1964 United States presidential election

President and Mrs. Kennedy, moments before his assassination
First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Results by congressional district.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Governor George Wallace of Alabama
Senator Hiram Fong from Hawaii
Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania
Senator Margaret Chase Smith from Maine
Representative John W. Byrnes from Wisconsin
U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., from Massachusetts
Governor Jim Rhodes of Ohio
Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York
Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Presidential election results by county
Democratic presidential election results by county
Republican presidential election results by county
Unpledged electors presidential election results by county
"Other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of unpledged electors presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "Other" presidential election results by county

The 45th quadrennial presidential election.

- 1964 United States presidential election

45 related topics

Alpha

Lyndon B. Johnson portrait, taken in December 1963

Daisy (advertisement)

Controversial political advertisement that aired on television as part of Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 presidential campaign.

Controversial political advertisement that aired on television as part of Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 presidential campaign.

Lyndon B. Johnson portrait, taken in December 1963
Barry Goldwater in September 1962

Though officially aired only once, it is considered one of the most important factors in Johnson's landslide victory over the Republican Party's candidate, Barry Goldwater, and a turning point in political and advertising history.

Arkansas voted Democratic in all 23 presidential elections from 1876 through 1964; other states were not quite as solid but generally supported Democrats for president.

Solid South

The electoral voting bloc of the states of the Southern United States for issues that were regarded as particularly important to the interests of Democrats in those states.

The electoral voting bloc of the states of the Southern United States for issues that were regarded as particularly important to the interests of Democrats in those states.

Arkansas voted Democratic in all 23 presidential elections from 1876 through 1964; other states were not quite as solid but generally supported Democrats for president.
United States during the Civil War. Blue represents free Union states, including those admitted during the war; light blue represents border states; red represents Confederate states. Unshaded areas were not states before or during the Civil War
The "Solid South" from 1880–1912.
Missouri goes for Republican Theodore Roosevelt in the 1904 election. (Cartoon by John T. McCutcheon.)

The Southern bloc existed especially between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964.

Arizona

State in the Western United States, grouped in the Southwestern and occasionally Mountain subregions.

State in the Western United States, grouped in the Southwestern and occasionally Mountain subregions.

La conquista del Colorado, by Augusto Ferrer-Dalmau, depicts Francisco Vázquez de Coronado's 1540–1542 expedition
Mexico in 1824. Alta California is the northwesternmost state.
Geronimo (far right) and his Apache warriors fought against both Mexican and American settlers.
Children of Depression-era migrant workers, Pinal County, 1937
Eleanor Roosevelt at the Gila River relocation center, April 23, 1943
Köppen climate types of Arizona
The Grand Canyon
View of suburban development in Scottsdale, 2006
A population density map of Arizona
Extent of the Spanish language in the state of Arizona
A Navajo man on horseback in Monument Valley
The Spanish mission of San Xavier del Bac, founded in 1700
Arizona's Meteor Crater is a tourist attraction.
Entering Arizona on I-10 from New Mexico
The original Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix
Art Deco doors of the Cochise County Courthouse in Bisbee
Arizona teacher's strike and rally on April 26, 2018
The University of Arizona (the Mall) in Tucson
Arizona State University (a biodesign building) in Tempe
Northern Arizona University (The Skydome) in Flagstaff
View of Monument Valley from John Ford's Point
Standin' on the Corner Park and mural in Winslow, Arizona
State Farm Stadium in Glendale
A spring training game between the Cubs and White Sox at HoHoKam Park

Democrat Lyndon Johnson, in 1964, lost the state by fewer than 5,000 votes to Arizona Senator and native Barry Goldwater.

California

State in the Western United States.

State in the Western United States.

A map of California tribal groups and languages at the time of European contact
The coat of arms granted to the Californias by Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza
Mission San Diego de Alcalá drawn as it was in 1848. Established in 1769, it was the first of the California Missions.
Map showing Alta California in 1838, when it was a sparsely populated Mexican province
The flag used by Juan Bautista Alvarado's 1836 movement for Californian independence
The Russians from Alaska established their largest settlement in California, Fort Ross, in 1812.
The Bear Flag of the California Republic was first raised in Sonoma in 1846 during the Bear Flag Revolt.
Yokayo, a village of Pomo people in Ukiah (Mendocino County), c. 1916
Hollywood film studios, 1922
The "Birthplace of Silicon Valley" garage, where Stanford University graduates Bill Hewlett and David Packard developed their first product in the 1930s
A topographic map of California
Big Sur coast, south of Monterey at Bixby Bridge
Yosemite National Park
Cylindropuntia bigelovii in the Joshua Tree National Park
Köppen climate types in California
Death Valley, in the Mojave Desert
Five of the twenty largest wildfires in California history were part of the 2020 wildfire season.
A Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) in Joshua Tree
A forest of redwood trees in Redwood National Park
Sea otter in Morro Bay, California
Mission San Diego de Alcalá, first of the Spanish missions in California
Sunset at Venice Beach
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum hosted the Summer Olympics in 1932 and 1984.
Torrance High School, one of the oldest high schools in continuous use in California
The University of California, Berkeley is the first and oldest campus of the UC system.
The Claremont Colleges east of L.A. include some of the most selective liberal arts colleges in the U.S.
A tree map depicting the distribution of occupations across California
Orange Grove outside of Santa Paula
The Googleplex in Mountain View, California, is the corporate headquarters of Google. Silicon Valley is a center for the global technology industry.
Economic regions of California
Moss Landing Power Plant, located on the coast of Monterey Bay
Solar Energy Generating Systems, located in the Mojave Desert
The Golden Gate Bridge
The Judge Harry Pregerson Interchange in Los Angeles, one of California's tall "stack" interchanges
Map of California showing the primary roadways
Amtrak California train in Pinole
Aerial view of the Delta–Mendota Canal (left) and the California Aqueduct, at the Interstate 205 crossing west of Tracy
California budget 2022-2023
The California State Capitol in Sacramento
Democrats Jerry Brown and Eric Garcetti. Brown served twice as Governor of California and Garcetti is currently serving as Mayor of Los Angeles.
California GDP by sector in 2017<ref name="auto">{{Cite web |title=SAGDP2N Gross domestic product (GDP) by state |url=https://www.bea.gov/data/gdp/gdp-state |access-date=December 21, 2018 |publisher=Bureau of Economic Analysis}}</ref>
Had California been an independent country in 2021 its gross domestic product (nominal) would have been ranked fifth in the world.<ref>{{Cite web |title=5. Report for Selected Countries and Subjects |url=https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2016/01/weodata/weorept.aspx?pr.x=69&pr.y=15&sy=2018&ey=2018&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=512%2C672%2C914%2C946%2C612%2C137%2C614%2C546%2C311%2C962%2C213%2C674%2C911%2C676%2C193%2C548%2C122%2C556%2C912%2C678%2C313%2C181%2C419%2C867%2C513%2C682%2C316%2C684%2C913%2C273%2C124%2C868%2C339%2C921%2C638%2C948%2C514%2C943%2C218%2C686%2C963%2C688%2C616%2C518%2C223%2C728%2C516%2C558%2C918%2C138%2C748%2C196%2C618%2C278%2C624%2C692%2C522%2C694%2C622%2C142%2C156%2C449%2C626%2C564%2C628%2C565%2C228%2C283%2C924%2C853%2C233%2C288%2C632%2C293%2C636%2C566%2C634%2C964%2C238%2C182%2C662%2C359%2C960%2C453%2C423%2C968%2C935%2C922%2C128%2C714%2C611%2C862%2C321%2C135%2C243%2C716%2C248%2C456%2C469%2C722%2C253%2C942%2C642%2C718%2C643%2C724%2C939%2C576%2C644%2C936%2C819%2C961%2C172%2C813%2C132%2C199%2C646%2C733%2C648%2C184%2C915%2C524%2C134%2C361%2C652%2C362%2C174%2C364%2C328%2C732%2C258%2C366%2C656%2C734%2C654%2C144%2C336%2C146%2C263%2C463%2C268%2C528%2C532%2C923%2C944%2C738%2C176%2C578%2C534%2C537%2C536%2C742%2C429%2C866%2C433%2C369%2C178%2C744%2C436%2C186%2C136%2C925%2C343%2C869%2C158%2C746%2C439%2C926%2C916%2C466%2C664%2C112%2C826%2C111%2C542%2C298%2C967%2C927%2C443%2C846%2C917%2C299%2C544%2C582%2C941%2C474%2C446%2C754%2C666%2C698%2C668&s=NGDPD&grp=0&a= |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190323111307/https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2016/01/weodata/weorept.aspx?pr.x=69&pr.y=15&sy=2018&ey=2018&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=512%2C672%2C914%2C946%2C612%2C137%2C614%2C546%2C311%2C962%2C213%2C674%2C911%2C676%2C193%2C548%2C122%2C556%2C912%2C678%2C313%2C181%2C419%2C867%2C513%2C682%2C316%2C684%2C913%2C273%2C124%2C868%2C339%2C921%2C638%2C948%2C514%2C943%2C218%2C686%2C963%2C688%2C616%2C518%2C223%2C728%2C516%2C558%2C918%2C138%2C748%2C196%2C618%2C278%2C624%2C692%2C522%2C694%2C622%2C142%2C156%2C449%2C626%2C564%2C628%2C565%2C228%2C283%2C924%2C853%2C233%2C288%2C632%2C293%2C636%2C566%2C634%2C964%2C238%2C182%2C662%2C359%2C960%2C453%2C423%2C968%2C935%2C922%2C128%2C714%2C611%2C862%2C321%2C135%2C243%2C716%2C248%2C456%2C469%2C722%2C253%2C942%2C642%2C718%2C643%2C724%2C939%2C576%2C644%2C936%2C819%2C961%2C172%2C813%2C132%2C199%2C646%2C733%2C648%2C184%2C915%2C524%2C134%2C361%2C652%2C362%2C174%2C364%2C328%2C732%2C258%2C366%2C656%2C734%2C654%2C144%2C336%2C146%2C263%2C463%2C268%2C528%2C532%2C923%2C944%2C738%2C176%2C578%2C534%2C537%2C536%2C742%2C429%2C866%2C433%2C369%2C178%2C744%2C436%2C186%2C136%2C925%2C343%2C869%2C158%2C746%2C439%2C926%2C916%2C466%2C664%2C112%2C826%2C111%2C542%2C298%2C967%2C927%2C443%2C846%2C917%2C299%2C544%2C582%2C941%2C474%2C446%2C754%2C666%2C698%2C668&s=NGDPD&grp=0&a= |archive-date=March 23, 2019 |access-date=December 15, 2018}}</ref>
Köppen climate types in California
The famous Tunnel tree at Yosemite National Park in May of 2022

From 1952 through 1988, California was a Republican leaning state, with the party carrying the state's electoral votes in nine of ten elections, with 1964 as the exception.

King in 1964

Martin Luther King Jr.

American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesman and leader in the civil rights movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.

American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesman and leader in the civil rights movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.

King in 1964
King's childhood home in Atlanta, Georgia
The high school that King attended was named after African-American educator Booker T. Washington.
King received a Bachelor of Divinity degree at Crozer Theological Seminary (pictured in 2009).
Martin Luther King, Jr. with his wife, Coretta Scott King, and daughter, Yolanda Denise King, in 1956
King (left) with civil rights activist Rosa Parks (right) in 1955
King first rose to prominence in the civil rights movement while minister of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
King led the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and later became co-pastor with his father at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta (pulpit and sanctuary pictured).
Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy with King, Benjamin Mays, and other civil rights leaders, June 22, 1963
King was arrested in 1963 for protesting the treatment of blacks in Birmingham.
Leaders of the March on Washington posing in front of the Lincoln Memorial
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963)
King gave his most famous speech, "I Have a Dream", before the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
King at a press conference in March 1964
The civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965
King standing behind President Johnson as he signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964
President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting with King in the White House Cabinet Room in 1966
King speaking to an anti-Vietnam war rally at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul on April 27, 1967
A shantytown established in Washington, D. C. to protest economic conditions as a part of the Poor People's Campaign
The Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated, is now the site of the National Civil Rights Museum.
The sarcophagus for Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King is within the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park in Atlanta, Georgia.
Martin Luther King Jr. statue over the west entrance of Westminster Abbey, installed in 1998
Banner at the 2012 Republican National Convention
King at the 1963 Civil Rights March in Washington, D.C.
King worked alongside Quakers such as Bayard Rustin to develop nonviolent tactics.
The only meeting of King and Malcolm X, outside the United States Senate chamber, March 26, 1964, during the Senate debates regarding the (eventual) Civil Rights Act of 1964.
The FBI–King suicide letter, mailed anonymously by the FBI
King showing his medallion, which he received from Mayor Wagner, 1964

In 1964, King urged his supporters "and all people of goodwill" to vote against Republican Senator Barry Goldwater for president, saying that his election "would be a tragedy, and certainly suicidal almost, for the nation and the world."

Nebraska

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

Nebraska in 1718, Guillaume de L'Isle map, with the approximate area of the future state highlighted
Homesteaders in central Nebraska in 1888
A map of Nebraska
Nebraska National Forest
Köppen climate types of Nebraska, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Winter at Scotts Bluff National Monument
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Nebraska grain bins and elevator
A cropduster in agrarian Nebraska, far west of Omaha
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Nebraska State Capitol in Lincoln
Football game at the University of Nebraska on September6, 2008

Republicans have carried the state in all but one presidential election since 1940: the 1964 landslide election of Lyndon B. Johnson.

2008 United States presidential election

The 56th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008.

The 56th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008.

The incumbent in 2008, George W. Bush. His second term expired at noon on January 20, 2009.
2008 DNC during Stevie Wonder's performance
The Palins and McCains campaigning in Fairfax, Virginia, September 10, 2008, following the Republican National Convention
Obama campaigning as a symbol of change in Cleveland, Ohio with a "Change We Need" sign
Cartogram of the Electoral Votes for 2008 United States presidential election, each square representing one electoral vote. The map shows the impact of winning swing states. Nebraska, being one of two states that are not winner-take-all, for the first time had its votes split, with its second congressional district voting for Obama.
An Obama sign displayed at a home in Arlington, VA, on November 1, 2008.
States/districts in the 2008 United States Presidential election in which the margin of victory was less than 5%. Blue states/districts went for Obama, red for McCain. Yellow states were won by either candidate by 5% or more. Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico, Virginia and Iowa were won by Bush in 2004 but were won by Obama by a margin of more than 5% in 2008.
Swing by state. States are listed by (increasing) percentage of Democratic votes, showing how the share of the vote changed between 2004 and 2008. Excluding the candidates' home states, only five states trended more Republican: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and West Virginia.
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Popular vote by county. Red represents counties that went for McCain; blue represents counties that went for Obama. Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont had all counties go to Obama. Oklahoma had all counties go to McCain.
Presidential popular votes by county as a scale from red/Republican to blue/Democratic.
Cartogram of popular vote with each county rescaled in proportion to its population. Deeper blue represents a Democratic majority; brighter red represents a Republican majority.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mejn/election/2008/|title=Election maps|website=www-personal.umich.edu}}</ref>
Voting shifts per county from the 2004 to the 2008 election. Darker blue indicates the county voted more Democratic. Darker red indicates the county voted more Republican.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Change in vote margins at the county level from the 2004 election to the 2008 election. Obama made dramatic gains in every region of the country except for Arizona (McCain's home state), Alaska (Palin's home state), Appalachia, and the inner South, where McCain improved over Bush.
Results by Congressional Districts, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.

Obama received the largest share of the popular vote won by a Democrat since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and was the first Democrat to win an outright majority of the popular vote since Jimmy Carter in 1976.

1980 United States presidential election

The 49th quadrennial presidential election.

The 49th quadrennial presidential election.

Ronald Reagan campaigning with his wife Nancy and Senator Strom Thurmond in Columbia, South Carolina, October 10, 1980
Ronald Reagan campaigning in Florida
Ronald Reagan shaking hands with supporters at a campaign stop in Indiana
President Carter (left) and former Governor Reagan (right) at the presidential debate on October 28, 1980
Election results by county
Results by congressional district
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote

Due to the rise of conservatism following Reagan's victory, some historians consider the election to be a political realignment that began with Barry Goldwater's presidential campaign in 1964, and the 1980 election marked the start of the Reagan Era.

Official portrait, 1975

Nelson Rockefeller

American businessman and politician who served as the 41st vice president of the United States from December 1974 to January 1977, and previously as the 49th governor of New York from 1959 to 1973.

American businessman and politician who served as the 41st vice president of the United States from December 1974 to January 1977, and previously as the 49th governor of New York from 1959 to 1973.

Official portrait, 1975
Nelson Rockefeller, Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs (1940)
Rockefeller (right) with Brazilian President Getúlio Vargas in 1942
Nelson Rockefeller, Under Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, makes a presentation on a proposed public/private health reinsurance program, 1954.
Vice President Rockefeller (right) with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, January 3, 1975.
Gov. Rockefeller meets with President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1968
Rockefeller addresses a February 1975 meeting of the Commission on Critical Choices for Americans
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Rockefeller campaigning for the Republican presidential nomination in 1968
Rockefeller (front row, 5th from left) at the 1976 Republican National Convention along with (left to right) Robert Dole, Nancy Reagan, Ronald Reagan, President Gerald Ford, Susan Ford and Betty Ford.
Vice President Rockefeller (right) and his wife Happy (second on left) entertain President Gerald R. Ford (left) his wife Betty (second on right) and their daughter Susan (center) at Number One Observatory Circle on September 7, 1975.
Rockefeller and President Jimmy Carter in October 1977
Nelson A. Rockefeller Park is an enclave within Battery Park City in New York City.

Rockefeller, as the leader of the Republicans' "Eastern Establishment," began as the front-runner for the 1964 nomination against conservative Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, who led the conservative wing of the Republican Party.

1992 United States presidential election

The 52nd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 1992.

The 52nd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 1992.

Ross Perot was on the ballot in every state; in six states (Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Louisiana, Oregon, Pennsylvania) Perot was placed on the ballot through the formation of a political party supporting his candidacy. His electoral performance in each of those states led to those parties being given ballot-qualified status.
Businessman Ross Perot from Texas
Andre Marrou was on the ballot in every state.
Lenora Fulani was on the ballot in thirty-nine states (352 Electoral Votes). Those states with a lighter shade are states in which she was an official write-in candidate.
John Hagelin was on the ballot in twenty-eight states (264 Electoral Votes). Those states with a lighter shade are states in which he was an official write-in candidate.
Howard Phillips was on the ballot in twenty-one states (215 Electoral Votes). Those states with a lighter shade are states in which he was an official write-in candidate.
Bo Gritz was on the ballot in eighteen states (161 Electoral Votes). Those states with a lighter shade are states in which he was an official write-in candidate.
Lyndon LaRouche was on the ballot in seventeen states (156 Electoral Votes). Those states with a lighter shade are states in which he was an official write-in candidate.
James Warren was on the ballot in thirteen states (148 Electoral Votes). Those states with a lighter shade are states in which he was an official write-in candidate.
Ron Daniels was on the ballot in eight states (126 Electoral Votes). Those states with a lighter shade are states in which he was an official write-in candidate.
Results by congressional district.
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Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote

Clinton was also the only Democrat at that point to win every electoral vote in the Northeast except for Lyndon Johnson in 1964.