1964 United States presidential election

19641964 presidential election1964 election1964 presidential campaign1964 U.S. presidential electionelection of 1964presidential election of 1964Presidentpresidential election1964 Democratic presidential primaries
The 1964 United States presidential election was the 45th quadrennial American presidential election.wikipedia
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Barry Goldwater

Barry M. GoldwaterGoldwaterBarry Morris Goldwater
Incumbent Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson defeated Barry Goldwater, the Republican nominee.
Despite his loss of the 1964 presidential election in a landslide, Goldwater is the politician most often credited with having sparked the resurgence of the American conservative political movement in the 1960s.

1964 Democratic Party presidential primaries

1964 Democratic presidential primariesDemocratic Party presidential primaries, 19641964 Democratic presidential primary election
He easily defeated a primary challenge by segregationist Governor George Wallace of Alabama to win nomination to a full term.
The 1964 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1964 U.S. presidential election.

Daisy (advertisement)

DaisyDaisy adDaisy Girl
Democrats successfully portrayed Goldwater as a dangerous extremist, most famously in the "Daisy" television advertisement.
"Daisy", sometimes known as "Daisy Girl" or "Peace, Little Girl", was a controversial political advertisement aired on television during the 1964 United States presidential election by incumbent president Lyndon B. Johnson's campaign.

Hubert Humphrey

Hubert H. HumphreyHumphreyHubert Horatio Humphrey
At the 1964 Democratic National Convention, Johnson also won the nomination of his preferred running mate, Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota.
After Lyndon B. Johnson acceded to the presidency, he chose Humphrey as his running mate, and the Democratic ticket was elected in the landslide 1964 election.

Ronald Reagan

ReaganRonald W. ReaganPresident Reagan
The long-term realignment of conservatives to the Republican Party continued, culminating in the 1980 presidential victory of Ronald Reagan.
In 1964, Reagan's speech "A Time for Choosing" supported Barry Goldwater's foundering presidential campaign and earned him national attention as a new conservative spokesman.

1964 United States elections

United States elections, 196419641964 elections
Johnson's landslide victory coincided with the defeat of many conservative Republican Congressmen.
The 1964 United States Elections were held on November 3, and elected the members of the 89th United States Congress, as well as the 45th Presidential Election.

Great Society

National Data BankThe Great SocietyCivil Rights Act
Johnson championed his passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and his campaign advocated a series of anti-poverty programs collectively known as the Great Society.
With the exception of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Great Society agenda was not a widely discussed issue during the 1964 presidential election campaign.

Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution

Twenty-third Amendment23rd Amendment23rd Amendment to the United States Constitution
Johnson carried 44 states and the District of Columbia, which voted for the first time in this election.
The first presidential election in which the District of Columbia participated was the election of 1964; starting with that election, the District of Columbia has consistently had three members of the Electoral College.

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon JohnsonJohnsonLyndon Baines Johnson
Incumbent Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson defeated Barry Goldwater, the Republican nominee.
The following year, Johnson won in a landslide, defeating Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

Civil Rights ActTitle VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964Title VII
Johnson championed his passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and his campaign advocated a series of anti-poverty programs collectively known as the Great Society.
Johnson, however, went on to win the 1964 election by one of the biggest landslides in American history.

Margaret Chase Smith

Margaret C. SmithMargaret SmithMargaret Chase
Smith was a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 1964 presidential election; she was the first woman to be placed in nomination for the presidency at a major party's convention.

Nelson Rockefeller

Nelson A. RockefellerNelson Aldrich RockefellerNelson
Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, a leader of his party's conservative faction, defeated moderate Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York and Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania at the 1964 Republican National Convention. Governors Nelson Rockefeller of New York and George Romney of Michigan refused to endorse Goldwater and did not campaign for him.
After unsuccessfully seeking the Republican presidential nomination in 1960, 1964 and 1968, Rockefeller was appointed vice president of the United States under President Gerald R. Ford, who ascended to the presidency following the August 1974 resignation of Richard Nixon.

William Scranton

William W. ScrantonBill ScrantonWilliam Warren Scranton
Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, a leader of his party's conservative faction, defeated moderate Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York and Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania at the 1964 Republican National Convention.
Scranton entered the race for the 1964 Republican presidential nomination after the collapse of Nelson Rockefeller's candidacy, but Barry Goldwater won the nomination.

William E. Miller

MillerWilliam Miller1964
The vice-presidential nomination went to little-known Republican Party Chairman William E. Miller, a Representative from upstate New York.
He was the Republican Party nominee for Vice President of the United States in the 1964 election.

George W. Romney

George RomneyRomneyGeorge
Governors Nelson Rockefeller of New York and George Romney of Michigan refused to endorse Goldwater and did not campaign for him.
He briefly represented moderate Republicans against conservative Republican Barry Goldwater during the 1964 U.S. presidential election.

Arizona

AZState of ArizonaArizona, U.S.
Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, a leader of his party's conservative faction, defeated moderate Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York and Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania at the 1964 Republican National Convention.
Democrat Lyndon Johnson, in 1964, lost the state by less than 5,000 votes to Arizona Senator and native Barry Goldwater.

1980 United States presidential election

19801980 presidential election1980 election
The long-term realignment of conservatives to the Republican Party continued, culminating in the 1980 presidential victory of Ronald Reagan.
While during Barry Goldwater's 1964 campaign, many voters saw his warnings about a too-powerful government as hyperbolic and only 30% of the electorate agreed that government was too powerful, by 1980 a majority of Americans believed that government held too much power.

Richard Nixon

Richard M. NixonNixonPresident Nixon
Former Vice-President Richard Nixon, who had been beaten by Kennedy in the extremely close 1960 presidential election, decided not to run.
The election was a disaster for the Republicans; Goldwater's landslide loss to Johnson was matched by heavy losses for the party in Congress and among state governors.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
The 1964 United States presidential election was the 45th quadrennial American presidential election.

Deep South

SouthLower SouthSouthern
Goldwater won his home state and swept the states of the Deep South, most of which had not voted for a Republican presidential candidate since the end of Reconstruction in 1877.
Beginning with the Goldwater–Johnson election of 1964, a significant contingent of white conservative voters in the Deep South stopped supporting national Democratic Party candidates and switched to Republicans.

Harold Stassen

Harold E. StassenStassenStassen, Harold
Stassen was later best known for being a perennial candidate for the Republican Party nomination for President of the United States, seeking it nine times between 1944 and 1992 (1944, 1948, 1952, 1964, 1968, 1980, 1984, 1988, and 1992).

A Time for Choosing

Time for choosing
Many historians consider this speech—"A Time for Choosing"—to mark the beginning of Reagan's transformation from an actor to a political leader.
"A Time for Choosing", also known as "The Speech", was a speech presented during the 1964 U.S. presidential election campaign by future president Ronald Reagan on behalf of Republican candidate Barry Goldwater.

Solid South

solidly Democratic Southwas a givena Democratic bastion
The 1964 election was a major transition point for the South, and an important step in the process by which the Democrats' former "Solid South" became a Republican bastion.
The Southern bloc existed especially between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964.

1964 Democratic National Convention

1964Democratic National Convention1964 Convention
At the 1964 Democratic National Convention, Johnson also won the nomination of his preferred running mate, Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota.

Confessions of a Republican

Confessions of a Republican, another Johnson ad, features a monologue from a man who tells us that he had previously voted for Eisenhower and Nixon, but now worries about the "men with strange ideas", "weird groups" and "the head of the Ku Klux Klan" who were supporting Goldwater; he concludes that "either they're not Republicans, or I'm not".
Confessions of a Republican was a political advertisement aired on television during the 1964 United States presidential election by incumbent president Lyndon B. Johnson's campaign.