Oval Office photo, 1964
Seven-year-old Johnson with his trademark cowboy hat, c. 1915.
Johnson's boyhood home in Johnson City, Texas
President and Mrs. Kennedy, moments before his assassination
President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Governor James V. Allred of Texas, and Johnson, 1937. Johnson later used an edited version of this photo, with Allred airbrushed out, in his 1941 senatorial campaign.
First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
LCDR Johnson, March 1942
Results by congressional district.
Johnson as U.S. senator from Texas
Senate Desk X, used by all Democratic leaders, including Johnson, since Joseph Taylor Robinson
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Johnson giving "The Treatment" to Senator Richard Russell in 1963, shortly after becoming president.
Governor George Wallace of Alabama
President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson outside the White House prior to a ceremony
Senator Hiram Fong from Hawaii
Vice President Johnson and Attorney General Robert Kennedy meeting with civil rights leaders at the White House on June 22, 1963.
Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania
Opening Day of the 1961 baseball season. President Kennedy throws out the first ball at Griffith Stadium, the home field of the Washington Senators, as LBJ and Hubert Humphrey look on.
Senator Margaret Chase Smith from Maine
Vice President Johnson visiting Finland in September 1963; here seen with Mrs. Johnson, while Urho Kekkonen, the President of Finland, welcomes them.
Representative John W. Byrnes from Wisconsin
LBJ is sworn in on Air Force One by Judge Sarah Hughes as Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Kennedy look on.
U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., from Massachusetts
Meeting with civil rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr. (left), Whitney Young, and James Farmer in the Oval Office in 1964
Governor Jim Rhodes of Ohio
President Lyndon Johnson (left), alongside Illinois AFL-CIO President Reuben Soderstrom (center) and Vice President Stanley Johnson (right), speaks to the delegates of the 1964 Illinois AFL-CIO convention.
Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York
1964 presidential election results
Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota
President Lyndon B. Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks at the signing of the Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1965
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
President Johnson signs the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 as Sen. Edward Kennedy, Sen. Robert Kennedy, and others look on
Presidential election results by county
Former president Truman and wife Bess at Medicare Bill signing in 1965, as Lady Bird and Hubert Humphrey look on
Democratic presidential election results by county
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson (center left) and Vice President Spiro Agnew (center right) witness the liftoff of Apollo 11.
Republican presidential election results by county
Aftermath from a race riot in Washington D.C., April 1968
Unpledged electors presidential election results by county
Lady Bird Johnson and LBJ with Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos on September 12, 1966
"Other" presidential election results by county
Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and Queen Farah Pahlavi with the Johnsons on their visit to the United States
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara and General Westmoreland in Vietnam 1965
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Awarding a medal to a U.S. soldier during a visit to Vietnam in 1966
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Philippines President Marcos hosting the leaders of SEATO nations during the Manila Conference on the Vietnam War
Cartogram of unpledged electors presidential election results by county
Johnson greeting a crowd, 1966
Cartogram of "Other" presidential election results by county
Johnson talking with his Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, 1967
Vietnam War protestors march at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. on October 21, 1967. Support for the war was dropping and the anti-Vietnam War movement strengthened.
Walt Whitman Rostow shows President Lyndon B. Johnson a model of the Khe Sanh area in February 1968
Tens of thousands of civilians were killed during the American bombing of North Vietnam in Operation Rolling Thunder.
Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin (left) next to Johnson during the Glassboro Summit Conference
Countries visited by Johnson during his presidency
President Johnson meets with Republican candidate Richard Nixon in the White House, July 1968.
Johnson in the Oval Office in 1969, a few days before Richard Nixon's inauguration
With the appointment of Thurgood Marshall, Johnson placed the first African American on the Supreme Court.
Johnson with longer hair during an interview in August 1972, five months before his death
Johnson wearing a cowboy hat at his ranch in Texas, 1972
Johnson's grave
Johnson lying in state in the United States Capitol rotunda
Johnson's image as it appears in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.
Johnson with his family in the Yellow Oval Room, Christmas 1968
Front view of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum located on the campus of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas
Entrance to the Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

Incumbent Democratic United States President Lyndon B. Johnson defeated Barry Goldwater, the Republican nominee, in a landslide.

- 1964 United States presidential election

Johnson received 61.1% of the popular vote in the 1964 presidential election; this makes his victory the largest share of the popular vote of any candidate since James Monroe's victory in 1820.

- Lyndon B. Johnson
Oval Office photo, 1964

12 related topics

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Senate portrait, 1960

Barry Goldwater

Senate portrait, 1960
Major General Barry M. Goldwater in his United States Air Force uniform
Major General Barry M. Goldwater in his office at Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. in January 1967
Major General Barry M. Goldwater piloting a Convair F-102 Delta Dagger in 1967
President Lyndon B. Johnson with Senator Goldwater, January 16, 1964
Ronald Reagan speaks for presidential candidate Goldwater in Los Angeles, 1964
Presidential election results by state
Goldwater meets with President Ronald Reagan in the oval office, 1984
President Ronald Reagan and Senator Goldwater award retired General Jimmy Doolittle, USAFR, with a fourth star, April 10, 1985
Informal press conference August 7, 1974 (one day before Nixon announced his resignation) following a meeting between Goldwater, Senate Minority Leader Scott, House Minority Leader Rhodes and the President to discuss the Watergate scandal and impeachment process
Signing autographs at the Fiesta Bowl parade in 1983
Most of the kachina dolls at the Heard Museum were donated by Goldwater
The Goldwater Crypt#64
Barry M. Goldwater Terminal 4 entrance at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
Barry Goldwater statue in National Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.
The Barry Goldwater Memorial Park

Barry Morris Goldwater (January 2, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was an American politician and United States Air Force officer who was a five-term Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–1987) and the Republican Party nominee for president of the United States in 1964.

Goldwater's platform ultimately failed to gain the support of the electorate and he lost the 1964 presidential election to incumbent Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson by one of the largest margins in history.

King in 1964

Martin Luther King Jr.

American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesman and leader in the civil rights movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.

American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesman and leader in the civil rights movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.

King in 1964
King's childhood home in Atlanta, Georgia
The high school that King attended was named after African-American educator Booker T. Washington.
King received a Bachelor of Divinity degree at Crozer Theological Seminary (pictured in 2009).
Martin Luther King, Jr. with his wife, Coretta Scott King, and daughter, Yolanda Denise King, in 1956
King (left) with civil rights activist Rosa Parks (right) in 1955
King first rose to prominence in the civil rights movement while minister of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
King led the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and later became co-pastor with his father at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta (pulpit and sanctuary pictured).
Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy with King, Benjamin Mays, and other civil rights leaders, June 22, 1963
King was arrested in 1963 for protesting the treatment of blacks in Birmingham.
Leaders of the March on Washington posing in front of the Lincoln Memorial
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963)
King gave his most famous speech, "I Have a Dream", before the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
King at a press conference in March 1964
The civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965
King standing behind President Johnson as he signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964
President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting with King in the White House Cabinet Room in 1966
King speaking to an anti-Vietnam war rally at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul on April 27, 1967
A shantytown established in Washington, D. C. to protest economic conditions as a part of the Poor People's Campaign
The Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated, is now the site of the National Civil Rights Museum.
The sarcophagus for Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King is within the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park in Atlanta, Georgia.
Martin Luther King Jr. statue over the west entrance of Westminster Abbey, installed in 1998
Banner at the 2012 Republican National Convention
King at the 1963 Civil Rights March in Washington, D.C.
King worked alongside Quakers such as Bayard Rustin to develop nonviolent tactics.
The only meeting of King and Malcolm X, outside the United States Senate chamber, March 26, 1964, during the Senate debates regarding the (eventual) Civil Rights Act of 1964.
The FBI–King suicide letter, mailed anonymously by the FBI
King showing his medallion, which he received from Mayor Wagner, 1964

In 1964, King urged his supporters "and all people of goodwill" to vote against Republican Senator Barry Goldwater for president, saying that his election "would be a tragedy, and certainly suicidal almost, for the nation and the world."

Lyndon B. Johnson once said that King was a "hypocritical preacher".

Official portrait, 1965

Hubert Humphrey

American pharmacist and politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969.

American pharmacist and politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969.

Official portrait, 1965
Humphrey working as a pharmacist in his father's pharmacy.
Humphrey at the 1948 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
Senator Humphrey
In the 1960 primaries, Humphrey won South Dakota and Washington, D.C.
Vice President-elect Humphrey alongside Coretta Scott King and Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Humphrey (right) with President Johnson (left) horse-riding in LBJ ranch on November 4, 1964.
Vice President Humphrey at a meeting in the Oval Office, June 21, 1965
Humphrey with Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin and Gemini 4 astronauts at the 1965 Paris Air Show
Vice President Hubert Humphrey, President Lyndon Johnson, and General Creighton Abrams in a Cabinet Room meeting in March 1968
Hubert Humphrey campaigning for President in 1968
Senator Hubert Humphrey with Democratic presidential nominee Jimmy Carter, in 1976. California Governor Jerry Brown is at right.
1972 campaign logo
Senator Hubert Humphrey with President Jimmy Carter aboard Air Force One in 1977
Burial plot of Hubert and Muriel Humphrey at Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis

As President Lyndon Johnson's vice president, he supported the controversial Vietnam War.

After Lyndon B. Johnson acceded to the presidency, he chose Humphrey as his running mate, and the Democratic ticket won a landslide victory in the 1964 election.

Georgia (U.S. state)

State in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee and North Carolina; to the northeast by South Carolina; to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean; to the south by Florida; and to the west by Alabama.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee and North Carolina; to the northeast by South Carolina; to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean; to the south by Florida; and to the west by Alabama.

The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, 1864
Martin Luther King Jr.'s tomb, on the grounds of Atlanta's urban Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park
Road to Brasstown Bald
Jekyll Island
Okefenokee Swamp
USGS map of Georgia elevations
Köppen climate classification types of Georgia
Image of March 1993 Storm of the Century covering the length of the east coast. The outline of Georgia is discernible in the center of the image.
Downtown Atlanta
Population density by census tract in the state of Georgia, 2018
The Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, with the distinctive gold dome
Savannah City Hall
A cotton field in southern Georgia
Reverse of the U.S. State Quarter for Georgia
Fort Stewart
Filming of Captain America: Civil War in Atlanta, 2015
Savannah's River Street is a popular tourist destination.
The Fox Theatre in Midtown Atlanta, centerpiece of the Historic District
Kickoff, Sanford Stadium, Athens
Georgia Tech's Tech Tower
One of the entrances to the University of Georgia
The CNN Center in Atlanta
The Port of Brunswick and the Sidney Lanier Bridge
MARTA (rapid transit) train
Rosa laevigata (Cherokee rose), the state flower
Quercus virginiana (Live oak), the state tree at Valdosta State University

In 1964, it was one of only a handful of states to vote for Republican Barry Goldwater over Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson.

United States President John F. Kennedy addresses the nation on civil rights on June 11, 1963

Civil Rights Act of 1964

Landmark civil rights and labor law in the United States that outlaws discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin.

Landmark civil rights and labor law in the United States that outlaws discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin.

United States President John F. Kennedy addresses the nation on civil rights on June 11, 1963
Following the March on Washington on August 28, 1963, civil rights leaders met with President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson to discuss civil rights legislation.
First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X at the United States Capitol on March 26, 1964, listening to the Senate debate on the bill. This was the only time the two men ever met; their meeting lasted only one minute.
United States President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Among the guests behind him is Martin Luther King Jr.
A map showing the each Senator's Vote on the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
The record of the roll call vote kept by the House Clerk on final passage of the bill
Engrossing copy of H.R. 7152, which added sex to the categories of persons against whom the bill prohibited discrimination, as passed by the House of Representatives
United States President Lyndon B. Johnson speaks to a television camera at the signing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964

After Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson pushed the bill forward.

Johnson, however, went on to win the 1964 election by one of the biggest landslides in American history.

Lyndon B. Johnson portrait, taken in December 1963

Daisy (advertisement)

Controversial political advertisement that aired on television as part of Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 presidential campaign.

Controversial political advertisement that aired on television as part of Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 presidential campaign.

Lyndon B. Johnson portrait, taken in December 1963
Barry Goldwater in September 1962

Though officially aired only once, it is considered one of the most important factors in Johnson's landslide victory over the Republican Party's candidate, Barry Goldwater, and a turning point in political and advertising history.

Following the assassination of his predecessor John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as president of the United States in November 1963.

Arizona

State in the Western United States, grouped in the Southwestern and occasionally Mountain subregions.

State in the Western United States, grouped in the Southwestern and occasionally Mountain subregions.

La conquista del Colorado, by Augusto Ferrer-Dalmau, depicts Francisco Vázquez de Coronado's 1540–1542 expedition
Mexico in 1824. Alta California is the northwesternmost state.
Geronimo (far right) and his Apache warriors fought against both Mexican and American settlers.
Children of Depression-era migrant workers, Pinal County, 1937
Eleanor Roosevelt at the Gila River relocation center, April 23, 1943
Köppen climate types of Arizona
The Grand Canyon
View of suburban development in Scottsdale, 2006
A population density map of Arizona
Extent of the Spanish language in the state of Arizona
A Navajo man on horseback in Monument Valley
The Spanish mission of San Xavier del Bac, founded in 1700
Arizona's Meteor Crater is a tourist attraction.
Entering Arizona on I-10 from New Mexico
The original Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix
Art Deco doors of the Cochise County Courthouse in Bisbee
Arizona teacher's strike and rally on April 26, 2018
The University of Arizona (the Mall) in Tucson
Arizona State University (a biodesign building) in Tempe
Northern Arizona University (The Skydome) in Flagstaff
View of Monument Valley from John Ford's Point
Standin' on the Corner Park and mural in Winslow, Arizona
State Farm Stadium in Glendale
A spring training game between the Cubs and White Sox at HoHoKam Park

Democrat Lyndon Johnson, in 1964, lost the state by fewer than 5,000 votes to Arizona Senator and native Barry Goldwater.

1932 United States presidential election

The 37th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1932.

The 37th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1932.

President Herbert Hoover and White House Press Secretary Theodore Joslin
Hoover addresses a large crowd in his 1932 campaign.
Roosevelt (seated, center) at Greenway Ranch in Williams, Arizona on September 26, 1932. He is accompanied by U.S. Senator from Arizona Carl Hayden standing far right, along with – among others – three Democrats from the U.S. Senate (seated): Pittman, Walsh, and Cohen.
Presidential election results by county
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Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York
Former Governor Al Smith of New York <center> (campaign) </center>
Speaker of the House John Nance Garner of Texas
Governor William H. Murray of Oklahoma
President Herbert Hoover
Former Senator Joseph I. France from Maryland
Calvin Coolidge, former President of the United States (declined)
Senator Dwight Morrow from New Jersey (died)
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Democratic presidential election results by county
Republican presidential election results by county
"Other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "Other" presidential election results by county

Roosevelt's victory with 472 electoral votes stood until the 1964 victory of Lyndon B. Johnson, who won 486 electoral votes in 1964, as the most ever won by a first-time contestant in a presidential election.

Pens used by President Lyndon B. Johnson to sign Great Society legislation

Great Society

Pens used by President Lyndon B. Johnson to sign Great Society legislation
President Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965
The August 1964 signing of the Poverty Bill
President Johnson signs the Social Security Act of 1965.

The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65.

With the exception of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Great Society agenda was not a widely discussed issue during the 1964 presidential election campaign.

President Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and Texas governor John Connally with his wife, Nellie, in the presidential limousine, minutes before the assassination. Secret Service agents William Greer (driving) and Roy Kellerman are in the front seats.

Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. CST in Dallas, Texas, while riding in a presidential motorcade through Dealey Plaza.

Assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. CST in Dallas, Texas, while riding in a presidential motorcade through Dealey Plaza.

President Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and Texas governor John Connally with his wife, Nellie, in the presidential limousine, minutes before the assassination. Secret Service agents William Greer (driving) and Roy Kellerman are in the front seats.
Dealey Plaza showing the route of Kennedy's motorcade. In the overhead view north is at left.
President Kennedy's motorcade on Main Street, approaching Dealey Plaza
Dealey Plaza, with Elm Street on the right and the Triple Underpass in the middle. The white concrete pergola, from which Zapruder was filming, is at the right, and the Grassy Knoll is in front of it (slightly left of it in the picture). The red brick building partially visible at the upper right is the Texas School Book Depository. Kennedy was struck by the final bullet when he was just left of the lamp-post in front of the pergola.
Bill and Gayle Newman dropped to the grass and shielded their children.
Jack Ruby shooting Oswald, who was being escorted by police detective Jim Leavelle (tan suit) for the transfer from the city jail to the county jail.
Cecil Stoughton's iconic photograph of Lyndon B. Johnson being sworn in as President as Air Force One prepares to depart Love Field in Dallas. Jacqueline Kennedy (right), still in her blood-spattered clothes (not visible here), looks on.
The Bell & Howell Zoomatic movie camera used by Abraham Zapruder to shoot footage of the motorcade, which later came to be known as the Zapruder film. The camera is preserved within the collection of the U.S. National Archives.
The Warren Commission presents its report to President Johnson. From left to right: John McCloy, J. Lee Rankin (General Counsel), Senator Richard Russell, Congressman Gerald Ford, Chief Justice Earl Warren, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Allen Dulles, Senator John Sherman Cooper, and Congressman Hale Boggs.
The wooden fence on the grassy knoll, where many conspiracy theorists believe another gunman stood
Dealey Plaza and Texas School Book Depository in 1969, six years after the assassination
Plaque on the Texas School Book Depository building
Looking southeast across Elm St. in 2006, with the pergola and knoll behind the photographer: The white 'X' marks the point at which Kennedy was struck in the head.

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson automatically became president upon Kennedy's death.

2) To begin his quest for reelection in November 1964; and