Van Buren by Mathew Brady, c. 1855–1858
John Quincy Adams, the 6th president, became a Whig congressman later in his career.
Taylor in the mid-1840s
Van Buren's birthplace by John Warner Barber
Cass circa 1855
Henry Clay, a founder of the Whig Party in the 1830s and its 1844 presidential nominee
Taylor's childhood home in Louisville, Kentucky
Baptism record indicating the Dutch spelling of Van Buren's first name, "Maarten"
Lewis Cass Legacy Society logo
Daniel Webster, a leading Whig from New England
Grand National Whig banner
Taylor by Joseph Henry Bush,
Hannah Van Buren
William Henry Harrison, a two-time presidential candidate who became the first Whig president in 1841 but died just one month into office
Cass/Butler campaign poster
General Zachary Taylor rides his horse at the Battle of Palo Alto, May 8, 1846
Painting of Van Buren by Daniel Dickinson, c. 1820s
William Henry Harrison defeated Martin Van Buren in the 1840 presidential election, thereby becoming the first Whig president
Van Buren/Adams
U.S. Steam Ship Monmouth returns U.S. General Zachary Taylor from victories in the war with Mexico at Balize, Louisiana, November 1847
Mrs Floride Calhoun, a leader of the "petticoats"
President John Tyler clashed with congressional Whigs and was expelled from the party.
Map of presidential election results by county
Taylor/Fillmore 1848 campaign poster
A painting of Van Buren by Francis Alexander, c. undefined 1830
Zachary Taylor served in the Mexican-American War and later won the 1848 presidential election as the Whig nominee.
"Cock of the walk" - Zachary Taylor as victor
1848 electoral vote results
1836 electoral vote results
The United States settled the Texas-Mexico border and acquired portions of seven current states in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Portions of present-day Arizona and New Mexico were later acquired in the 1853 Gadsden Purchase.
Daguerreotype of Taylor by Matthew Brady, 1849
Painting of Van Buren by Henry Inman, c. 1837–38
A political cartoon satirizing the candidacy of either Zachary Taylor or Winfield Scott in the 1848 presidential election
Map of Whig presidential election results by county
United States states (Texas border unsettled, California admitted in 1850) and territories during Taylor's presidency
The modern balaam and his ass, an 1837 caricature placing the blame for the Panic of 1837 and the perilous state of the banking system on outgoing President Andrew Jackson, shown riding a donkey, while President Martin Van Buren comments approvingly
Millard Fillmore, the last Whig president
Map of Democratic presidential election results by county
President Zachary Taylor standing in front of his Cabinet, seated from left:
Reverdy Johnson, Attorney General; William M. Meredith, Secretary of the Treasury; William B. Preston, Secretary of the Navy; George W. Crawford, Secretary of War; Jacob Collamer, Postmaster General; Thomas Ewing, Secretary of the Interior; and John M. Clayton, Secretary of State. Lithograph by Francis D'Avignon, published by Mathew Brady, 1849.
A United States Marine Corps boat expedition searching the Everglades during the Second Seminole War
Gen. Winfield Scott, the unsuccessful Whig candidate in the 1852 presidential election
Map of Free Soil presidential election results by county
An 1850 print depicting the death of Zachary Taylor
"Destruction of the Caroline", illustration by John Charles Dent (1881)
Whig journalist Horace Greeley
Map of Liberty presidential election results by county
Taylor's mausoleum at the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky
1840 electoral vote results
John J. Crittenden, an influential Whig leader who later established the short-lived Constitutional Union Party to contest the election of 1860
Map of "Other" presidential election results by county
B.E.P. engraved portrait
Daguerreotype of Van Buren by Mathew Brady, c. 1849–50
U.S. presidential election results from 1828 to 1852. Darker shades of blue indicate states that generally voted for the Democratic Party, while darker shades of yellow/brown indicate states that generally voted for the Whig or National Republican Party.
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Margaret Smith Taylor
Daguerreotype of Martin Van Buren, circa 1855
Charles Sumner, an anti-slavery "Conscience Whig" who later joined the Republican Party
Cartogram of Whig presidential election results by county
Sarah [Knox] Taylor
1858 portrait by GPA Healy, on display at the White House
Edward Everett, a pro-South "Cotton Whig"
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Richard Taylor
Gubernatorial portrait of Martin Van Buren by Daniel Huntington in The Civil War
Abraham Lincoln, a former Whig congressman, won the 1860 presidential election on the Republican ticket.
Cartogram of Free Soil presidential election results by county
John Marshall Harlan, who began his career as a Whig officeholder, served on the Supreme Court from 1877 to 1911.
Cartogram of Liberty presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "Other" presidential election results by county

In the aftermath of the Mexican–American War, General Zachary Taylor of the Whig Party defeated Senator Lewis Cass of the Democratic Party.

- 1848 United States presidential election

Later in his life, Van Buren emerged as an elder statesman and an important anti-slavery leader who led the Free Soil Party ticket in the 1848 presidential election.

- Martin Van Buren

He was also the 1848 Democratic presidential nominee.

- Lewis Cass

The 1848 Democratic National Convention rejected former President Martin Van Buren's bid for a second term, instead nominating Senator Lewis Cass of Michigan.

- 1848 United States presidential election

In the 1836 presidential election, four different regional Whig candidates received electoral votes, but the party failed to defeat Jackson's chosen successor, Martin Van Buren.

- Whig Party (United States)

Whig nominee Zachary Taylor won the 1848 presidential election, but Taylor died in 1850 and was succeeded by Millard Fillmore.

- Whig Party (United States)

After serving as ambassador to France from 1836 to 1842, he unsuccessfully sought the presidential nomination at the 1844 Democratic National Convention; a deadlock between supporters of Cass and former President Martin Van Buren ended with the nomination of James K. Polk.

- Lewis Cass

Van Buren led the Free Soil Party's presidential ticket and appealed to many anti-slavery Democrats, possibly contributing to the victory of Whig nominee Zachary Taylor.

- Lewis Cass

The Whig Party convinced a reluctant Taylor to lead their ticket in the 1848 presidential election, despite his unclear political tenets and lack of interest in politics.

- Zachary Taylor

In 1840, Van Buren lost his re-election bid to William Henry Harrison, the nominee of the anti-Jacksonian Whig Party.

- Martin Van Buren

He won the general election alongside New York politician Millard Fillmore, defeating Democratic Party candidates Lewis Cass and William Orlando Butler, as well as a third-party effort led by former president Martin Van Buren and Charles Francis Adams, Sr. of the Free Soil Party.

- Zachary Taylor

Van Buren was the newly formed Free Soil Party's presidential nominee in 1848, and his candidacy helped Whig nominee Zachary Taylor defeat Democrat Lewis Cass.

- Martin Van Buren

During the campaign, Northern Whig leaders touted traditional Whig policies like support for infrastructure spending and increased tariff rates, but Southern Whigs largely eschewed economic policy, instead emphasizing that Taylor's status as a slaveholder meant that he could be trusted on the issue of slavery more so than Democratic candidate Lewis Cass of Michigan.

- Whig Party (United States)
Van Buren by Mathew Brady, c. 1855–1858

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Martin Van Buren/Charles Francis Adams campaign banner

Free Soil Party

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Short-lived coalition political party in the United States active from 1848 to 1854, when it merged into the Republican Party.

Short-lived coalition political party in the United States active from 1848 to 1854, when it merged into the Republican Party.

Martin Van Buren/Charles Francis Adams campaign banner
James G. Birney was the two-time presidential nominee of the Liberty Party, a forerunner of the Free Soil Party.
Free Soilers sought to exclude slavery from the Mexican Cession (red), which was acquired from Mexico in the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
The party nominated former President Martin Van Buren for president in the 1848 presidential election
1848 cartoon for Van Buren
Salmon P. Chase of Ohio was one of the most prominent leaders of the Free Soil Party
In this 1850 political cartoon, the artist attacks abolitionist, Free Soil and other sectionalist interests of 1850 as dangers to the Union
After the passage of the Kansas–Nebraska Act in 1854, Free Soilers joined with other groups to form the Republican Party, which nominated political neophyte John C. Frémont for president in 1856.
Free Soil performance in the 1848 election; darker shades of green indicate greater support
Frederick Douglass served as the secretary of the 1852 Free Soil National Convention

The Free Soil Party formed during the 1848 presidential election, which took place in the aftermath of the Mexican–American War and debates over the extension of slavery into the Mexican Cession.

After the Whig Party and the Democratic Party nominated presidential candidates who were unwilling to rule out the extension of slavery into the Mexican Cession, anti-slavery Democrats and Whigs joined with members of the abolitionist Liberty Party to form the new Free Soil Party.

Running as the Free Soil presidential candidate, former President Martin Van Buren won 10.1 percent of the popular vote, the strongest popular vote performance by a third party up to that point in U.S. history.

Several Northern congressmen subsequently defeated an attempt by President Polk and Senator Lewis Cass to extend the Missouri Compromise line to the Pacific.

Shortly after the Democrats nominated Cass, a group of Whigs made plans for a convention of anti-slavery politicians and activists in case the 1848 Whig National Convention nominated General Zachary Taylor of Louisiana for president.