1959 Tibetan uprising

1959 Tibetan RebellionTibetan uprisingLhasa Uprising19591959 uprisinguprising in Tibet1959 Revolution1959 unrest1959 unrest in Tibeta rebellion broke out
The 1959 Tibetan uprising or the 1959 Tibetan rebellion began on 10 March 1959, when a revolt erupted in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region, which had been under the effective control of the People's Republic of China since the Seventeen Point Agreement was reached in 1951.wikipedia
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Tibet Autonomous Region

TibetXizangXizang Province
The 1959 Tibetan uprising or the 1959 Tibetan rebellion began on 10 March 1959, when a revolt erupted in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region, which had been under the effective control of the People's Republic of China since the Seventeen Point Agreement was reached in 1951.
It was formally established in 1965 to replace the Tibet Area, an administrative division the People's Republic of China (PRC) took over from the Republic of China (ROC) about five years after the dismissal of the Kashag by the PRC following the 1959 Tibetan uprising, and about 13 years after Tibet's incorporation into the PRC in 1951.

14th Dalai Lama

Dalai LamaTenzin Gyatsothe Dalai Lama
In 1951, an agreement between the People's Republic of China and representatives of the Dalai Lama was put into effect.
During the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the Dalai Lama fled to India, where he currently lives as a refugee.

Tibetan Uprising Day

56th Tibetan National Uprising dayMarch 1959, an uprising
The anniversary of the uprising is observed by Tibetan exiles as the and Women's Uprising Day.
Tibetan Uprising Day, observed on March 10, commemorates the 1959 Tibetan uprising against the presence of the People's Republic of China in Tibet.

Serfs Emancipation Day

29 March 1959Serf liberation day
The anniversary of its end is officially celebrated in the Tibetan Autonomous Region as Serfs Emancipation Day.
Mao was surprised by the 1959 Tibetan uprising, which Chinese historians call an attempt by feudal lords to continue the system forever, but the Dalai Lama calls a "national uprising".

Lhasa

ChengguanChengguan DistrictLhasa, Tibet
The 1959 Tibetan uprising or the 1959 Tibetan rebellion began on 10 March 1959, when a revolt erupted in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region, which had been under the effective control of the People's Republic of China since the Seventeen Point Agreement was reached in 1951.
After the 14th Dalai Lama fled to India during the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the government converted the palace into a museum.

Mongolian and Tibetan Affairs Commission

Minister of Mongolian & Tibetan Affairs of TaiwanMinister of Mongolian and Tibetan Affairs Commission
The Mongolian and Tibetan Affairs Commission sent secret agents to India to disseminate pro-Kuomintang (KMT) and anti-Communist propaganda among Tibetan exiles.
After the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion, Chiang Kai-shek announced in his Letter to Tibetan Compatriots that the ROC's policy would be to help the Tibetan diaspora overthrow the People's Republic of China's rule in Tibet.

Tibetan diaspora

Tibetan exileTibetan refugeesTibetans in exile
After the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion, Chiang Kai-shek announced in his Letter to Tibetan Friends that the ROC's policy would be to help the Tibetan diaspora overthrow the People's Republic of China's rule in Tibet.
During the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the 14th Dalai Lama and some of his government fled to India.

Hui people

HuiChinese MuslimHui Muslim
The PLA used Hui soldiers, who formerly had served under Ma Bufang to crush the Tibetan revolt in Amdo.
The PLA used Hui soldiers, who formally had served under Ma Bufang, as well as Salafi soldiers, to crush the Tibetan revolt in Amdo during the 1959 Tibetan uprising.

Anti-communism

anti-communistanticommunistanti-communists
The Mongolian and Tibetan Affairs Commission sent secret agents to India to disseminate pro-Kuomintang (KMT) and anti-Communist propaganda among Tibetan exiles.
The 1959 Tibetan Rebellion had some anti-communist leanings.

History of Tibet (1950–present)

Tibet since 1950modern Tibetan historyOccupation of Tibet
In 1959 the 14th Dalai Lama fled Tibet to northern India under cover where he established the Central Tibetan Administration.

Dharamshala

DharamsalaDharmsalaDharmasala
Released in 1992, he escaped to Dharamsala in India, home of the Tibetan government in exile and became an internationally acclaimed activist for the Tibetan cause.
Following the 1959 Tibetan uprising there was an influx of Tibetan refugees who followed the 14th Dalai Lama.

Protests and uprisings in Tibet since 1950

Tibetan resistance movementTibetan Resistance Since 1950Tibetan resistance
The CIA officer, Bruce Walker, who oversaw the operations of CIA-trained Tibetan agents, was troubled by the hostility from the Tibetans towards his agents: "the radio teams were experiencing major resistance from the population inside Tibet."
Protests and uprisings in Tibet against the government of the People's Republic of China have occurred since 1950, and include the 1959 uprising, the 2008 uprising, and the subsequent self-immolation protests.

Incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China

Chinese invasion of Tibetincorporatedoccupation of Tibet
The Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structure remained in place in the Tibet Autonomous Region under the authority of China until the 1959 Tibetan uprising, when the Dalai Lama fled into exile and after which the Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structures were dissolved.

Palden Gyatso

Buddhist monk Palden Gyatso was arrested in June, 1959 by Chinese officials for demonstrating during the March uprising.
Palden Gyatso was arrested in June 1959 by Chinese officials for demonstrating during the 10 March 1959 Tibetan uprising.

Tibet

TibetanGreater TibetThibet
However, after a tour through Tibet, he wrote a document in May 1962 known as the 70,000 Character Petition addressed to Zhou Enlai criticizing Chinese abuses in Tibet, and met with Zhou to discuss it.
After the Dalai Lama's government fled to Dharamsala, India, during the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion, it established a rival government-in-exile.

Ganden Monastery

GandenGadenGanden Shartse Monastery
Lhasa's three major monasteries—Sera, Ganden, and Drepung—were seriously damaged by shelling, with Sera and Drepung being damaged nearly beyond repair.
Ganden Monastery was completely destroyed by the People's Liberation Army during the 1959 Tibetan uprising.

1987–89 Tibetan unrest

1987–1989 Tibetan unrest1989 Tibetan unrest1987-1989 protests
The largest demonstrations began on March 5, 1989 in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, when a group of monks, nuns, and laypeople took to the streets as the 30th anniversary of the 1959 Tibetan uprising approached.

70,000 Character Petition

However, after a tour through Tibet, he wrote a document in May 1962 known as the 70,000 Character Petition addressed to Zhou Enlai criticizing Chinese abuses in Tibet, and met with Zhou to discuss it.
During a commemoration in 1999 of the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the Dalai Lama declared that "the 70,000 Character petition published in 1962 by the former Panchen Lama constitutes an eloquent historical document on the policies carried out by the Chinese in Tibet and on the draconian measures put in place there."

Tibet Area (administrative division)

Tibet AreaTibetArea
Following the 1959 Tibetan rebellion, the State Council of the PRC ordered to replace the Kashag government with the "Preparatory Committee for the Tibet Autonomous Region" which was established in 1956.

Ganden Phodrang

Ganden PodrangTibetTibetan Government
It remained the chief residence of the Dalai Lama until the 14th Dalai Lama fled to India during the 1959 Tibetan uprising.

Sinicization of Tibet

Chinese cultural hegemonyCultural genocide in Tibetenormous influx of Chinese settlers

Tsarong

Tsarong DzasaKungo TsarongTsarong Dazang Dramdul
In 1959 a revolt broke out in Lhasa against the Chinese government.

Seventeen Point Agreement

Seventeen Point Agreement for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet17-point agreementSeventeen-Point Agreement
The 1959 Tibetan uprising or the 1959 Tibetan rebellion began on 10 March 1959, when a revolt erupted in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region, which had been under the effective control of the People's Republic of China since the Seventeen Point Agreement was reached in 1951. In 1951, an agreement between the People's Republic of China and representatives of the Dalai Lama was put into effect.

Chushi Gangdruk

dissidentsTibetan guerillasChushi Gangdrug
Armed conflict between Tibetan guerillas and the People's Liberation Army (PLA) had started in 1956 in the Kham and Amdo regions, which had been subjected to socialist reform.