1904 Democratic National Convention

Nominees Parker and Davis
Opening session of the convention
Representative William Randolph Hearst of New York
Senator Francis Cockrell of Missouri
Former Secretary of State Richard Olney of Massachusetts
Former State Representative Edward C. Wall of Wisconsin
Former Senator George Gray of Delaware
Former General-in-Chief Nelson A. Miles of Massachusetts
Representative John Sharp Williams of Mississippi
William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska<ref>{{cite news|title=Bryan Back, is Not a Candidate|work=The New York Times|date=January 10, 1904|url=https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1904/01/10/118942259.pdf }}</ref>
Former President Grover Cleveland of New York
<center>1st Presidential Ballot Before Shifts</center>
<center>1st Presidential Ballot After Shifts</center>
Former Senator Henry G. Davis of West Virginia
Representative James R. Williams of Illinois
Former Senator George Turner of Washington
Former Senator William A. Harris of Kansas
<center>1st Vice Presidential Ballot</center>

American presidential nominating convention that ran from July 6 through 10 in the Coliseum of the St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall in St. Louis, Missouri.

- 1904 Democratic National Convention
Nominees Parker and Davis

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1904 United States presidential election

The 30th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1904.

The 30th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1904.

At 80, Davis is the oldest major party candidate ever nominated for national office.
Parker/Davis campaign poster
Debs/Hanford campaign poster
Parker campaign button
"The Mysterious Stranger" – A political cartoon showing Missouri having left the Solid South by voting Republican.
Map of presidential election results by county
650px
<center>President Theodore Roosevelt</center>
<center>Senator Mark Hanna from Ohio (died February 15, 1904) </center>
<center>Chief Judge Alton B. Parker from New York</center>
<center>Representative William Randolph Hearst from New York</center>
<center>Senator Francis Cockrell from Missouri</center>
<center>Richard Olney Former U.S. Secretary of State from Massachusetts</center>
<center>William Jennings Bryan from Nebraska (declined on Jan 10)<ref>{{cite news|title=Bryan Back, is Not a Candidate|work=The New York Times|date=January 10, 1904|url=https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1904/01/10/118942259.pdf }}</ref></center>
<center>Former President Grover Cleveland from New Jersey<center> (declined)</center>
<center>Edward C. Wall from Wisconsin</center>
<center>George Gray from Delaware</center>
<center>Representative John Sharp Williams from Mississippi</center>
<center>Lieutenant General Nelson A. Miles from Massachusetts</center>
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Map of Republican presidential election results by county
Map of Democratic presidential election results by county
Map of "other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "other" presidential election results by county

The conservative Bourbon Democrat allies of former President Grover Cleveland temporarily regained control of the Democratic Party from the followers of William Jennings Bryan, and the 1904 Democratic National Convention nominated Alton B. Parker, Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals.

Henry Gassaway Davis

Millionaire and Senator from West Virginia.

Millionaire and Senator from West Virginia.

Henry G. Davis
Parker/Davis campaign poster
Davis in 1911

The 1904 Democratic National Convention nominated a ticket of Alton B. Parker for president and Davis for vice president.

Nelson A. Miles

Nelson A. Miles

American military general who served in the American Civil War, the American Indian Wars, and the Spanish–American War.

American military general who served in the American Civil War, the American Indian Wars, and the Spanish–American War.

Nelson A. Miles
Miles during the Civil War
Mary Hoyt Sherman
General Miles in the field.
General Nelson Miles and other soldiers on horseback in Puerto Rico in 1898
Cartoon by Bob Satterfield about Miles' retirement in August 1903
General Miles in 1903.
80px
Gen. Miles' funeral

A year later, standing as a presidential candidate at the Democratic National Convention, he received a handful of votes.

1888 illustration

St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall

Indoor exposition hall, Music Hall and arena in St. Louis, Missouri from 1883 to 1907.

Indoor exposition hall, Music Hall and arena in St. Louis, Missouri from 1883 to 1907.

1888 illustration
1901 postcard
Arena/convention hall in 1904

Three national presidential nominating conventions were held in three separate buildings in or near the complex between 1888 and 1904 including the 1888 Democratic National Convention, 1896 Republican National Convention, and 1904 Democratic National Convention.

William Jennings Bryan

American lawyer, orator and politician.

American lawyer, orator and politician.

Bryan's birthplace in Salem, Illinois
Attorney Mary Baird Bryan, the wife of William Jennings Bryan
A young Bryan
"UNITED SNAKES OF AMERICA" "IN BRYAN WE TRUST" political satire token of 1896, known as "Bryan Money"
Bryan campaigning for president, October 1896
1896 electoral vote results
The United States and its colonial possessions after the Spanish–American War
Conservatives in 1900 ridiculed Bryan's eclectic platform.
1900 electoral vote results
William J Bryan in 1906 as Moses with new 10 commandments; Puck 19 sept 1906 by Joseph Keppler. Tablet reads: l-Thou shalt have no other leaders before me. II—Thou shalt not make unto thyself any high Protective Tariff. Ill—Eight hours, and no more, shalt thou labor and do all thy work. IV—Thou shalt not graft. V—Thou shalt not elect thy Senators save by Popular Vote. VI—Thou shalt not grant rebates unto thy neighbor. VII—Thou shalt not make combinations in restraint of trade. VIII—Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's income, but shall make him pay a tax upon it. IX—There shall be no more government by injunction. X—Remember Election Day to vote it early. P.S.— When in doubt, ask Me.
Bryan speaking at the 1908 Democratic National Convention
Presidential Campaign button for Bryan
1908 electoral vote results
Bryan attending the 1912 Democratic National Convention
Bryan served as Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson
Cartoon of Secretary of State Bryan reading war news in 1914
Villa Serena, Bryan's home built in 1913 at Miami, Florida
Charles W. and William J. Bryan
At the Scopes Trial, William Jennings Bryan (seated, left) being questioned by Clarence Darrow (standing, right).
Statue of Bryan on the lawn of the Rhea County courthouse in Dayton, Tennessee

Prior to the 1904 Democratic National Convention, Alton B. Parker, a New York judge and conservative ally of David Hill, was seen as the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Francis Cockrell

Confederate military commander and American politician from the state of Missouri.

Confederate military commander and American politician from the state of Missouri.

Cockrell in military uniform, January 1864
Relief portrait by Allen George Newman at Vicksburg National Military Park

He received 42 votes for President of the United States at the 1904 Democratic National Convention, but was defeated by Alton B. Parker.

Gray c. 1899

George Gray (Delaware politician)

United States senator from Delaware and a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and the United States Circuit Courts for the Third Circuit.

United States senator from Delaware and a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and the United States Circuit Courts for the Third Circuit.

Gray c. 1899

Gray was proposed as a nominee for the Presidency at the 1904 and 1908 Democratic Conventions.

Edward C. Wall

American grain commission merchant and Democratic Party politician from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

American grain commission merchant and Democratic Party politician from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

He received 27 of 1,000 votes on the first ballot at the national convention, coming in fifth.

John A. Maguire

For the Scottish archbishop, see John Aloysius Maguire

For the Scottish archbishop, see John Aloysius Maguire

He was a delegate to the 1904 Democratic National Convention and the secretary to the Democratic State committee in 1905.

George B. McClellan Jr.

American statesman, author, historian, and educator.

American statesman, author, historian, and educator.

McClellan ran for president in 1904, receiving 3 votes on the first ballot at the Democratic National Convention.