1929 United Kingdom general election

1929 general election19291929 electiongeneral election in May 19291929 UK general electiongeneral electiongeneral election of 1929United Kingdom general election1929 elections1929 general elections
The 1929 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday 30 May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament.wikipedia
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Second Baldwin ministry

Baldwin IIConservative GovernmentStanley Baldwin's Conservative government
By 1929, the Cabinet was being described by many as "old and exhausted".
His second ministry ended following the so-called "Flapper Election" of May 1929.

1926 United Kingdom general strike

General Strike1926 General StrikeGeneral Strike of 1926
The election was fought against a background of rising unemployment, with the memory of the 1926 general strike still fresh in voters' minds.
Workers have learnt a new sense of their oneness and their power.' In the 1929 general election, the Labour Party won more seats than any other party in Parliament for the first time in its history.

David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon David Lloyd GeorgeDavid Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor
The Liberal Party led by David Lloyd George regained some of the ground it had lost in the 1924 election, and held the balance of power.
Lloyd George led the Liberals from 1926 to 1931, putting forward innovative proposals for public works; this failed to convert into seats in 1929 and from 1931 he was a marginalised and mistrusted figure heading a small rump of breakaway Liberals opposed to the National Government.

Plaid Cymru

PCPlaidPlaid Genedlaethol Cymru
The 1929 election was the first general election to be contested by the newly formed Welsh nationalist party Plaid Cymru.
In the 1929 general election the party contested its first parliamentary constituency, Caernarvonshire, polling 609 votes, or 1.6% of the vote for that seat.

Hung parliament

hung assemblyHungpolitical deadlock
The 1929 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday 30 May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament.
The elections of 1929 resulted in the last hung parliament for many years; in the meantime, Labour had replaced the Liberals as one of the two dominating parties.

1951 United Kingdom general election

19511951 general election1951 election
It was the fifth of seven general elections under the secret ballot and the first of three under universal suffrage in which a party lost the popular vote (i.e. gained fewer popular votes than another party) but gained a plurality of seats—the others of the seven being 1852, 1874, January 1910, December 1910, 1951 and February 1974.
The others were January 1910, December 1910, 1929 and February 1974; it also happened in the 1874 election.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
In 1929 that party was Ramsay MacDonald's Labour Party, which won the most seats in the House of Commons for the first time, but failed to get an overall majority.
In the 1929 general election, the Labour Party became the largest in the House of Commons for the first time, with 287 seats and 37.1% of the popular vote.

February 1974 United Kingdom general election

February 1974 general electionFebruary 1974Feb 1974
It was the fifth of seven general elections under the secret ballot and the first of three under universal suffrage in which a party lost the popular vote (i.e. gained fewer popular votes than another party) but gained a plurality of seats—the others of the seven being 1852, 1874, January 1910, December 1910, 1951 and February 1974.
For the first time since 1929 the two largest political parties had received less than a combined share of 80% of the vote, and the Liberals had also won more than 10% of the vote.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The Liberal Party led by David Lloyd George regained some of the ground it had lost in the 1924 election, and held the balance of power.
In the 1929 general election, he made a final bid to return the Liberals to the political mainstream, with an ambitious programme of state stimulation of the economy called We Can Conquer Unemployment!, largely written for him by the Liberal economist John Maynard Keynes.

Ramsay MacDonald

James Ramsay MacDonaldMacDonaldRt Hon. Ramsay MacDonald
In 1929 that party was Ramsay MacDonald's Labour Party, which won the most seats in the House of Commons for the first time, but failed to get an overall majority.
At the May 1929 election, Labour won 288 seats to the Conservatives' 260, with 59 Liberals under Lloyd George holding the balance of power.

Dunbartonshire (UK Parliament constituency)

DunbartonshireDumbartonshireDunbartonshire (seat 1/1)
1918 boundaries were used also in the general elections of 1922, 1923, 1924, 1929, 1931, 1935 and 1945.

Representation of the People (Equal Franchise) Act 1928

Representation of the People Act 19281928Equal Franchise Act
The election was often referred to as the "Flapper Election", because it was the first election in which women aged 21–29 were allowed to vote, under the provisions of the Representation of the People Act 1928.
The Act added five million more women to the electoral roll and had the effect of making women a majority, 52.7%, of the electorate in the 1929 general election, which was termed the "Flapper Election".