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Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The Liberals, led by Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a landslide majority at the election.
Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1905 and then won a landslide victory in the following year's general election.

Henry Campbell-Bannerman

Sir Henry Campbell-BannermanCampbell-BannermanC.-Bannerman
The Liberals, led by Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a landslide majority at the election.
Following a general election defeat in 1900, Campbell-Bannerman went on to lead the Liberal Party to a landslide victory over the Conservative Party at the 1906 general election, also the last election in which the Liberals gained an overall majority in the House of Commons.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The Conservatives led by Arthur Balfour, who had been in government until the month before the election, lost more than half their seats, including party leader Balfour's own seat in Manchester East, leaving them with their lowest-ever number of seats.
In 1886, the party formed an alliance with Spencer Compton Cavendish, Lord Hartington (later the 8th Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain's new Liberal Unionist Party and, under the statesmen Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Lord Salisbury and Arthur Balfour, held power for all but three of the following twenty years before suffering a heavy defeat in 1906 when it split over the issue of free trade.

Arthur Balfour

BalfourLord BalfourA.J. Balfour
The Conservatives led by Arthur Balfour, who had been in government until the month before the election, lost more than half their seats, including party leader Balfour's own seat in Manchester East, leaving them with their lowest-ever number of seats.
He resigned as Prime Minister in December 1905 and the following month the Conservatives suffered a landslide defeat at the 1906 election, in which he lost his own seat.

1945 United Kingdom general election

1945 general election19451945 election
This has resulted in the 1906 general election being dubbed the "Liberal landslide", and is now ranked alongside the 1931, 1945, 1983 and 1997 general elections as one of the largest landslide election victories.
It was the first time the Conservatives had lost the popular vote since the 1906 election; they would not win it again until 1955.

1931 United Kingdom general election

19311931 general election1931 election
This has resulted in the 1906 general election being dubbed the "Liberal landslide", and is now ranked alongside the 1931, 1945, 1983 and 1997 general elections as one of the largest landslide election victories.

1997 United Kingdom general election

1997 general election19971997 election
This has resulted in the 1906 general election being dubbed the "Liberal landslide", and is now ranked alongside the 1931, 1945, 1983 and 1997 general elections as one of the largest landslide election victories.
However, a series of scandals, party division over the European Union, the events of Black Wednesday and a desire of the electorate for change after 18 years of Conservative rule all contributed to the Conservatives' worst defeat since 1906, with only 165 MPs elected to Westminster, as well as their lowest share of the vote since 1832.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
The Labour Representation Committee was far more successful than at the 1900 general election and after the election would be renamed the Labour Party with 29 MPs and Keir Hardie as leader.
In the 1906 election, the LRC won 29 seats—helped by a secret 1903 pact between Ramsay MacDonald and Liberal Chief Whip Herbert Gladstone that aimed to avoid splitting the opposition vote between Labour and Liberal candidates in the interest of removing the Conservatives from office.

Keir Hardie

KeirKeir Hardie MP(James) Keir Hardie
The Labour Representation Committee was far more successful than at the 1900 general election and after the election would be renamed the Labour Party with 29 MPs and Keir Hardie as leader.
After the 1906 election, Hardie was chosen as the Labour Party's first parliamentary leader.

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
This election was a landslide defeat for the Conservative Party and their Liberal Unionist allies, with the primary reason given by historians as the party's weakness after its split over the issue of free trade (Joseph Chamberlain had resigned from government in September 1903 in order to campaign for Tariff Reform, which would allow "preferential tariffs").
He obtained the support of most Unionist MPs for this stance, but the Unionists suffered a landslide defeat at the 1906 general election.

Liberal welfare reforms

welfare reformsliberal reformsreforms
The Liberal's landslide victory of 125 seats over all other parties led to the passing of social legislation known as the Liberal reforms.
The Liberal welfare reforms (1906–1914) were a series of acts of social legislation passed by the British Liberal Party after the 1906 General Election.

Manchester East (UK Parliament constituency)

Manchester EastEastEast Division
The Conservatives led by Arthur Balfour, who had been in government until the month before the election, lost more than half their seats, including party leader Balfour's own seat in Manchester East, leaving them with their lowest-ever number of seats.

Unionist government, 1895–1905

Salisbury (III & IV)CoalitionConservative administration
The Unionist government had become deeply divided over the issue of free trade, which soon became an electoral liability.
In the general election which followed in 1906, all but three members of Balfour's Cabinet lost their seats, including Balfour himself.

Liberal Unionist Party

Liberal UnionistLiberal UnionistsUnionist
This election was a landslide defeat for the Conservative Party and their Liberal Unionist allies, with the primary reason given by historians as the party's weakness after its split over the issue of free trade (Joseph Chamberlain had resigned from government in September 1903 in order to campaign for Tariff Reform, which would allow "preferential tariffs").
In the 1906 General Election, the Liberal Unionists (both Free Traders and Tariff Reformers) shared the same fate as their Conservative allies, with a big reduction in their parliamentary strength.

Irish Parliamentary Party

Irish ParliamentaryNationalistIrish Nationalists
The Irish Parliamentary Party, led by John Redmond, achieved its seats with a relatively low number of votes, as 73 candidates stood unopposed.
The 1906 general election saw the Liberals back in power with 379 seats, an overwhelming majority of 88 over all other parties, after they had promised Home Rule.

John Redmond

RedmondJohn Edward RedmondMr. Redmond
The Irish Parliamentary Party, led by John Redmond, achieved its seats with a relatively low number of votes, as 73 candidates stood unopposed.
An electoral swing to the Liberal Party in the 1906 general election renewed Redmond's opportunities for working with government policy.

Tariff Reform League

Tariff Reformtariff reform movement
This election was a landslide defeat for the Conservative Party and their Liberal Unionist allies, with the primary reason given by historians as the party's weakness after its split over the issue of free trade (Joseph Chamberlain had resigned from government in September 1903 in order to campaign for Tariff Reform, which would allow "preferential tariffs").
Tariff Reform split the MPs of the Conservative Party and their government coalition allies in the Liberal Unionist Party and was the major factor in its landslide defeat in 1906 to the Liberals who advocated Free Trade.

List of MPs elected in the 1906 United Kingdom general election

28th28th ParliamentMPs
MPs elected in the United Kingdom general election, 1906
This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the 28th Parliament of the United Kingdom at the 1906 general election, held over several days from 12 January to 8 February 1906.

List of United Kingdom Parliament constituencies (1885–1918)

670 seatsnew parliamentary constituencies
This is a list of all constituencies that were in existence in the 1885, 1886, 1892, 1895, 1900, 1906, January 1910, and December 1910 general elections.

Austen Chamberlain

Sir Austen ChamberlainChamberlainAusten
Only three of the Conservative cabinet which had served until December 1905 (one month before the election) held onto their seats, former Chancellor Austen Chamberlain, former Home Secretary Aretas Akers-Douglas, and former Secretary of State for War Hugh Arnold-Forster.
Facing a resurgent Liberal opposition and the threat of an internal party split, Balfour eventually took the Unionists into opposition in December 1905, and in the ensuing rout in the election of 1906, Austen found himself one of the few surviving Liberal Unionists in the House of Commons.

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
The Boer War had also contributed to the unpopularity of the Conservative and Unionist government.
However public support quickly waned as it became apparent that the war would not be easy and it dragged on, partially contributing to the Conservatives' spectacular defeat in 1906.

Thomas Gardner Horridge

Mr Justice HorridgeHorridge JHorridge, Thomas Gardner
The result in Manchester East saw a large 22.4% swing to the Liberal candidate Thomas Gardner Horridge, much larger than the national 5.4% swing to the Liberals.
In 1906 he was elected as Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) for Manchester East, spectacularly unseating the former Conservative prime minister, Arthur Balfour.

Nonconformist

non-conformistnonconformistsNonconformity
Protestant Nonconformists were angered when Conservatives pushed through the Education Act 1902, which integrated denominational schools into the state system and provided for their support from taxes.
The education issue played a major role in the Liberal victory in the 1906 general election, as Dissenter Conservatives punished their old party and voted Liberal.

Education Act 1902

1902 Education ActEducation Act of 1902Education Bill
Protestant Nonconformists were angered when Conservatives pushed through the Education Act 1902, which integrated denominational schools into the state system and provided for their support from taxes.
The Act developed into a major political issue, which contributed significantly to the Liberal Party defeating the Conservatives in the General Election in 1906.

Landslide victory

landslidelandslide electionlandslide victories
The Liberals, led by Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a landslide majority at the election.