

Thomas Dekker (writer)

Thomas DekkerDekkerDekker, Thomas (1572–1632)
Thomas Dekker – London Look Back

Thomas Randolph (poet)

Thomas RandolphRandolphThomas Randoph
Thomas Randolph – Aristippus, or The Jovial Philosopher and The Conceited Pedlar (in one volume)