Candidate placards in New Hampshire, 2013
Political advertising truck in India, 2014
President and Mrs. Kennedy, moments before his assassination
Advertisement from the 2013 Chilean general election for Michelle Bachelet
First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Advert for the Liberal Party of Australia, 2010
Results by congressional district.
President Reagan giving Campaign speech in Austin, Texas, 1984
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Governor George Wallace of Alabama
Senator Hiram Fong from Hawaii
Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania
Senator Margaret Chase Smith from Maine
Representative John W. Byrnes from Wisconsin
U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., from Massachusetts
Governor Jim Rhodes of Ohio
Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York
Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Presidential election results by county
Democratic presidential election results by county
Republican presidential election results by county
Unpledged electors presidential election results by county
"Other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of unpledged electors presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "Other" presidential election results by county

Democrats successfully portrayed Goldwater as a dangerous extremist, most famously in the "Daisy" television advertisement.

- 1964 United States presidential election

In the 1964 United States presidential election, aggressive advertising paved the way for a landslide victory for Lyndon B. Johnson.

- Campaign advertising

1 related topic

Alpha

Lyndon B. Johnson portrait, taken in December 1963

Daisy (advertisement)

Lyndon B. Johnson portrait, taken in December 1963
Barry Goldwater in September 1962

"Daisy", sometimes referred to as "Daisy Girl" or "Peace, Little Girl", was a controversial political advertisement that aired on television as part of Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 presidential campaign.

Though officially aired only once, it is considered one of the most important factors in Johnson's landslide victory over the Republican Party's candidate, Barry Goldwater, and a turning point in political and advertising history.