1955 United Kingdom general election

1955 general election19551955 electiongeneral election1955 UK general electiongeneral election in May 1955May 1955 general election1955 general electionsgeneral election of 1955General Election of May 1955
The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on 26 May 1955, four years after the previous general election.wikipedia
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Anthony Eden

Sir Anthony EdenEdenAnthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon
It resulted in a substantially increased majority of 60 for the Conservative government under new leader and prime minister Sir Anthony Eden; the result remains the largest party share of the vote in a post-war general election.
Having been deputy to Winston Churchill for almost 15 years, he succeeded him as the leader of the Conservative Party and prime minister in April 1955, and a month later won a general election.

Clement Attlee

AttleeEarl AttleeAttlee government
Labour then in its twentieth year of leadership by Clement Attlee, steadily lost ground owing to infighting between the left (Bevanites) and the right (Gaitskellites), resulting in an unclear election message.
He continued as Labour leader but retired after losing the 1955 election and was elevated to the House of Lords; after a long retirement, he died in 1967.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
It resulted in a substantially increased majority of 60 for the Conservative government under new leader and prime minister Sir Anthony Eden; the result remains the largest party share of the vote in a post-war general election.
The Conservatives were re-elected in 1955 and 1959 with larger majorities.

1951 United Kingdom general election

19511951 general election1951 election
The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on 26 May 1955, four years after the previous general election.
Additionally, most of Labour's overall popular vote margin can be accounted for as being the votes not polled by the Conservatives's Ulster Unionist allies in the four constituencies (all safe UUP seats) in which they were unopposed—the UUP would poll 166,400 votes in these four constituencies four years later.

Michael Foot

The Right Honourable '''Michael FootFootFoot, Michael
Future Labour leader Michael Foot lost his seat of Plymouth Devonport at this election; he returned for Ebbw Vale in a 1960 by-election.
Foot served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and again from 1960 until he retired in 1992.

Sinn Féin

SFProvisional Sinn FéinSinn Fein
The only real highlight of the night was in Northern Ireland, where Sinn Féin won two seats in a British election for the first time since 1918 (before the partition of Ireland).
At the 1955 United Kingdom general election, two Sinn Féin candidates were elected to Westminster, but the party's vote decreased at the following election in 1959, during the IRA's Border Campaign.

Orkney and Shetland (UK Parliament constituency)

Orkney and ShetlandOrkney and Shetland (seat 1/1)Orkney & Shetland
Five of their six seats did not have Conservative challengers, as per local-level agreements to avoid vote-splitting which likely would have thrown the seats to Labour; the only Liberal candidate to be victorious against both Conservative and Labour challengers was Orkney and Shetland MP Jo Grimond.
At each general election from 1955 until 1979, in 1987, 2010 and again in 2017 it was the safest Liberal Democrat seat in the UK.

Glasgow Camlachie (UK Parliament constituency)

Glasgow CamlachieCamlachieCamlachie Division
Glasgow Camlachie was a burgh constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until 1955.

Ashfield (UK Parliament constituency)

AshfieldAshfield CCAshfield constituency
To date almost always a Labour Party seat since its creation for the 1955 general election, the Ashfield constituency has been served by a former Secretary of State, Geoff Hoon, and since its creation for only two years has been served by one member of another party, Tim Smith of the Conservative Party, from 1977 to 1979.

BBC Parliament

The Parliamentary Channel
Only three hours of the coverage, presented by Richard Dimbleby, was kept; this was rebroadcast on BBC Parliament on the 50th and 60th anniversaries of the date of the election.
Since 2002, the channel has frequently shown recordings of BBC general election coverage, from the 1955 election, the first British election programme to be telerecorded, to the 2010 election and also recordings of the 1975 EEC Referendum and the 2016 EU Referendum.

Blackburn (UK Parliament constituency)

BlackburnBlackburn BCborough of Blackburn
Blackburn was re-established as a single-member constituency for the 1955 general election, partially replacing Blackburn East and Blackburn West.

Reading (UK Parliament constituency)

ReadingReading (seat 1/2)Parliamentary Borough of Reading
1955-1974: For the 1955 general election, Reading was re-established as Borough Constituency, replacing Reading North and Reading South and comprising the County Borough of Reading wards of Abbey, Battle, Castle, Caversham East, Caversham West, Church, Katesgrove, Minster, Redlands, Victoria, West.

Hackney Central (UK Parliament constituency)

Hackney CentralCentral HackneyHackney, Central
It was recreated for the 1955 general election, and abolished again for the 1983 general election.

Gaitskellism

GaitskelliteGaitskellitesgeneral supporter
Labour then in its twentieth year of leadership by Clement Attlee, steadily lost ground owing to infighting between the left (Bevanites) and the right (Gaitskellites), resulting in an unclear election message.
Following Labour's defeat in the 1955 election, Attlee announced his retirement as Party Leader (and subsequently, Leader of the Opposition).

Fulham (UK Parliament constituency)

FulhamFulham constituencyHammersmith, Fulham
It was represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until 1918 and from 1955 to 1997.

Fulham East (UK Parliament constituency)

Fulham EastEast FulhamFulham East BC
It was represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1918 to 1955.

Kingston upon Hull Central (UK Parliament constituency)

Kingston upon Hull CentralHull CentralCentral Hull
The constituency was created for the 1885 general election, and abolished for the 1955 general election.

Nottingham West (UK Parliament constituency)

Nottingham WestNottingham, WestNottingham West BC
However, a new Nottingham West constituency was created for the 1955 general election, and was in turn abolished for the 1983 general election.

Clement Davies

Clement Edward DaviesRt Hon. (Edward) Clement DaviesThe Rt Hon Clement Davies
The poor national showing was widely viewed as the death knell for the embattled leadership of Clement Davies, who resigned the following year and was replaced by Grimond.
In those of 1951 and 1955, the Liberals fell back even further, holding only 6 seats, with 2.5% and 2.7% of the vote respectively (although these vote shares were largely attributed to the huge drop in the number of seats the party fought).