1832 United States presidential election

18321832 presidential election1832 electionpresidential election of 18321832 presidential candidateU.S. presidential election, 18321832 election for President1832 re-election1832 U.S. Presidential ElectionElection
The 1832 United States presidential election was the 12th quadrennial presidential election, held from Friday, November 2, to Wednesday, December 5, 1832.wikipedia
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Henry Clay

ClayHenry Clay, Sr.Clay, Henry
It saw incumbent President Andrew Jackson, candidate of the Democratic Party, defeat Henry Clay, candidate of the National Republican Party.
He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections and helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.

Martin Van Buren

Van BurenPresident Martin Van BurenPresident Van Buren
Jackson won re-nomination with no opposition, and the 1832 Democratic National Convention replaced Vice President John C. Calhoun with Martin Van Buren.
At Jackson's behest, the 1832 Democratic National Convention nominated Van Buren for Vice President of the United States, and he took office after the Democratic ticket won the 1832 presidential election.

Anti-Masonic Party

Anti-MasonicAnti-MasonAnti-Masons
The election saw the first use of the presidential nominating conventions, and the Democrats, National Republicans, and the Anti-Masonic Party all used national conventions to select their respective presidential candidates.
The convention chose former attorney general William Wirt as the party's standard bearer in the 1832 presidential election and Wirt won 7.8% of the popular vote and carried Vermont.

William Wirt (Attorney General)

William WirtAttorney General WirtWirt
The Anti-Masonic Party, one of the first major third parties in U.S. history, nominated former Attorney General William Wirt.
He was also the Anti-Masonic nominee for president in the 1832 election.

Bank War

conflict over the National Bankdestroy the institution by 1833dismantling
Jackson faced heavy criticism for his actions in the Bank War, but he remained popular among the general public.
The B.U.S. became the central issue that divided the Jacksonians from the National Republicans in the presidential election of 1832.

United States presidential nominating convention

U.S. presidential nomination conventionpresidential nominating conventionpresidential nominating conventions
The election saw the first use of the presidential nominating conventions, and the Democrats, National Republicans, and the Anti-Masonic Party all used national conventions to select their respective presidential candidates.
In 1831 the Anti-Masonic Party convened in Baltimore, Maryland to select a single presidential candidate agreeable to the whole party leadership in the 1832 presidential election.

John Floyd (Virginia politician)

John FloydFloydFloyd, John
Virginia Governor John Floyd, who had not actively campaigned, received the electoral votes of South Carolina.
In 1832, Floyd received votes for the Presidency of the United States, running in the Nullifier Party.

National Republican Party

Anti-JacksonianNational RepublicanNational Republicans
It saw incumbent President Andrew Jackson, candidate of the Democratic Party, defeat Henry Clay, candidate of the National Republican Party.
Henry Clay served as the party's nominee in the 1832 election, but he was defeated by Jackson.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
Jackson won a majority of the popular vote and 219 of the 286 electoral votes cast, carrying most states outside of New England.
By 1832, only South Carolina had not transitioned to popular election.

1832 Democratic National Convention

1832BaltimoreDemocrats
Jackson won re-nomination with no opposition, and the 1832 Democratic National Convention replaced Vice President John C. Calhoun with Martin Van Buren.
The Democratic ticket of Jackson and Van Buren went on to win the 1832 presidential election.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
The 1832 United States presidential election was the 12th quadrennial presidential election, held from Friday, November 2, to Wednesday, December 5, 1832.

Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
It saw incumbent President Andrew Jackson, candidate of the Democratic Party, defeat Henry Clay, candidate of the National Republican Party.
The 1832 presidential election demonstrated the rapid development and organization of political parties during this time period.

Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
After the election, members of the National Republican Party and the Anti-Masonic Party formed the Whig Party, which became the primary opponent to the Democrats over the next two decades.
Jackson won another decisive victory in the 1832 presidential election, taking 55 percent of the national popular vote and 88 percent of the popular vote in the slave states south of Kentucky and Maryland.

John Sergeant (politician)

John SergeantSergeant, John
Former Congressman John Sergeant of Pennsylvania was nominated with 64 votes to six abstentions.
He was the National Republican Party's vice presidential nominee in the 1832 presidential election, serving on a ticket with Senator Henry Clay.

Second Bank of the United States

Bank of the United Statesnational bankUnited States Bank
Sergeant, a prominent Philadelphia attorney with connections to the Second Bank of the United States and a reputation as an opponent of slavery, provided the ticket with geographical balance.
The efforts to renew the bank's charter put the institution at the center of the general election of 1832, in which the bank's president Nicholas Biddle and pro-bank National Republicans led by Henry Clay clashed with the "hard-money" Andrew Jackson administration and eastern banking interests in the Bank War.

John C. Calhoun

John CalhounJohn Caldwell CalhounCalhoun
Jackson won re-nomination with no opposition, and the 1832 Democratic National Convention replaced Vice President John C. Calhoun with Martin Van Buren. While the South Carolina state legislature remained nominally under Democratic control, it refused to support Jackson's re-election due to the then-ongoing Nullification Crisis, and instead opted to back a ticket proposed by the Nullifier Party led by John C. Calhoun.
Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton, a staunch supporter of Jackson, then stated that Calhoun had "elected a Vice President", as Van Buren was able to move past his failed nomination as Minister to Great Britain and instead gain the Democratic Party's vice presidential nomination in the 1832 election, in which he and Jackson were victorious.

Amos Ellmaker

Ellmaker, Amos
Amos Ellmaker was nominated for vice-president with 108 votes to one for John C. Spencer (chairman of the convention) and two abstentions.
He served as the Pennsylvania Attorney General and was the Anti-Masonic vice presidential candidate in the 1832 presidential election.

Third party (United States)

third partythird-partythird parties
The Anti-Masonic Party, one of the first major third parties in U.S. history, nominated former Attorney General William Wirt.
Sometimes, they have won votes in the electoral college, as in the 1832 Presidential election.

Philip Pendleton Barbour

Philip P. BarbourPhilip BarbourBarbour
Martin Van Buren was nominated for vice-president on the first ballot, receiving 208 votes to 49 for Philip Pendleton Barbour and 26 for Richard Mentor Johnson.
In 1832, Democrats unhappy with the selection of Martin Van Buren as their party's vice-presidential nominee held a convention in Virginia, at which they nominated Jackson for president and Barbour for vice president.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
It saw incumbent President Andrew Jackson, candidate of the Democratic Party, defeat Henry Clay, candidate of the National Republican Party.

Nullifier Party

NullifierNNullfier
While the South Carolina state legislature remained nominally under Democratic control, it refused to support Jackson's re-election due to the then-ongoing Nullification Crisis, and instead opted to back a ticket proposed by the Nullifier Party led by John C. Calhoun.
The party supported Calhoun's ally John Floyd of Virginia for President in the 1832 election and the state legislature gave Floyd South Carolina's 11 electoral votes, even though Floyd was not a candidate and had himself unsuccessfully tried to convince Calhoun to run for President.

John Eaton (politician)

John EatonJohn H. EatonJohn Henry Eaton
As a result of this, Secretary of State Martin Van Buren and Secretary of War John H. Eaton resigned from office in April 1831, and Jackson requested the resignation of all other cabinet offices as well except one.
Van Buren was nominated for vice president, and was elected as Jackson's running mate when Jackson won a second term in 1832.

1832 United States presidential election in Connecticut

Connecticut1832
The 1832 United States presidential election in Connecticut took place between November 2 and December 5, 1832, as part of the 1832 United States presidential election.

1832 United States presidential election in Alabama

1832AlabamaUnited States presidential election in Alabama, 1832
The 1832 United States presidential election in Alabama took place between November 2 and December 5, 1832, as part of the 1832 United States presidential election.

1864 United States presidential election

18641864 presidential election1864 election
Furthermore, no president succeeded in securing re-election again until Abraham Lincoln in 1864.
Lincoln's victory made him the first president to win re-election since Andrew Jackson in 1832, as well as the first Northern president to ever win re-election.