1824 United States presidential election

18241824 presidential election1824 electionpresidential election of 1824election of 1824election later that year1824 U.S. presidential electionIn 1824Contingent election of 1825U.S. presidential election, 1824
The 1824 United States presidential election was the tenth quadrennial presidential election, held from Tuesday, October 26 to Thursday, December 2, 1824.wikipedia
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United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
The 1824 United States presidential election was the tenth quadrennial presidential election, held from Tuesday, October 26 to Thursday, December 2, 1824.
In the presidential election of 1824, Andrew Jackson received a plurality, but not a majority, of electoral votes cast.

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
On February 9, 1825, the House chose John Quincy Adams as president.
The 1824 presidential election was contested by Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, all of whom were members of the Democratic-Republican Party.

United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote

losing the nationwide popular votewin an outright majority of the popular voteand won the popular vote by two percent
It was the first election in which the winner did not achieve at least a plurality of the national popular vote.
There have been five United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote including the 1824 election, which was the first U.S. presidential election where the popular vote was recorded.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
The Democratic-Republican Party had won six consecutive presidential elections and was the only national political party.
The Democratic-Republicans became increasingly dominant after the 1800 elections as the opposing Federalist Party collapsed, and the party splintered during the 1824 presidential election.

Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
Senator Andrew Jackson, House Speaker Henry Clay, and Secretary of State Adams all joined Crawford in seeking the presidency, highlighting factionalism within the party and an end to the Era of Good Feelings.
He ran for president in 1824, winning a plurality of the popular and electoral vote.

Henry Clay

ClayHenry Clay, Sr.Clay, Henry
Senator Andrew Jackson, House Speaker Henry Clay, and Secretary of State Adams all joined Crawford in seeking the presidency, highlighting factionalism within the party and an end to the Era of Good Feelings.
He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections and helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.

William H. Crawford

William CrawfordWilliam Harris CrawfordCrawford Republican
The Congressional caucus nominated Treasury Secretary William H. Crawford for president.
He served as United States Secretary of War and United States Secretary of the Treasury before running for president in the 1824 election.

Contingent election

electno candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the electiontie-breaker by the United States House of Representatives
No candidate won a majority of the electoral vote, becoming the only election to require a contingent election in the House of Representatives under the provisions of the 12th Amendment.
In 1824, the presence of four candidates split the Electoral College, and Andrew Jackson lost the contingent election to John Quincy Adams despite winning a plurality of both the popular and electoral vote.

Era of Good Feelings

Era of Good Feelingreestablishment of normal diplomatic relationsThe Era of Good Feelings
Senator Andrew Jackson, House Speaker Henry Clay, and Secretary of State Adams all joined Crawford in seeking the presidency, highlighting factionalism within the party and an end to the Era of Good Feelings.
During and after the 1824 presidential election, the Democratic-Republican Party split between supporters and opponents of Jacksonian Nationalism, leading to the Second Party System.

John C. Calhoun

John CalhounJohn Caldwell CalhounCalhoun
A fifth candidate, John C. Calhoun, withdrew, instead choosing to run for vice president.
Calhoun was a candidate for the presidency in the 1824 election.

Albert Gallatin

GallatinistAbraham Alfonse Albert GallatinGallatin
The Congressional caucus nominated Crawford for president and Albert Gallatin for vice president, but it was sparsely attended and was widely attacked as undemocratic.
In the election of 1824, Gallatin was nominated for Vice President by the Democratic-Republican Congressional caucus.

Nathaniel Macon

MaconMacon, Nathaniel
He was replaced by North Carolina Senator Nathaniel Macon.
In the 1824 presidential election, he received several electoral votes for vice president, despite declining to run, as the stand-in running-mate for William Harris Crawford.

Mid-Atlantic (United States)

Mid-AtlanticMid-Atlantic statesMid-Atlantic region
Adams won New England, Jackson and Adams split the mid-Atlantic states, Jackson and Clay split the Western states, and Jackson and Crawford split the Southern states.

1824 United States presidential election in Alabama

1824AlabamaUnited States presidential election in Alabama, 1824
The 1824 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
On February 9, 1825, the House chose John Quincy Adams as president.
A quarter-century later, the choice for president again devolved to the House when no candidate won an absolute majority of electoral votes (131 of 261) in the election of 1824.

1824 United States presidential election in Connecticut

1824Connecticut
The 1824 United States presidential election in Connecticut took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Twelfth Amendment12th Amendment12th Amendment to the US Constitution
No candidate won a majority of the electoral vote, becoming the only election to require a contingent election in the House of Representatives under the provisions of the 12th Amendment.
It was necessary to do so when no candidate won an absolute majority (131 at the time) of electoral votes in the 1824 election: Andrew Jackson received 99 electoral votes, John Quincy Adams (son of John Adams) 84, William H. Crawford 41, and Henry Clay 37.

1824 United States presidential election in Delaware

1824Delaware
The 1824 United States presidential election in Delaware took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

1824 United States presidential election in Illinois

1824Illinois
The 1824 United States presidential election in Illinois took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

1824 United States presidential election in Georgia

1824Georgia
The 1824 United States presidential election in Georgia took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

1824 United States presidential election in Indiana

1824Indiana
The 1824 United States presidential election in Indiana took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

1824 United States presidential election in Kentucky

1824Kentucky
The 1824 United States presidential election in Kentucky took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

1824 United States presidential election in Louisiana

1824Louisiana
The 1824 United States presidential election in Louisiana took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

1824 United States presidential election in Maine

18242008 presidential electionMaine
The 1824 United States presidential election in Maine took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.

1824 United States presidential election in Maryland

1824Maryland
The 1824 United States presidential election in Maryland took place between October 26 and December 2, 1824, as part of the 1824 United States presidential election.