1918 United Kingdom general election

1918 general election19181918 election1918 UK general electiongeneral electiongeneral election of 1918general election in December 1918general election in 1918December 1918 general electionDecember 1918
The 1918 United Kingdom general election was called immediately after the Armistice with Germany which ended the First World War, and was held on Saturday, 14 December 1918.wikipedia
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1918 Irish general election

1918 general election1918general election of 1918
The election was also noted for the dramatic result in Ireland, which showed clear disapproval of government policy.
The Irish general election of 1918 was that part of the 1918 United Kingdom general election which took place in Ireland.

History of the United Kingdom during the First World War

First World WarBritainBritish home front during the First World War
The 1918 United Kingdom general election was called immediately after the Armistice with Germany which ended the First World War, and was held on Saturday, 14 December 1918.
Debates continue about the impact the war had on women's emancipation, given that a large number of women were granted the vote for the first time in 1918.

David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon David Lloyd GeorgeDavid Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor
The governing coalition, under Prime Minister David Lloyd George, sent letters of endorsement to candidates who supported the coalition government.
In the aftermath, he and the Conservatives maintained their coalition with popular support following the December 1918 "Coupon" election.

Coalition Coupon

Coalition ConservativeCoalition LiberalCoalition Unionist
These were nicknamed "Coalition Coupons", and led to the election being known as the "coupon election".
The Coalition Coupon was a letter sent to parliamentary candidates at the 1918 United Kingdom general election, endorsing them as official representatives of the Coalition Government.

Coalition Labour

Co Labsupporter of the Coalition
159 Liberal, 364 Conservative, 20 National Democratic and Labour, and 2 Coalition Labour candidates received the coupon.
Coalition Labour was a description used by candidates in the 1918 General Election who identified with the labour movement, and in most cases were former Labour Party Members of Parliament, but supported the ruling coalition.

Nina Boyle

One woman, Nina Boyle, had already presented herself for a by election earlier in the year in Keighley but had been turned down by the returning officer on technical grounds.
In April 1918, she was the first woman to submit a nomination to stand for election to the House of Commons, which paved the way for other female candidates in the December 1918 general election.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The result was a massive landslide in favour of the coalition, comprising primarily the Conservatives and Coalition Liberals, with massive losses for Liberals who were not endorsed.
In late 1916 Liberal David Lloyd George became prime minister but the Liberals soon split and the Conservatives dominated the government, especially after their landslide in the 1918 election.

Khaki election

khakikhaki" electionexploited by the government
This election was known as a khaki election, due to the immediate postwar setting and the role of the demobilised soldiers.
The term was later used to describe two later elections like the 1918 general election, fought at the end of World War I, which resulted in a huge victory for David Lloyd George's wartime coalition government and the 1945 general election, held during the closing stages of World War II, where the Labour Party leader Clement Attlee won by a landslide.

Parliament (Qualification of Women) Act 1918

Qualification of Women ActParliament (Qualification of Women) Act
It was the first parliamentary election in which women were able to stand as candidates following the Parliament (Qualification of Women) Act 1918, believed to be one of the shortest Acts of Parliament ever given Royal Assent.
Parliament hurriedly passed the Parliament (Qualification of Women) Act in time to enable women to stand in the general election of December 1918.

Northampton (UK Parliament constituency)

NorthamptonNorthampton (seat 1/2)Northampton constituency
It returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom until its representation was reduced to one member for the 1918 general election.

Bedford (UK Parliament constituency)

BedfordBedford (seat 1/2)Bedford constituency
The town was growing, and Bedford retained its borough status until the 1918 general election, although under the Redistribution of Seats Act, 1885, its representation was reduced to a single MP.

Alice Lucas (politician)

Alice Theresa LucasAlice Lucas
Alice Theresa Lucas born Alice Theresa Stern (6 May, 1853 – 3 May, 1924) was a British parliamentary candidate in the 1918 General Election.

Whitechapel and St Georges (UK Parliament constituency)

Whitechapel and St GeorgesWhitechapel and St GeorgeWhitechapel and St. George
It was created for the 1918 general election, largely replacing the old Stepney constituency.

Woolwich East (UK Parliament constituency)

Woolwich EastGreenwich, Woolwich, EastEast Woolwich
The constituency was formed for the 1918 general election, when the constituency of Woolwich was divided into Woolwich East and Woolwich West, and abolished in 1983 when it was largely replaced by a new Woolwich constituency.

Battersea North (UK Parliament constituency)

Battersea NorthWandsworth, Battersea, NorthNorthern division of Battersea
It was created for the 1918 general election, when the former Battersea constituency was divided in two.

Ramsay MacDonald

James Ramsay MacDonaldMacDonaldRt Hon. Ramsay MacDonald
Labour could only slightly increase their number of seats, however, from 42 to 57 and some of their earlier leaders including Ramsay MacDonald and Arthur Henderson lost their seats.
As the war dragged on, his reputation recovered but he still lost his seat in the 1918 "Coupon Election", which saw the Liberal David Lloyd George's coalition government win a large majority.

National Democratic and Labour Party

National Democratic PartyCoalition National DemocraticNDP
159 Liberal, 364 Conservative, 20 National Democratic and Labour, and 2 Coalition Labour candidates received the coupon.
The party fielded twenty-eight candidates in the 1918 general election—twenty of them on the Coalition Coupon—and won ten seats, including Barnes in the Glasgow Gorbals constituency.

Leader of the Opposition (United Kingdom)

Leader of the OppositionLeader of the Opposition in the House of LordsOpposition Leader
Labour became the Official Opposition for the first time, but they lacked an official leader and so the Leader of the Opposition for the next fourteen months was the stand-in Liberal leader Donald Maclean (Asquith, having lost his seat at this election, was not returned until a by-election in February 1920).
He retained that post until he was defeated in the 1918 United Kingdom general election.

Arthur Henderson

HendersonRt Hon. Arthur HendersonThe Right Honourable '''Arthur Henderson
Labour could only slightly increase their number of seats, however, from 42 to 57 and some of their earlier leaders including Ramsay MacDonald and Arthur Henderson lost their seats.
Henderson lost his seat in the "Coupon Election" of 14 December 1918, which had been announced within twenty-four hours of the end of hostilities and which resulted in a landslide victory for a coalition formed by Lloyd George.

Burslem (UK Parliament constituency)

BurslemStoke-on-Trent, BurslemBurslem constituency
The constituency was created for the 1918 general election, and abolished for the 1950 general election.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The result was a massive landslide in favour of the coalition, comprising primarily the Conservatives and Coalition Liberals, with massive losses for Liberals who were not endorsed.
In the 1918 general election, Lloyd George, hailed as "the Man Who Won the War", led his coalition into a khaki election.

North West Staffordshire (UK Parliament constituency)

North West StaffordshireStaffordshire North WestStaffordshire, North West
The constituency was created for the 1885 general election, and abolished for the 1918 general election.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
The Labour Party, led by William Adamson, fought the election independently, as did those Liberals who did not receive a coupon.
The Labour Party was defeated heavily in the 1983 general election, winning only 27.6% of the vote, its lowest share since 1918, and receiving only half a million votes more than the SDP-Liberal Alliance who leader Michael Foot condemned for "siphoning" Labour support and enabling the Conservatives to greatly increase their majority of parliamentary seats.

Walthamstow West (UK Parliament constituency)

Walthamstow WestWalthamstow WWalthamstow West BC
The constituency was created for the 1918 general election, and abolished for the February 1974 general election, when it was combined with part of the former Walthamstow East to form the new Walthamstow constituency.