1925 serum run to Nome

Serum run to NomeGreat Race of Mercy1925 Serum Rundelivery of diphtheria serum in 1925Race to Nomerelaysaving thousands of people from an epidemic of diphtheria in 1925serum in Nome, AlaskaThe Serum Run
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.wikipedia
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Nome, Alaska

NomeNome, AKAnvil Mountain, Alaska
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.
A relay of dog sled teams was organized to deliver the serum.

Leonhard Seppala

Leonard SeppalaLeonhard SeppäläNew England Invitational Dog Sled Race
Summers' employee, the Norwegian Leonhard Seppala, was chosen for the 630-mile (1,014 km) round trip from Nome to Nulato and back.
Leonhard "Sepp" Seppala (September 14, 1877 – January 28, 1967) was a Norwegian sled dog breeder, trainer and musher who played a pivotal role in the 1925 serum run to Nome and participated in the 1932 Winter Olympics.

Togo (dog)

Togofamous Alaskan husky
His lead dog, the 12-year-old Togo, was equally famous for his leadership, intelligence, and ability to sense danger.
Togo (October 17, 1913 – December 5, 1929) was the lead sled dog of Leonhard Seppala and his dog sled team in the 1925 serum run to Nome across central and northern Alaska.

List of individual dogs

List of famous dogsList of dogsList of dogs noted for being faithful after their master's death
Balto, the lead sled dog on the final stretch into Nome, became the most famous canine celebrity of the era after Rin Tin Tin, and his statue is a popular tourist attraction in both New York City's Central Park and downtown Anchorage, Alaska.

Mushing

musherdog mushermushers
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.
During the 1925 serum run to Nome, 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs relayed diphtheria antitoxin 674 mi by dog sled across the U.S. territory of Alaska in five and a half days, saving the small city of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.

Nenana, Alaska

NenanaNenana, AKNenana complex
One would start at Nenana and the other at Nome, and they would meet at Nulato.
Nenana was the starting point for the 1925 serum run to Nome, after diphtheria antitoxin had been transported by rail from Anchorage.

Diphtheria

diphteriadiptheriaDiphthera
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.
One of the most infamous outbreaks of diphtheria was in Nome, Alaska; the "Great Race of Mercy" to deliver diphtheria antitoxin is now celebrated by the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Central Park

Greensward PlanCentral Park, New YorkNew York's Central Park
Balto, the lead sled dog on the final stretch into Nome, became the most famous canine celebrity of the era after Rin Tin Tin, and his statue is a popular tourist attraction in both New York City's Central Park and downtown Anchorage, Alaska. A statue of Balto by sculptor Frederick Roth was unveiled in New York City's Central Park during a visit on December 15, 1925.
Balto (1925), a statue of Balto, the sled dog who became famous during the 1925 serum run to Nome, is located near East Drive and East 66th Street.

Sled dog

sled dogsdog sleddingdog team
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.
Togo was the lead sled dog of Leonhard Seppala and his dog sled team in the 1925 serum run to Nome across central and northern Alaska.

Scott Cordelle Bone

Scott BoneScott C. BoneBone
At Governor Scott Bone's order, it was packed and handed to conductor Frank Knight, who arrived in Nenana on January 27.
He is perhaps best known for making the decision to use dog sleds to transport diphtheria antitoxin 674 miles rather than use a plane in the now-famous 1925 Serum Run, (also known as the "Great Race of Mercy") from which the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race stems.

Siberian Husky

Siberian HuskiesHuskyHuskies
He had previously made the run from Nome to Nulato in a record-breaking four days, won the All-Alaska Sweepstakes three times, and had become something of a legend for his athletic ability and rapport with his Siberian huskies.
On February 3, 1925, Gunnar Kaasen was first in the 1925 serum run to Nome to deliver diphtheria serum from Nenana, over 600 miles to Nome.

Balto (film)

BaltoBalto III: Wings of Change1995 feature film
The 1995 animated film Balto was loosely based on the events of the final leg of the serum run, although all of the characters besides Balto and subplots are fictional.
The film is loosely based on a true story about the dog of the same name who helped save children infected by the diphtheria epidemic in the 1925 serum run to Nome.

Daniel Sutherland

Daniel A. SutherlandDan SutherlandDaniel Alexander Sutherland
Since both pilots were in the contiguous United States, Alaska Delegate Dan Sutherland attempted to get the authorization to use an inexperienced pilot, Roy Darling.
Governor Scott Bone ultimately decided to use a dog sled relay in what became known as the 1925 serum run to Nome, but in the 1930s aircraft did replace the dog sled as the primary form of transportation.

Carl Ben Eielson

Carl EielsonCarl Benjamin EielsonBen Eielson
In February 1924, the first winter aircraft flight in Alaska had been conducted between Fairbanks and McGrath by Carl Eielson, who flew a reliable De Havilland DH-4 issued by the U.S. Post Office on eight experimental trips.

Balto

List of ''Balto'' charactersBalto (dog)character in the 1995 film ''Balto
Balto, the lead sled dog on the final stretch into Nome, became the most famous canine celebrity of the era after Rin Tin Tin, and his statue is a popular tourist attraction in both New York City's Central Park and downtown Anchorage, Alaska.
Balto (1919 – March 14, 1933) was a Siberian Husky and sled dog who led his team on the final leg of the 1925 serum run to Nome, in which diphtheria antitoxin was transported from Anchorage, Alaska, to Nenana, Alaska, by train and then to Nome by dog sled to combat an outbreak of the disease.

Frederick Roth

Frederick George Richard RothF. G. R. RothF.G. Roth
A statue of Balto by sculptor Frederick Roth was unveiled in New York City's Central Park during a visit on December 15, 1925.
The black Siberian Husky became famous during the 1925 serum run to Nome, which saved the children of the city from a diphtheria epidemic.

Seymour Reit

Seymour V. Reit
In 1976, the story was retold in Race against Death: A True Story of the Far North, by noted children's author Seymour Reit.

Antitoxin

antitoxinsantitoxicanti-toxin
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.

Dog sled

dogsleddogsleddingsled
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.

Territory of Alaska

Alaska TerritoryAlaskaterritory
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.

Epidemic

epidemicsplaguepestilence
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy and The Serum Run, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 mi in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.

Mass media

mediapressmedia company
Both the mushers and their dogs were portrayed as heroes in the newly popular medium of radio, and received headline coverage in newspapers across the United States.

Headline

headlinesnewspaper headlinearticle headlines
Both the mushers and their dogs were portrayed as heroes in the newly popular medium of radio, and received headline coverage in newspapers across the United States.

Newspaper

daily newspapernewspapersdaily
Both the mushers and their dogs were portrayed as heroes in the newly popular medium of radio, and received headline coverage in newspapers across the United States.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Both the mushers and their dogs were portrayed as heroes in the newly popular medium of radio, and received headline coverage in newspapers across the United States.