The incumbent in 2008, George W. Bush. His second term expired at noon on January 20, 2009.
President and Mrs. Kennedy, moments before his assassination
First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
2008 DNC during Stevie Wonder's performance
Results by congressional district.
The Palins and McCains campaigning in Fairfax, Virginia, September 10, 2008, following the Republican National Convention
Obama campaigning as a symbol of change in Cleveland, Ohio with a "Change We Need" sign
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Cartogram of the Electoral Votes for 2008 United States presidential election, each square representing one electoral vote. The map shows the impact of winning swing states. Nebraska, being one of two states that are not winner-take-all, for the first time had its votes split, with its second congressional district voting for Obama.
Governor George Wallace of Alabama
An Obama sign displayed at a home in Arlington, VA, on November 1, 2008.
Senator Hiram Fong from Hawaii
States/districts in the 2008 United States Presidential election in which the margin of victory was less than 5%. Blue states/districts went for Obama, red for McCain. Yellow states were won by either candidate by 5% or more. Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico, Virginia and Iowa were won by Bush in 2004 but were won by Obama by a margin of more than 5% in 2008.
Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania
Swing by state. States are listed by (increasing) percentage of Democratic votes, showing how the share of the vote changed between 2004 and 2008. Excluding the candidates' home states, only five states trended more Republican: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and West Virginia.
Senator Margaret Chase Smith from Maine
{{center|Independent:
Representative John W. Byrnes from Wisconsin
{{center|Libertarian Party:
U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., from Massachusetts
{{center|Constitution Party:
Governor Jim Rhodes of Ohio
{{center|Green Party:
Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York
Popular vote by county. Red represents counties that went for McCain; blue represents counties that went for Obama. Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont had all counties go to Obama. Oklahoma had all counties go to McCain.
Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota
Presidential popular votes by county as a scale from red/Republican to blue/Democratic.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Cartogram of popular vote with each county rescaled in proportion to its population. Deeper blue represents a Democratic majority; brighter red represents a Republican majority.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mejn/election/2008/|title=Election maps|website=www-personal.umich.edu}}</ref>
Presidential election results by county
Voting shifts per county from the 2004 to the 2008 election. Darker blue indicates the county voted more Democratic. Darker red indicates the county voted more Republican.
Democratic presidential election results by county
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Republican presidential election results by county
Change in vote margins at the county level from the 2004 election to the 2008 election. Obama made dramatic gains in every region of the country except for Arizona (McCain's home state), Alaska (Palin's home state), Appalachia, and the inner South, where McCain improved over Bush.
Unpledged electors presidential election results by county
Results by Congressional Districts, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
"Other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of unpledged electors presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "Other" presidential election results by county

Obama received the largest share of the popular vote won by a Democrat since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and was the first Democrat to win an outright majority of the popular vote since Jimmy Carter in 1976.

- 2008 United States presidential election

Iowa and Oregon would not vote Democratic again until 1988, California, Colorado, Illinois, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, and Vermont would not vote Democratic again until 1992, while Indiana and Virginia would not vote Democratic again until 2008.

- 1964 United States presidential election

3 related topics

Alpha

Alaska

U.S. state located in the Western United States on the northwest extremity of North America.

U.S. state located in the Western United States on the northwest extremity of North America.

A modern Alutiiq dancer in traditional festival garb
The Russian settlement of St. Paul's Harbor (present-day Kodiak town), Kodiak Island, 1814
Miners and prospectors climb the Chilkoot Trail during the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush
U.S. troops navigate snow and ice during the Battle of Attu in May 1943
Alaska's size compared with the 48 contiguous states (Albers equal-area conic projection)
Denali is the highest peak in North America.
Although entirely east of the International Date Line (the triangular kink in the line was agreed upon the US acquisition of Alaska), the Aleutian Islands cross the 180th meridian, such that they contain both the westernmost (Amatignak) and the easternmost (Semisopochnoi) points in the United States
Anchorage, Alaska's largest city
Fairbanks, Alaska's second-largest city and by a significant margin the largest city in Alaska's interior
Juneau, Alaska's third-largest city and its capital
Bethel, the largest city in the Unorganized Borough and in rural Alaska
Homer, showing (from bottom to top) the edge of downtown, its airport and the Spit
Utqiaġvik (Browerville neighborhood near Eben Hopson Middle School shown), known colloquially for many years by the nickname "Top of the World", is the northernmost city in the United States.
Cordova, built in the early 20th century to support the Kennecott Mines and the Copper River and Northwestern Railway, has persevered as a fishing community since their closure.
Main Street in Talkeetna
Alaska has more acreage of public land owned by the federal government than any other state.
Köppen climate types of Alaska
Map of the largest racial/ethnic group by borough. Red indicates Native American, blue indicates non-Hispanic white, and green indicates Asian. Darker shades indicate a higher proportion of the population.
St. Michael's Russian Orthodox Cathedral in downtown Sitka
Gold Rush-era Baptist church in Eagle
Aerial view of infrastructure at the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field
The Trans-Alaska Pipeline transports oil, Alaska's most financially important export, from the North Slope to Valdez. The heat pipes in the column mounts are pertinent, since they disperse heat upwards and prevent melting of permafrost.
Alaska proven oil reserves peaked in 1973 and have declined more than 60% since then
Alaskan oil production peaked in 1988 and has declined more than 75% since then
Halibut, both as a sport fish and commercially, is important to the state's economy.
A dog team in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, arguably the most popular winter event in Alaska
Mask Display at Iñupiat Heritage Center in Utqiaġvik
Films featuring Alaskan wolves usually employ domesticated wolf-dog hybrids to stand in for wild wolves.
The Kachemak Bay Campus of the University of Alaska Anchorage, located in downtown Homer
The Sterling Highway, near its intersection with the Seward Highway
The Susitna River bridge on the Denali Highway is 1036 ft long.
Alaska Interstate Highways
Alaska welcome sign on the Klondike Highway
An Alaska Railroad locomotive over a bridge in Girdwood approaching Anchorage (2007)
The White Pass and Yukon Route traverses rugged terrain north of Skagway near the Canada–US border.
The (named after Tustumena Glacier) is one of the state's many ferries, providing service between the Kenai Peninsula, Kodiak Island and the Aleutian Chain.
A Bombardier Dash 8, operated by Era Alaska, on approach to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport
The center of state government in Juneau. The large buildings in the background are, from left to right: the Court Plaza Building (known colloquially as the "Spam Can"), the State Office Building (behind), the Alaska Office Building, the John H. Dimond State Courthouse, and the Alaska State Capitol. Many of the smaller buildings in the foreground are also occupied by state government agencies.
A line graph showing the presidential vote by party from 1960 to 2016 in Alaska
Mike Dunleavy, Governor
Kevin Meyer, Lieutenant governor
Lisa Murkowski, senior United States senator
Dan Sullivan, junior United States senator
Don Young, U.S. representative (at-large) (Deceased)
Bob Bartlett & Ernest Gruening, Alaska's inaugural U.S. Senators, hold the 49 star U.S. Flag after the admission of Alaska as the 49th state.
Ketchikan, one of the places affected by COVID-19 during the 2020 outbreak in Alaska

Republicans have won the state's electoral college votes in all but one election that it has participated in (1964).

In 2008, Republican John McCain defeated Democrat Barack Obama in Alaska, 59.49% to 37.83%.

Republican Party (United States)

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main historic rival, the Democratic Party.

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main historic rival, the Democratic Party.

Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–1865) and the first Republican to hold the office
Charles R. Jennison, an anti-slavery militia leader associated with the Jayhawkers from Kansas and an early Republican politician in the region
Ulysses S. Grant, 18th president of the United States (1869–1877)
James G. Blaine, 28th & 31st Secretary of State (1881; 1889–1892)
William McKinley, 25th president of the United States (1897–1901)
Theodore Roosevelt, 26th president of the United States (1901–1909)
Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States (1929–1933)
Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States (1981–1989)
Donald Trump, 45th president of the United States (2017–2021)
Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States (1923–1929)
Arnold Schwarzenegger, 38th governor of California (2003–2011)
John McCain, United States senator from Arizona (1987–2018)
Donald Rumsfeld, 21st United States Secretary of Defense (2001–2006)
Colin Powell, 65th United States Secretary of State (2001–2005)
Newt Gingrich, 50th Speaker of the House of Representatives (1995–1999)
Annual population growth in the U.S. by county - 2010s
This map shows the vote in the 2020 presidential election by county.
Political Spectrum Libertarian Left    Centrist   Right  Authoritarian
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

Historians cite the 1964 United States presidential election and its respective 1964 Republican National Convention as a significant shift, which saw the conservative wing, helmed by Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, battle the liberal New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller and his eponymous Rockefeller Republican faction for the party presidential nomination.

In 2008, Republican Senator John McCain of Arizona and Governor Sarah Palin of Alaska were defeated by Democratic Senators Barack Obama and Joe Biden of Illinois and Delaware, respectively.

Nebraska

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

Nebraska in 1718, Guillaume de L'Isle map, with the approximate area of the future state highlighted
Homesteaders in central Nebraska in 1888
A map of Nebraska
Nebraska National Forest
Köppen climate types of Nebraska, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Winter at Scotts Bluff National Monument
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Nebraska grain bins and elevator
A cropduster in agrarian Nebraska, far west of Omaha
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Nebraska State Capitol in Lincoln
Football game at the University of Nebraska on September6, 2008

Republicans have carried the state in all but one presidential election since 1940: the 1964 landslide election of Lyndon B. Johnson.

In 2008, the state split its electoral votes for the first time: Republican John McCain won the popular vote in Nebraska as a whole and two of its three congressional districts; the second district, which includes the city of Omaha, went for Democrat Barack Obama.