1917 Guatemala earthquake

1917-1918 earthquakesEarthquakeEarthquakes19171917-18 earthquakes1917–18 earthquakes1917–1918 earthquakesa powerful earthquakeearthquakes of 1917–18
The 1917 Guatemala earthquake was a sequence of tremors that lasted from 17 November 1917 through 24 January 1918.wikipedia
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Guatemala City

Guatemala City, GuatemalaCiudad de GuatemalaGuatemala
They gradually increased in intensity until they almost completely destroyed Guatemala City and severely damaged the ruins in Antigua Guatemala that had survived the 1773 Guatemala earthquakes. In 1920, Prince Wilhelm of Sweden arrived to Guatemala on a trip along Central America; his journey took him to Antigua Guatemala and Guatemala City where he saw that the recovery efforts were still not done and the city still lay in ruins.
The city was almost completely destroyed by the 1917–18 earthquakes.

Antigua Guatemala

AntiguaAntigua, GuatemalaSanto Domingo neighborhood
They gradually increased in intensity until they almost completely destroyed Guatemala City and severely damaged the ruins in Antigua Guatemala that had survived the 1773 Guatemala earthquakes. In 1920, Prince Wilhelm of Sweden arrived to Guatemala on a trip along Central America; his journey took him to Antigua Guatemala and Guatemala City where he saw that the recovery efforts were still not done and the city still lay in ruins.
His book is an objective description of the terrible conditions the road and the ruins used to be in: "For some little way outside Guatemala City it was a fairly decent car ride, but then the roads began developing sand drifts, and later, rockfalls of tumbled stone as two years earlier, the country had been devastated by a powerful earthquake and government corruption made the recovery impossible".

Guatemala City General Cemetery

It was at the Guatemala City General Cemetery that the devastation was most evident: all was demolished on the night of the earthquake and it was said that about eight thousand dead were shaken from their graves, threatening pestilence to the city and forcing the authorities to burn all of them in a gigantic bonfire.
Ruined by 1917-18 earthquakes, it never recovered its old splendor; originally it was exclusive for the elites and presidents, but gradually the eight Mayan hills that form it were invaded without any urban plan, like what happened with Guatemala City itself after the 1917-18 and 1976 earthquakes.

José María Reina Barrios

José María Reyna BarriosReyna BarriosJose Maria Reina Barrios
Among those buildings destroyed by the earthquakes were a lot of the infrastructure built by general José María Reyna Barrios and president Manuel Estrada Cabrera, whose legacy has been forgotten by Guatemalans.
Due to the 1917-1918 earthquakes most of these structures were lost.

Manuel Estrada Cabrera

Manuel José Estrada CabreraManuel EstradaEstrada Cabrera, Manuel
Among those buildings destroyed by the earthquakes were a lot of the infrastructure built by general José María Reyna Barrios and president Manuel Estrada Cabrera, whose legacy has been forgotten by Guatemalans.
Opposition to his regime started after the 1917–1918 earthquakes as it was evident that the President was incapable of leading the recovery efforts.

Cathedral of Guatemala City

Metropolitan CathedralCathedralPrimatial Metropolitan Cathedral of St. James
Damage by the devastating earthquakes of 1917 and 1976 has been repaired.

Guatemala

GuatemalanRepublic of GuatemalaGTM
Guatemala City was badly damaged in the 1917 Guatemala earthquake.

Diario de Centro América

Diario de Centro AmericaJournal of Central America
The Diario de Centro América, a semi-official newspaper owned in part by President Estrada Cabrera, spent more than two months issuing two numbers a day reporting on the damage, but after a while, started criticizing the central government after the slow and inefficient recovery efforts.

Prince Wilhelm, Duke of Södermanland

Prince WilhelmPrince Vilhelm, Duke of SödermanlandWilhelm of Sweden
In 1920, Prince Wilhelm of Sweden arrived to Guatemala on a trip along Central America; his journey took him to Antigua Guatemala and Guatemala City where he saw that the recovery efforts were still not done and the city still lay in ruins. Finally, Prince Wilhelm, pointed out that the world had sent help in the form of money and goods, which arrived by shipload in Puerto Barrios, but neither helped the city because millions found their way to the President's treasury and his ministers sent provisions to Honduras and sold them there for a good profit.

Carrera Theater (Guatemala)

Carrera Theatertheater
Public buildings, schools, churches, the theater, and museums were all in the hopeless state of desolation in which they were left by the earthquake.

Puerto Barrios

Puerto Barrios, GuatemalaPuente Barrios, Izabal
Finally, Prince Wilhelm, pointed out that the world had sent help in the form of money and goods, which arrived by shipload in Puerto Barrios, but neither helped the city because millions found their way to the President's treasury and his ministers sent provisions to Honduras and sold them there for a good profit.

Miguel Ángel Asturias

Miguel Angel AsturiasMiguel AsturiasMiguel Ángel '''Asturias
For instance, in an interview done in 1970, German literary critic Günter W. Lorenz asked 1967 Literature Nobel Laureate Miguel Ángel Asturias why he started writing; to his question, Asturios replied: "Yes, at 10:25 p.m of 25 December 1917, an earthquake destroyed my city. I remember seeing something like an immense cloud covering the moon. I was in a cellar, a hole in the ground or a cave, or something like that. Right there and then I wrote my first poem, a goodbye song to Guatemala. Later on I was really mad by the circumstances under which the rubble was removed and by the social injustice that became really apparent then."

El Señor Presidente

This experience prompted Asturias to start writing when he was 18 years old; he wrote a tale called The political beggars (Los mendigos políticos), which eventually became his most famous novel: El Señor Presidente.

Criollo people

criollocriollosCreole
For the first time, the Catholic Church opposed the President; additionally, Cobos Batres was able to inflame the nationality sentiment of conservative criollo leaders José Azmitia, Tácito Molina, Eduardo Camacho, Julio Bianchi and Emilio Escamilla into forming a Central America Unionist party and oppose the strong regime of Estrada Cabrera.

Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala

University of San Carlos of GuatemalaUniversidad de San CarlosUniversity of San Carlos
The Unionist party began its activities with the support of several sectors of the Guatemala City society, among them the Universidad Estrada Cabrera students and the labor associations, who under the leadership of Silverio Ortiz founded the Patriotic Labor Committee.

History of Guatemala City

Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción
Earthquakes in 1917–1918 destroyed many historic structures.

Tragic Week (Guatemala)

fighting taking place in Guatemala CitySemana Tragica
Opposition to his regime started after the 1917-1918 earthquakes as it was evident that the President was incapable of leading the recovery efforts.

Carmen Lind Pettersen

Earthquakes in Guatemala between 1917 and 1918 had devastated the country and in 1923, Arthur was asked to return to the country.

National Library of Guatemala

Biblioteca Nacional de GuatemalaBiblioteca NacionalNational Library
After the earthquakes of 1917–18 it was moved back to No.

Avenida Reforma

Avenida de la Reforma
The 1917-1918 earthquakes destroyed many of the buildings along the boulevard, including the Reforma Palace.