1964 United States presidential election

President and Mrs. Kennedy, moments before his assassination
First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Results by congressional district.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Governor George Wallace of Alabama
Senator Hiram Fong from Hawaii
Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania
Senator Margaret Chase Smith from Maine
Representative John W. Byrnes from Wisconsin
U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., from Massachusetts
Governor Jim Rhodes of Ohio
Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York
Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Presidential election results by county
Democratic presidential election results by county
Republican presidential election results by county
Unpledged electors presidential election results by county
"Other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of unpledged electors presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "Other" presidential election results by county

The 45th quadrennial presidential election.

- 1964 United States presidential election

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Official portrait, 1965

Hubert Humphrey

American pharmacist and politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969.

American pharmacist and politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969.

Official portrait, 1965
Humphrey working as a pharmacist in his father's pharmacy.
Humphrey at the 1948 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
Senator Humphrey
In the 1960 primaries, Humphrey won South Dakota and Washington, D.C.
Vice President-elect Humphrey alongside Coretta Scott King and Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Humphrey (right) with President Johnson (left) horse-riding in LBJ ranch on November 4, 1964.
Vice President Humphrey at a meeting in the Oval Office, June 21, 1965
Humphrey with Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin and Gemini 4 astronauts at the 1965 Paris Air Show
Vice President Hubert Humphrey, President Lyndon Johnson, and General Creighton Abrams in a Cabinet Room meeting in March 1968
Hubert Humphrey campaigning for President in 1968
Senator Hubert Humphrey with Democratic presidential nominee Jimmy Carter, in 1976. California Governor Jerry Brown is at right.
1972 campaign logo
Senator Hubert Humphrey with President Jimmy Carter aboard Air Force One in 1977
Burial plot of Hubert and Muriel Humphrey at Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis

After Lyndon B. Johnson acceded to the presidency, he chose Humphrey as his running mate, and the Democratic ticket won a landslide victory in the 1964 election.

President Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and Texas governor John Connally with his wife, Nellie, in the presidential limousine, minutes before the assassination. Secret Service agents William Greer (driving) and Roy Kellerman are in the front seats.

Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. CST in Dallas, Texas, while riding in a presidential motorcade through Dealey Plaza.

Assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. CST in Dallas, Texas, while riding in a presidential motorcade through Dealey Plaza.

President Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and Texas governor John Connally with his wife, Nellie, in the presidential limousine, minutes before the assassination. Secret Service agents William Greer (driving) and Roy Kellerman are in the front seats.
Dealey Plaza showing the route of Kennedy's motorcade. In the overhead view north is at left.
President Kennedy's motorcade on Main Street, approaching Dealey Plaza
Dealey Plaza, with Elm Street on the right and the Triple Underpass in the middle. The white concrete pergola, from which Zapruder was filming, is at the right, and the Grassy Knoll is in front of it (slightly left of it in the picture). The red brick building partially visible at the upper right is the Texas School Book Depository. Kennedy was struck by the final bullet when he was just left of the lamp-post in front of the pergola.
Bill and Gayle Newman dropped to the grass and shielded their children.
Jack Ruby shooting Oswald, who was being escorted by police detective Jim Leavelle (tan suit) for the transfer from the city jail to the county jail.
Cecil Stoughton's iconic photograph of Lyndon B. Johnson being sworn in as President as Air Force One prepares to depart Love Field in Dallas. Jacqueline Kennedy (right), still in her blood-spattered clothes (not visible here), looks on.
The Bell & Howell Zoomatic movie camera used by Abraham Zapruder to shoot footage of the motorcade, which later came to be known as the Zapruder film. The camera is preserved within the collection of the U.S. National Archives.
The Warren Commission presents its report to President Johnson. From left to right: John McCloy, J. Lee Rankin (General Counsel), Senator Richard Russell, Congressman Gerald Ford, Chief Justice Earl Warren, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Allen Dulles, Senator John Sherman Cooper, and Congressman Hale Boggs.
The wooden fence on the grassy knoll, where many conspiracy theorists believe another gunman stood
Dealey Plaza and Texas School Book Depository in 1969, six years after the assassination
Plaque on the Texas School Book Depository building
Looking southeast across Elm St. in 2006, with the pergola and knoll behind the photographer: The white 'X' marks the point at which Kennedy was struck in the head.

2) To begin his quest for reelection in November 1964; and

Pens used by President Lyndon B. Johnson to sign Great Society legislation

Great Society

Set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65.

Set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65.

Pens used by President Lyndon B. Johnson to sign Great Society legislation
President Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965
The August 1964 signing of the Poverty Bill
President Johnson signs the Social Security Act of 1965.

With the exception of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Great Society agenda was not a widely discussed issue during the 1964 presidential election campaign.

Senate portrait, 1960

Barry Goldwater

Senate portrait, 1960
Major General Barry M. Goldwater in his United States Air Force uniform
Major General Barry M. Goldwater in his office at Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. in January 1967
Major General Barry M. Goldwater piloting a Convair F-102 Delta Dagger in 1967
President Lyndon B. Johnson with Senator Goldwater, January 16, 1964
Ronald Reagan speaks for presidential candidate Goldwater in Los Angeles, 1964
Presidential election results by state
Goldwater meets with President Ronald Reagan in the oval office, 1984
President Ronald Reagan and Senator Goldwater award retired General Jimmy Doolittle, USAFR, with a fourth star, April 10, 1985
Informal press conference August 7, 1974 (one day before Nixon announced his resignation) following a meeting between Goldwater, Senate Minority Leader Scott, House Minority Leader Rhodes and the President to discuss the Watergate scandal and impeachment process
Signing autographs at the Fiesta Bowl parade in 1983
Most of the kachina dolls at the Heard Museum were donated by Goldwater
The Goldwater Crypt#64
Barry M. Goldwater Terminal 4 entrance at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
Barry Goldwater statue in National Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.
The Barry Goldwater Memorial Park

Barry Morris Goldwater (January 2, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was an American politician and United States Air Force officer who was a five-term Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–1987) and the Republican Party nominee for president of the United States in 1964.

1980 United States presidential election

The 49th quadrennial presidential election.

The 49th quadrennial presidential election.

Ronald Reagan campaigning with his wife Nancy and Senator Strom Thurmond in Columbia, South Carolina, October 10, 1980
Ronald Reagan campaigning in Florida
Ronald Reagan shaking hands with supporters at a campaign stop in Indiana
President Carter (left) and former Governor Reagan (right) at the presidential debate on October 28, 1980
Election results by county
Results by congressional district
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote

Due to the rise of conservatism following Reagan's victory, some historians consider the election to be a political realignment that began with Barry Goldwater's presidential campaign in 1964, and the 1980 election marked the start of the Reagan Era.

Candidate placards in New Hampshire, 2013

Campaign advertising

Use of an advertising campaign through the media to influence a political debate, and ultimately, voters.

Use of an advertising campaign through the media to influence a political debate, and ultimately, voters.

Candidate placards in New Hampshire, 2013
Political advertising truck in India, 2014
Advertisement from the 2013 Chilean general election for Michelle Bachelet
Advert for the Liberal Party of Australia, 2010
President Reagan giving Campaign speech in Austin, Texas, 1984

In the 1964 United States presidential election, aggressive advertising paved the way for a landslide victory for Lyndon B. Johnson.

Oval Office photo, 1964

Lyndon B. Johnson

American politician who served as the 36th president of the United States from 1963 to 1969.

American politician who served as the 36th president of the United States from 1963 to 1969.

Oval Office photo, 1964
Seven-year-old Johnson with his trademark cowboy hat, c. 1915.
Johnson's boyhood home in Johnson City, Texas
President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Governor James V. Allred of Texas, and Johnson, 1937. Johnson later used an edited version of this photo, with Allred airbrushed out, in his 1941 senatorial campaign.
LCDR Johnson, March 1942
Johnson as U.S. senator from Texas
Senate Desk X, used by all Democratic leaders, including Johnson, since Joseph Taylor Robinson
Johnson giving "The Treatment" to Senator Richard Russell in 1963, shortly after becoming president.
President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson outside the White House prior to a ceremony
Vice President Johnson and Attorney General Robert Kennedy meeting with civil rights leaders at the White House on June 22, 1963.
Opening Day of the 1961 baseball season. President Kennedy throws out the first ball at Griffith Stadium, the home field of the Washington Senators, as LBJ and Hubert Humphrey look on.
Vice President Johnson visiting Finland in September 1963; here seen with Mrs. Johnson, while Urho Kekkonen, the President of Finland, welcomes them.
LBJ is sworn in on Air Force One by Judge Sarah Hughes as Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Kennedy look on.
Meeting with civil rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr. (left), Whitney Young, and James Farmer in the Oval Office in 1964
President Lyndon Johnson (left), alongside Illinois AFL-CIO President Reuben Soderstrom (center) and Vice President Stanley Johnson (right), speaks to the delegates of the 1964 Illinois AFL-CIO convention.
1964 presidential election results
President Lyndon B. Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks at the signing of the Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1965
President Johnson signs the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 as Sen. Edward Kennedy, Sen. Robert Kennedy, and others look on
Former president Truman and wife Bess at Medicare Bill signing in 1965, as Lady Bird and Hubert Humphrey look on
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson (center left) and Vice President Spiro Agnew (center right) witness the liftoff of Apollo 11.
Aftermath from a race riot in Washington D.C., April 1968
Lady Bird Johnson and LBJ with Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos on September 12, 1966
Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and Queen Farah Pahlavi with the Johnsons on their visit to the United States
Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara and General Westmoreland in Vietnam 1965
Awarding a medal to a U.S. soldier during a visit to Vietnam in 1966
Philippines President Marcos hosting the leaders of SEATO nations during the Manila Conference on the Vietnam War
Johnson greeting a crowd, 1966
Johnson talking with his Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, 1967
Vietnam War protestors march at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. on October 21, 1967. Support for the war was dropping and the anti-Vietnam War movement strengthened.
Walt Whitman Rostow shows President Lyndon B. Johnson a model of the Khe Sanh area in February 1968
Tens of thousands of civilians were killed during the American bombing of North Vietnam in Operation Rolling Thunder.
Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin (left) next to Johnson during the Glassboro Summit Conference
Countries visited by Johnson during his presidency
President Johnson meets with Republican candidate Richard Nixon in the White House, July 1968.
Johnson in the Oval Office in 1969, a few days before Richard Nixon's inauguration
With the appointment of Thurgood Marshall, Johnson placed the first African American on the Supreme Court.
Johnson with longer hair during an interview in August 1972, five months before his death
Johnson wearing a cowboy hat at his ranch in Texas, 1972
Johnson's grave
Johnson lying in state in the United States Capitol rotunda
Johnson's image as it appears in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.
Johnson with his family in the Yellow Oval Room, Christmas 1968
Front view of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum located on the campus of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas
Entrance to the Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

Johnson received 61.1% of the popular vote in the 1964 presidential election; this makes his victory the largest share of the popular vote of any candidate since James Monroe's victory in 1820.

2008 United States presidential election

The 56th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008.

The 56th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008.

The incumbent in 2008, George W. Bush. His second term expired at noon on January 20, 2009.
2008 DNC during Stevie Wonder's performance
The Palins and McCains campaigning in Fairfax, Virginia, September 10, 2008, following the Republican National Convention
Obama campaigning as a symbol of change in Cleveland, Ohio with a "Change We Need" sign
Cartogram of the Electoral Votes for 2008 United States presidential election, each square representing one electoral vote. The map shows the impact of winning swing states. Nebraska, being one of two states that are not winner-take-all, for the first time had its votes split, with its second congressional district voting for Obama.
An Obama sign displayed at a home in Arlington, VA, on November 1, 2008.
States/districts in the 2008 United States Presidential election in which the margin of victory was less than 5%. Blue states/districts went for Obama, red for McCain. Yellow states were won by either candidate by 5% or more. Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico, Virginia and Iowa were won by Bush in 2004 but were won by Obama by a margin of more than 5% in 2008.
Swing by state. States are listed by (increasing) percentage of Democratic votes, showing how the share of the vote changed between 2004 and 2008. Excluding the candidates' home states, only five states trended more Republican: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and West Virginia.
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{{center|Constitution Party:
{{center|Green Party:
Popular vote by county. Red represents counties that went for McCain; blue represents counties that went for Obama. Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont had all counties go to Obama. Oklahoma had all counties go to McCain.
Presidential popular votes by county as a scale from red/Republican to blue/Democratic.
Cartogram of popular vote with each county rescaled in proportion to its population. Deeper blue represents a Democratic majority; brighter red represents a Republican majority.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mejn/election/2008/|title=Election maps|website=www-personal.umich.edu}}</ref>
Voting shifts per county from the 2004 to the 2008 election. Darker blue indicates the county voted more Democratic. Darker red indicates the county voted more Republican.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Change in vote margins at the county level from the 2004 election to the 2008 election. Obama made dramatic gains in every region of the country except for Arizona (McCain's home state), Alaska (Palin's home state), Appalachia, and the inner South, where McCain improved over Bush.
Results by Congressional Districts, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.

Obama received the largest share of the popular vote won by a Democrat since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and was the first Democrat to win an outright majority of the popular vote since Jimmy Carter in 1976.

Deep South

Cultural and geographic subregion in the Southern United States.

Cultural and geographic subregion in the Southern United States.

Approximate geographic definition of the Deep South and neighboring regions in the greater Southern United States. The Deep South is consistently thought to include most or all of the states shown in red and overlaps into portions of those in orange. While the Census Bureau considers those in yellow to be part of the South, they are not typically attached to the Deep South geographic label. The inner core of the region, characterized by very rich black soil that supported cotton plantations, is known as the Black Belt (geological formation). The Black Belt in the American South has since become better known as a sociocultural region.
Southern Black Belt counties with an African-American population of 30% or higher in 2000
2000 Census Population Ancestry Map, with African-American ancestry in purple.

Beginning with the Goldwater–Johnson election of 1964, a significant contingent of white conservative voters in the Deep South stopped supporting national Democratic Party candidates and switched to the Republican Party.

The Twenty-third Amendment in the National Archives

Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Twenty-third Amendment (Amendment XXIII) to the United States Constitution extends the right to participate in presidential elections to the District of Columbia.

The Twenty-third Amendment (Amendment XXIII) to the United States Constitution extends the right to participate in presidential elections to the District of Columbia.

The Twenty-third Amendment in the National Archives

The first presidential election in which the District of Columbia participated was the election of 1964.