1950s quiz show scandals

quiz show scandalsquiz show scandalscandalquiz-show scandals1950s quiz scandals1958 quiz-show scandalaccusations that it was riggeddiscovered to be riggedembroiled in allegationsfixing of 1950s quiz shows
The American quiz show scandals of the 1950s were a series of revelations that contestants of several popular television quiz shows were secretly given assistance by show producers, to prearrange the outcome of ostensibly fair competitions.wikipedia
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The $64,000 Question

The $64,000 ChallengeTake It or Leave It$64,000 Question
The $64,000 Question became the first big-money television quiz show during the 1950s.
The $64,000 Question was an American game show broadcast from 1955 to 1958, which became embroiled in the 1950s quiz show scandals.

Game show

quiz showgameshowreality game show
The American quiz show scandals of the 1950s were a series of revelations that contestants of several popular television quiz shows were secretly given assistance by show producers, to prearrange the outcome of ostensibly fair competitions.
In 1959, many of the higher stakes game shows were discovered to be rigged and ratings declines led to most of the primetime games being canceled.

Jack Barry (game show host)

Jack BarryBarryJack Barasch
In 1956, the Jack Barry-hosted game show Twenty-One featured a contestant, Herb Stempel, who had been coached by producer Dan Enright to allow his opponent, Charles Van Doren, to win the game.
Barry's reputation became tarnished due to his involvement in the 1950s quiz show scandals and the ensuing fallout affected his career for over a decade.

Charles Van Doren

Doren, Charles VanVan Doren, Charles
In 1956, the Jack Barry-hosted game show Twenty-One featured a contestant, Herb Stempel, who had been coached by producer Dan Enright to allow his opponent, Charles Van Doren, to win the game.
Charles Lincoln Van Doren (February 12, 1926 – April 9, 2019) was an American writer and editor who was involved in a television quiz show scandal in the 1950s.

Twenty-One (game show)

Twenty-OneTwenty OneVivienne Nearing
In 1956, the Jack Barry-hosted game show Twenty-One featured a contestant, Herb Stempel, who had been coached by producer Dan Enright to allow his opponent, Charles Van Doren, to win the game.
The program became notorious for being a rigged quiz show which nearly caused the demise of the entire genre in the wake of United States Senate investigations.

Herb Stempel

Herbert Stempel
In 1956, the Jack Barry-hosted game show Twenty-One featured a contestant, Herb Stempel, who had been coached by producer Dan Enright to allow his opponent, Charles Van Doren, to win the game.
Herbert Milton Stempel (born December 19, 1926) is an American television game show contestant and subsequent whistleblower on the fraudulent nature of the industry, in what became known as the 1950s quiz show scandals.

Joyce Brothers

Dr. Joyce BrothersDoctor Joyce Brothers
In 1955, Joyce Brothers first earned fame by becoming the first woman to earn the $64,000 prize.
In 1959, allegations that quiz shows were rigged, due to the Charles Van Doren controversy on the quiz show Twenty-One, began to surface and stirred controversy.

Quiz Show (film)

Quiz ShowThe Quiz ShowQuiz Show'' (film)
These elements of the scandal were portrayed in the 1994 movie Quiz Show. As a result, many contestants' reputations were tarnished.
The film chronicles the Twenty-One quiz show scandals of the 1950s, the rise and fall of popular contestant Charles Van Doren after the fixed loss of Herb Stempel and Congressional investigator Richard Goodwin's subsequent probe.

Dotto

Stempel's statements gained more credibility when match-fixing in another game, Dotto, was publicized in August 1958.
Soon after, Dotto was publicly revealed to have been fixed by its producer, tarnishing the show's reputation and setting the stage for legal and political investigation of the fixing of 1950s quiz shows.

New York Journal-American

New York JournalNew York AmericanNew York Journal American
A year later, Stempel told the New York Journal-Americans Jack O'Brian that his winning run as champion on the series had been choreographed to his advantage, and that the show's producer then ordered him to purposely lose his championship to Van Doren.
Jack O'Brian (1914–2000) was television critic for the Journal-American and exposed the 1958 quiz-show scandal that involved cheating on the popular television program Twenty-One.

Marie Winn

She is also known for writing The Plug-In Drug (1977), which explored the impact of television on young children, and for her involvement in the quiz show scandals of the 1950s.

Jack O'Brian

A year later, Stempel told the New York Journal-Americans Jack O'Brian that his winning run as champion on the series had been choreographed to his advantage, and that the show's producer then ordered him to purposely lose his championship to Van Doren.
O'Brian was pivotal in the exposure of the quiz show scandal centering on the quiz show Twenty-One.

The Joker's Wild

Joker! Joker! Joker!Snoop Dogg Presents The Joker's Wildgame show of the same name
Barry returned to hosting with The Generation Gap in 1969 and had success with The Joker's Wild, which premiered in 1972.
The show was billed as "the game where knowledge is king and lady luck is queen", and was notable for being the first successful game show produced by Jack Barry after his company's role in the quiz show scandals during the late 1950s.

Jack Narz

Hosts such as Jack Narz and Hal March continued to work on television after the scandals.
Narz eluded the infamous quiz show scandals to forge a respected hosting career.

Television

TVtelevisedtelevisions
The $64,000 Question became the first big-money television quiz show during the 1950s.
Perhaps due to the quiz show scandals in the 1950s, networks shifted to the magazine concept, introducing advertising breaks with multiple advertisers.

Oren Harris

He was the chairman of the Subcommittee on Legislative Oversight of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, where in 1959 he presided over hearings on the "quiz show scandal."

The Price Is Right (1956 American game show)

The Price Is Right1950s version of the show1956
The Price Is Right and CBS's slate of low-budget panel games were largely unaffected by the collapse; those shows would continue to air on network television into the mid-1960s, with The Price Is Right still offering lavish prizes throughout its prime time run.
The Price Is Right became one of the few game shows to survive the rigging scandals of the late 1950s, and gained even more popularity after other game shows exposed for being rigged had been cancelled.

The Generation Gap

The Generation Gap with Dennis Wholey
Barry returned to hosting with The Generation Gap in 1969 and had success with The Joker's Wild, which premiered in 1972.
Beginning the following week, he was replaced by Jack Barry in his first national hosting job since the quiz show scandals over a decade earlier forced him and his company out of the business.

House Subcommittee on Legislative Oversight

Subcommittee on Legislative OversightU.S. House Subcommittee on Legislative Oversight
During the 86th Congress the subcommittee was chaired by Representative Oren Harris, Democrat from Arkansas, and is famous for its hearings regarding the quiz show scandal of the 1950s as demonstrated in the Robert Redford film, Quiz Show.

Ralph Story

Sonny Fox, the original host of The $64,000 Challenge, left long before it could become tainted and became a popular children's host in the northeast, remembered best as the suave, genial host of the Sunday morning learn-and-laugh marathon Wonderama. Fox's replacement, Ralph Story, went on to become a newscaster for KNXT-TV/KCBS-TV in Los Angeles.
The CBS show was canceled in 1958 while several networks were embroiled in allegations that popular contestants were supplied with answers in advance.

Hal March

Sweeney and MarchSweeney and March Show
Hosts such as Jack Narz and Hal March continued to work on television after the scandals.
As a result of the quiz show scandals, the show was canceled and, with the exception of a few film roles such as Hear Me Good and Send Me No Flowers, March was out of work for nearly a decade.

100 Grand (game show)

100 Grand
A quiz for big money would not return until ABC premiered 100 Grand in 1963; it went off the air after three weeks.
The series ran for three episodes, weekly on Sunday nights from September 15 to 29, 1963 on the highly touted "New ABC" as the network's attempt to bring back high-stakes game shows after the quiz show scandals of 1958.

American game show winnings records

highest money-winner ever on American game showsall-time game show winnings recordall-time highest-earning regular-season contestant on a single American game show
Most daytime game show top prizes were limited to $25,000 during the 1960s and 1970s, a restriction made for both budgetary concerns and to assuage criticism that arose from the 1950s quiz show scandals.

Independent Broadcasting Authority

IBAIndependent Broadcasting Acts 1973, 1974 and 1978radio industry regulator
In 1960, this resulted in the Independent Television Authority's placement of a permanent winnings cap for ITV game shows of £1,000, which the Independent Broadcasting Authority increased to £6,000 in 1981 (though the British version of The $64,000 Question did receive special permission to offer £6,400 when it premiered in 1990).
In 1960, two years after the scandal in America, the Independent Television Authority (predecessor of the IBA) imposed a £1,000 cap on the value of prizes; this increased over the years to £6,000 in 1981, and was abolished in 1993.

Jackpot Bowling

Phillies Jackpot BowlingJackpot Bowling starring Milton Berle
NBC's comedy/game show Jackpot Bowling and ABC's more serious Make That Spare! were the only big-money game shows still on television after the fallout.
(NBC installed Berle as host in part because the network was desperate to burn off its 30-year contract with Berle, whose popularity had been in steady decline, and also to emphasize more comedy as the nation's taste for high-budget contests had waned in the wake of the 1950s quiz show scandals.) The professional bowler challenges were supplemented with a late-night-style monologue from Berle and segments of celebrities being interviewed by Berle and then rolling a shot for charity.