1816 United States presidential election

18161816 presidential electionElection of 1816U.S. presidential election161816 election1817cast their votesPresident 1816presidential election
The 1816 United States presidential election was the eighth quadrennial presidential election.wikipedia
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James Monroe

MonroePresident MonroePresident James Monroe
In the first election following the end of the War of 1812, Democratic-Republican candidate James Monroe defeated Federalist Rufus King.
His war-time leadership established him as Madison's heir apparent, and he easily defeated Federalist Party candidate Rufus King in the 1816 presidential election.

Rufus King

KingKing, RufusRufus King of New York
In the first election following the end of the War of 1812, Democratic-Republican candidate James Monroe defeated Federalist Rufus King.
He emerged as a leading member of the Federalist Party, serving as the party's last presidential nominee in the 1816 presidential election.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
The 1816 United States presidential election was the eighth quadrennial presidential election.

Daniel D. Tompkins

Daniel TompkinsDaniel D TompkinsDaniel Tomkins
Governor Daniel D. Tompkins of New York won the Democratic-Republican vice presidential nomination, continuing the party's tradition of balancing a presidential nominee from Virginia with a vice presidential nominee from either New York or New England. Also, there was widespread sentiment, especially in New York, that it was time to end the Virginia dynasty of presidents, resulting in Daniel D. Tompkins and Simon Snyder, the governors of New York and Pennsylvania respectively, briefly considering running for the nomination.
Tompkins was the Democratic-Republican Party's vice presidential nominee in the 1816 presidential election.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
In the first election following the end of the War of 1812, Democratic-Republican candidate James Monroe defeated Federalist Rufus King.
The Federalists offered little opposition in the 1816 presidential election and Monroe won in a landslide election.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
In the first election following the end of the War of 1812, Democratic-Republican candidate James Monroe defeated Federalist Rufus King.
The Federalists fielded their last presidential candidate (Rufus King) in 1816.

John Eager Howard

John E. HowardJohn HowardGeneral John Eager Howard
Several Federalists would receive electoral votes for vice president, with former Senator John Eager Howard of Maryland receiving the most votes.
In the 1816 presidential election, Howard received 22 electoral votes for vice president on the Federalist Party ticket with Rufus King.

William H. Crawford

William CrawfordWilliam Harris CrawfordCrawford Republican
With the support of Madison and former President Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State Monroe defeated Secretary of War William H. Crawford to win his party's presidential nomination.
After slightly more than a year of service in that post and after narrowly failing to win the Democratic-Republican nomination for the 1816 presidential race, President Madison appointed him Treasury Secretary.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
As President James Madison chose to retire after serving two terms, the Democratic-Republicans held a congressional nominating caucus in March 1816.
In the 1816 presidential election, Madison and Jefferson both favored the candidacy of Secretary of State James Monroe.

Simon Snyder

Pennsylvania Governor Simon SnyderSnyder
Also, there was widespread sentiment, especially in New York, that it was time to end the Virginia dynasty of presidents, resulting in Daniel D. Tompkins and Simon Snyder, the governors of New York and Pennsylvania respectively, briefly considering running for the nomination.
He strongly supported the War of 1812 and was a candidate for the Democratic-Republican vice presidential nomination in the 1816 presidential election.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
Monroe won the Electoral College by the wide margin, carrying 16 of the 19 states.

1816 and 1817 United States Senate elections

181618171816 (Special)
The United States Senate elections of 1816 and 1817 were elections for the United States Senate that had the Democratic-Republican Party gain a net of two seats from the admission of a new state, and which coincided with the presidential election.

Robert Goodloe Harper

Robert G. HarperRobert HarperGoodloe Harper
Delaware chose a different Marylander, sitting United States Senator Robert Goodloe Harper.
He was an unsuccessful Federalist candidate for Vice President in the 1816 election.

War of 1812

The War of 1812American War of 1812war
In the first election following the end of the War of 1812, Democratic-Republican candidate James Monroe defeated Federalist Rufus King.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
With the support of Madison and former President Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State Monroe defeated Secretary of War William H. Crawford to win his party's presidential nomination. As President James Madison chose to retire after serving two terms, the Democratic-Republicans held a congressional nominating caucus in March 1816.

Congressional nominating caucus

caucusesCongressional caucusnominating caucus
As President James Madison chose to retire after serving two terms, the Democratic-Republicans held a congressional nominating caucus in March 1816.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
With the support of Madison and former President Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State Monroe defeated Secretary of War William H. Crawford to win his party's presidential nomination.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
Governor Daniel D. Tompkins of New York won the Democratic-Republican vice presidential nomination, continuing the party's tradition of balancing a presidential nominee from Virginia with a vice presidential nominee from either New York or New England. The Federalists found themselves discredited by their opposition to the war, as well as the secessionist rhetoric from New England embodied by the Hartford Convention.

Treaty of Ghent

peace treatytreatyGhent peace conference
While the war had not ended in victory, the peace concluded in 1815 was satisfactory to the American people, and the Democratic-Republicans received the credit for its conclusion.

Hartford Convention

discreditedconventionsecession
The Federalists found themselves discredited by their opposition to the war, as well as the secessionist rhetoric from New England embodied by the Hartford Convention.

Second Bank of the United States

Bank of the United Statesnational bankUnited States Bank
Furthermore, President Madison had succeeded in realizing certain measures favored by the Federalists, including a national bank and protective tariffs.

Tariff in United States history

tariffstariffTariffs in United States history
Furthermore, President Madison had succeeded in realizing certain measures favored by the Federalists, including a national bank and protective tariffs.