1964 United Kingdom general election

19641964 general election1964 electiongeneral electionOctober 1964 general election1964 UK general election1964 general electionsgeneral election in October 1964general election of 1964United Kingdom general election
The 1964 United Kingdom general election was held on 15 October 1964, five years after the previous election, and thirteen years after the Conservative Party, first led by Winston Churchill, had entered power.wikipedia
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Harold Wilson

Wilsonwhite heat of technologySir Harold Wilson
It resulted in the Conservatives, now led by its fourth leader, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, narrowly losing the election to the Labour Party, led by Harold Wilson, with Labour having an overall majority of four seats. Both major parties had changed leadership in 1963; after the sudden death of Hugh Gaitskell early in the year, Labour chose Harold Wilson (who was then thought of as being on the party's centre-left), while Sir Alec Douglas-Home (then the Earl of Home) had taken over as Conservative leader and Prime Minister in the autumn after Harold Macmillan announced his resignation.
Narrowly winning the 1964 general election, Wilson won an increased majority in a snap 1966 election.

Winston Churchill

ChurchillSir Winston ChurchillChurchill, Winston
The 1964 United Kingdom general election was held on 15 October 1964, five years after the previous election, and thirteen years after the Conservative Party, first led by Winston Churchill, had entered power.
In declining health, Churchill resigned as prime minister in 1955, although he remained an MP until 1964.

1966 United Kingdom general election

19661966 general election1966 election
This proved to be unworkable, and Wilson called a snap election in 1966.
Wilson's decision to call a snap election turned on the fact that his government, elected a mere 17 months previously in 1964, had an unworkably small majority of only 4 MPs.

Profumo affair

Profumo scandalProfumosex scandal
Despite initial popularity and a resounding election victory in 1959, he had become increasingly unpopular in the early-1960s, and while it was for a while thought likely that the Conservatives would win the scheduled 1964 general election, albeit with a reduced majority, the emergence of the Profumo affair in March 1963 and Macmillan's handling of the matter all but destroyed the credibility of his government.
His Conservative Party was marked by the scandal, which may have contributed to its defeat by the Labour Party in the 1964 general election.

Alec Douglas-Home

Sir Alec Douglas-HomeLord HomeThe Earl of Home
It resulted in the Conservatives, now led by its fourth leader, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, narrowly losing the election to the Labour Party, led by Harold Wilson, with Labour having an overall majority of four seats. Both major parties had changed leadership in 1963; after the sudden death of Hugh Gaitskell early in the year, Labour chose Harold Wilson (who was then thought of as being on the party's centre-left), while Sir Alec Douglas-Home (then the Earl of Home) had taken over as Conservative leader and Prime Minister in the autumn after Harold Macmillan announced his resignation.
After narrow defeat in the general election of 1964, Home resigned the party leadership in July 1965, having instituted a new and less secretive method of electing the leader.

Scottish Liberal Party

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The party reached its low point during the 1950s, when Jo Grimond was the sole Scottish Liberal MP in the House of Commons, but it gained a partial revival in the 1964 general election when it gained three further MPs, George Mackie, Russell Johnston and Alasdair Mackenzie.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
The Labour Party returned to government with a 4-seat majority under Wilson in the 1964 general election but increased its majority to 96 in the 1966 general election.

George Brown, Baron George-Brown

George BrownLord George-Brown The Right Honourable '''George Brown
While George Brown, deputy leader of the Labour Party, toured the country making energetic speeches (and the occasional gaffe), Quintin Hogg was a leading spokesman for the Conservatives.
He retained the deputy leadership and despite his personal differences, played an important part in advising Wilson about Labour's campaign strategy in the 1964 general election.

Desmond Donnelly

In particular the small majority meant the government could not implement its policy of nationalising the steel industry, due to the opposition of two of its backbenchers, Woodrow Wyatt and Desmond Donnelly.
This ensured his appointment as political correspondent for the Daily Herald from 1959, but Gaitskell's death in 1963 brought in Harold Wilson with whom Donnelly was not pleased; although his skills would have merited appointment to Wilson's government after the 1964 election, Wilson offered Donnelly nothing.

Unionist Party (Scotland)

UnionistUnionist PartyScottish Unionist Party
Following electoral defeat when the Party lost 6 seats in the United Kingdom general election, 1964, reforms in 1965 brought an end to the Scottish Unionist Party as an independent force.

West Dunbartonshire (UK Parliament constituency)

West DunbartonshireDunbartonshire WestWest Dunbartonshire CC
The results of the First Periodical Review of the Boundary Commission were implemented for the 1955 general election, but there was no change to the boundaries of West Dunbartonshire, and the boundaries of 1951 and 1955 were used also in the general elections of 1959, 1964, 1966 and 1970.

Harold Macmillan

MacmillanHarold Macmillan, 1st Earl of StocktonMacmillan Government
Both major parties had changed leadership in 1963; after the sudden death of Hugh Gaitskell early in the year, Labour chose Harold Wilson (who was then thought of as being on the party's centre-left), while Sir Alec Douglas-Home (then the Earl of Home) had taken over as Conservative leader and Prime Minister in the autumn after Harold Macmillan announced his resignation.
Macmillan initially refused a peerage and retired from politics in September 1964, a month before the 1964 election, which the Conservatives narrowly lost to Labour, now led by Harold Wilson.

East Dunbartonshire (UK Parliament constituency)

East DunbartonshireDunbartonshire EastEast Dunbartonshire CC
The results of the First Periodical Review of the Boundary Commission were implemented for the 1955 general election, but there was no change to the boundaries of East Dunbartonshire, and the boundaries of 1951 and 1955 were used also in the general elections of 1959, 1964, 1966 and 1970.

Aberdeen North (UK Parliament constituency)

Aberdeen NorthAberdeen North BCAberdeen, North
The same boundaries were used for the 1959 general election, the 1964 general election, the 1966 general election and the 1970 general election.

Hugh Gaitskell

GaitskellMr GaitskellThe Right Honourable '''Hugh Gaitskell''' CBE
Both major parties had changed leadership in 1963; after the sudden death of Hugh Gaitskell early in the year, Labour chose Harold Wilson (who was then thought of as being on the party's centre-left), while Sir Alec Douglas-Home (then the Earl of Home) had taken over as Conservative leader and Prime Minister in the autumn after Harold Macmillan announced his resignation.
His death left an opening for Harold Wilson in the party leadership; Wilson narrowly won the next general election for Labour 21 months later.

Edinburgh Leith (UK Parliament constituency)

Edinburgh LeithEdinburgh Leith BCEdinburgh, Leith
For the county of Midlothian, inclusive of the city of Edinburgh, the general pattern established by the First Periodical Review was maintained for the general elections of 1959, 1964, 1966, 1970, February 1974, October 1974 and 1979.

Daily Express

Sunday ExpressExpressThe Daily Express
Daily Express: Lab swing of 1.75% (Con majority of 60)

Snap election

snapsnap general electionsnap elections
This proved to be unworkable, and Wilson called a snap election in 1966.
1966 general election: Harold Wilson called the election seventeen months after Labour narrowly won the 1964 general election: The government had won a barely-workable majority of four seats, which had been reduced to two after the Leyton by-election in January 1965. Labour won a decisive victory, with a majority of 98 seats.