1945 United Kingdom general election

1945 general election19451945 election1945 UK general electiongeneral electiongeneral election of 1945general election in July 1945July 1945 general election1945 electionsgeneral election of July 1945
The 1945 United Kingdom general election was held on 5 July 1945, with polls in some constituencies delayed until 12 July and in Nelson and Colne until 19 July, because of local wakes weeks.wikipedia
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Clement Attlee

AttleeEarl AttleeAttlee government
The result was an unexpected landslide victory for Clement Attlee's Labour Party, over Winston Churchill's Conservatives. Clement Attlee, Leader of the Labour Party, refused Winston Churchill's offer of continuing the wartime coalition until the Allied defeat of Japan.
He went on to lead the Labour Party to an unexpected landslide victory at the 1945 general election; forming the first Labour majority government, and a mandate to implement its postwar reforms.

United Kingdom general election records

largest ever achieved in a British general electionholds the recordnational swing
The 10.7% national swing from the Conservative Party to the Labour Party remains the largest ever achieved in a British general election.
1945 General Election - 11.8% swing from Conservative/National Liberal to Labour

Winston Churchill

ChurchillSir Winston ChurchillChurchill, Winston
The result was an unexpected landslide victory for Clement Attlee's Labour Party, over Winston Churchill's Conservatives. Clement Attlee, Leader of the Labour Party, refused Winston Churchill's offer of continuing the wartime coalition until the Allied defeat of Japan.
After the Conservatives' defeat in the 1945 general election, he became Leader of the Opposition.

Churchill war ministry

War CabinetCoalition Governmentwar-time Coalition Government
Clement Attlee, Leader of the Labour Party, refused Winston Churchill's offer of continuing the wartime coalition until the Allied defeat of Japan.
The war ministry was followed by the Churchill caretaker ministry which in turn lasted until 26 July 1945 when the results of the general election brought Labour into government, led by Clement Attlee.

Hugh Gaitskell

GaitskellMr GaitskellThe Right Honourable '''Hugh Gaitskell''' CBE
Future prominent figures who entered Parliament included Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot and Hugh Gaitskell.
An economics lecturer and wartime civil servant, he was elected to Parliament in 1945 and held office in Clement Attlee's governments, notably as Minister of Fuel and Power after the bitter winter of 1946–47, and eventually joining the Cabinet as Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Churchill caretaker ministry

Churchill Caretakercaretaker governmentCaretaker Min.
The caretaker government led by Churchill was heavily defeated; the Labour Party under Attlee's leadership won a landslide victory, gaining a majority of 145 seats.
King George VI the same day invited Churchill to form a government pending the general election.

Barbara Castle

Barbara Castle, Baroness Castle of BlackburnBarbara Anne CastleBarbara Betts
Future prominent figures who entered Parliament included Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot and Hugh Gaitskell.
Barbara Anne Castle, Baroness Castle of Blackburn, PC, GCOT (née Betts; 6 October 1910 – 3 May 2002) was a British Labour Party politician who was the Member of Parliament for Blackburn from 1945 to 1979, making her the longest-serving female MP in the history of the House of Commons until that record was broken in 2007 by Gwyneth Dunwoody.

Michael Foot

Foot, Michael The Right Honourable '''Michael FootMichael
Future prominent figures who entered Parliament included Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot and Hugh Gaitskell.
Foot served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and again from 1960 until he retired in 1992.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The result was an unexpected landslide victory for Clement Attlee's Labour Party, over Winston Churchill's Conservatives.
In May 1940, a more balanced coalition was formed, the National Government, which, under the leadership of Winston Churchill, saw the United Kingdom through World War II. However, the party lost the 1945 general election in a landslide to the resurgent Labour Party, who won their first ever majority government.

1906 United Kingdom general election

19061906 general election1906 election
It was the first time the Conservatives had lost the popular vote since the 1906 election; they would not win it again until 1955.
This has resulted in the 1906 general election being dubbed the "Liberal landslide", and is now ranked alongside the 1931, 1945, 1983 and 1997 general elections as one of the largest landslide election victories.

Harold Wilson

Wilsonwhite heat of technologySir Harold Wilson
Future prominent figures who entered Parliament included Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot and Hugh Gaitskell.
In the 1945 general election, Wilson won his seat in the Labour landslide.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
The result was an unexpected landslide victory for Clement Attlee's Labour Party, over Winston Churchill's Conservatives. Clement Attlee, Leader of the Labour Party, refused Winston Churchill's offer of continuing the wartime coalition until the Allied defeat of Japan.
At the end of the war in Europe, in May 1945, Labour resolved not to repeat the Liberals' error of 1918, and promptly withdrew from government, on trade union insistence, to contest the 1945 general election in opposition to Churchill's Conservatives.

Bootle (UK Parliament constituency)

BootleBootle Parliamentary constituencyBootle constituency
The Labour Party has held it continuously since the 1945 general election which saw two decades of steep decline in the profitability of Liverpool Docks, manufacturing and shipbuilding which employed many workers.

Thomas Skeffington-Lodge

Tom Skeffington-Lodge
Skeffington-Lodge fought Bedford at the 1945 general election and unexpectedly defeated the Conservative incumbent Richard Wells, by just 288 votes.

James Callaghan

CallaghanJim CallaghanJames Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff
Future prominent figures who entered Parliament included Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot and Hugh Gaitskell.
Callaghan won his Cardiff South seat at the 1945 UK general election (and would hold a Cardiff-area seat continuously until his retirement in 1987).

National Liberal Party (UK, 1931)

National LiberalLiberal NationalNational Liberal Party
The National Liberal Party fared even worse, losing two-thirds of its seats and falling behind the Liberals in seat count for the first time since the parties split in 1931.
After both parties' drubbing and the Labour Party's victory in the 1945 general election, the two factions made renewed attempts at reuniting.

Oliver Simmonds

Sir Oliver SimmondsSimmondsSimmonds Aerocessories
He held the seat until his defeat at the 1945 general election.

Percy Daines

He served as a Labour and Co-operative Party Member of Parliament for East Ham North from the 1945 general election until his death, and was on the national committee of the Co-operative Party.

Walter Monslow, Baron Monslow

Walter MonslowMonslow
Born in Wrexham, Monslow was elected at 1945 general election as Member of Parliament (MP) for Barrow-in-Furness, and held the seat until he retired from the House of Commons at the general election in March 1966.

George Wadsworth (politician)

George WadsworthWadsworth
At the 1945 general election, Wadsworth was elected Member of Parliament (MP) for the East Riding of Yorkshire constituency of Buckrose.

Percy Shurmer

In the 1945 general election, he won the Birmingham Sparkbrook constituency from the Conservative Member of Parliament, Leo Amery.

Walter Scott-Elliot

Scott-Elliot
At the 1945 general election, Scott-Elliot was elected as Labour Party Member of Parliament for Accrington.

Victor Yates

He was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Birmingham, Ladywood from the July 1945 general election, when he beat the Unionist incumbent, until his death in January 1969 at the age of 68. He had had a heart attack in the House of Commons in the preceding October.

Harold Macmillan

MacmillanHarold Macmillan, 1st Earl of StocktonMacmillan Government
Future Conservative Prime Minister Harold Macmillan lost his seat, returning to Parliament at a by-election later in the year.
Macmillan indeed lost Stockton in the landslide Labour victory of 1945, but returned to Parliament in the November 1945 by-election in Bromley.