1976 Cincinnati Reds season

Cincinnati Reds19761976 Cincinnati RedsCincinnatiReds1976 Cincinnati club1976 Reds76 RedsCincinnati Reds in 1976to 1976
The 1976 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball.wikipedia
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1976 Philadelphia Phillies season

Philadelphia Phillies1976Philadelphia
They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees.
The Phillies lost the NLCS, 3–0 to the Cincinnati Reds.

1976 New York Yankees season

New York YankeesYankees1976
They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees.
In the World Series, they were defeated in a four-game sweep by the defending champion Cincinnati Reds, marking only the second time that the Yankees had ever been swept in a World Series in their history (following the 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers).

National League West

Western DivisionNL WestWest
The Reds dominated the league all season, and won their second consecutive National League West title with a record of 102–60, best record in MLB and finished 10 games ahead of the runner-up Los Angeles Dodgers.

Cincinnati Reds

RedsCincinnatiCIN
The 1976 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball.
The Reds won the NL West by ten games.

1976 World Series

1976World Series76
The Reds retained their NL pennant by winning the NLCS in three games over the Phillies, and their second consecutive World Series title by defeating the Yankees in four games, becoming only the second team to sweep a World Series from the Yankees (following the 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers).
The 1976 World Series matched the defending champions Cincinnati Reds of the National League against the New York Yankees of the American League, with the Reds sweeping the Series to repeat, avenging their 1939 and 1961 World Series losses to the Yankees in the process.

Johnny Bench

The "Big Red Machine" was at the height of its power in the 1976 season, with four future Hall-of-Famers (Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, Tony Pérez, and manager Sparky Anderson), the future MLB all-time hits leader Pete Rose, and a notable supporting line up including Dave Concepción at shortstop, and Ken Griffey, César Gerónimo, and George Foster in the outfield.
Bench struggled with ailing shoulders in 1976,

World Series

championship seriesWorld ChampionshipFall Classic
They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees.
9) The Cincinnati Reds were the only National League team to sweep any World Series between 1963 and 2012, sweeping their last two series appearances to date in 1976 and 1990. When added to their Game 7 victory in 1975, this means that the Reds have won their last 9 consecutive World Series games, making this the current longest winning streak in terms of consecutive World Series games won. The Reds are also to date the only team since the inception of the League Championship Series (LCS) in 1969 to sweep the entire postseason. The 1976 "Big Red Machine" swept the Philadelphia Phillies in the National League LCS in three games, and then swept the New York Yankees in the World Series in four games. The longest ever streak of consecutive World Series games won is 14 by the New York Yankees, who won four straight games to win the 1996 World Series after losing the first two games of that series, then swept their next two World Series appearances in 1998 and 1999, and then won the first two games of the 2000 World Series before losing the third game of that Series to the New York Mets.

1976 National League Championship Series

1976NLCS1976 NLCS
They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees.

Pete Rose

Peter Edward RoseRoseRose, Pete
The "Big Red Machine" was at the height of its power in the 1976 season, with four future Hall-of-Famers (Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, Tony Pérez, and manager Sparky Anderson), the future MLB all-time hits leader Pete Rose, and a notable supporting line up including Dave Concepción at shortstop, and Ken Griffey, César Gerónimo, and George Foster in the outfield.
The 1976 Reds swept the Philadelphia Phillies in the best-three-of-five NLCS, followed by a four-game sweep of the Yankees in the World Series.

Bob Howsam

Robert L Howsam
The 1976 Cincinnati club, which won 102 regular season games, then swept both the Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series and the Yankees in the 1976 World Series, is considered one of the strongest in baseball history.

1976 Los Angeles Dodgers season

1976Los Angeles DodgersDodgers
The Reds dominated the league all season, and won their second consecutive National League West title with a record of 102–60, best record in MLB and finished 10 games ahead of the runner-up Los Angeles Dodgers.

National League

NLNationalNational League (NL)
They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants.

1921 New York Giants season

New York Giants1921Giants
They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants.

1922 New York Giants season

New York Giants1922Giants
They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants.

History of the New York Giants (baseball)

New York GiantsNew YorkGiants
They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants.

Riverfront Stadium

Cincinnati24,719a multipurpose stadium
The Reds drew 2,629,708 fans to their home games at Riverfront Stadium, an all-time franchise attendance record.

Joaquín Andújar

AndújarAndujar
October 24, 1975: Joaquín Andújar was traded by the Reds to the Houston Astros for players to be named later. The Astros completed the deal by sending Luis Sánchez and Carlos Alfonso (minors) to the Reds on December 12.

Houston Astros

AstrosHoustonHOU
October 24, 1975: Joaquín Andújar was traded by the Reds to the Houston Astros for players to be named later. The Astros completed the deal by sending Luis Sánchez and Carlos Alfonso (minors) to the Reds on December 12.

Luis Sánchez (baseball)

Luis SánchezSánchezLuis (Mercedes) Sánchez
October 24, 1975: Joaquín Andújar was traded by the Reds to the Houston Astros for players to be named later. The Astros completed the deal by sending Luis Sánchez and Carlos Alfonso (minors) to the Reds on December 12.

Clay Carroll

Carroll
December 12, 1975: Clay Carroll was traded by the Reds to the Chicago White Sox for Rich Hinton and Jeff (minors).

Chicago White Sox

White SoxChicago White StockingsCWS
December 12, 1975: Clay Carroll was traded by the Reds to the Chicago White Sox for Rich Hinton and Jeff (minors).

Rich Hinton

Hinton
December 12, 1975: Clay Carroll was traded by the Reds to the Chicago White Sox for Rich Hinton and Jeff (minors).

Joe Morgan

Joe L. MorganJoe Morgan (2B)Morgan
The "Big Red Machine" was at the height of its power in the 1976 season, with four future Hall-of-Famers (Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, Tony Pérez, and manager Sparky Anderson), the future MLB all-time hits leader Pete Rose, and a notable supporting line up including Dave Concepción at shortstop, and Ken Griffey, César Gerónimo, and George Foster in the outfield.

Tony Pérez

Tony PerezAtanacio "Tony" Pérez Rigal
The "Big Red Machine" was at the height of its power in the 1976 season, with four future Hall-of-Famers (Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, Tony Pérez, and manager Sparky Anderson), the future MLB all-time hits leader Pete Rose, and a notable supporting line up including Dave Concepción at shortstop, and Ken Griffey, César Gerónimo, and George Foster in the outfield.

Sparky Anderson

George "Sparky" AndersonGeorge Lee "Sparky" AndersonGeorge Anderson
The "Big Red Machine" was at the height of its power in the 1976 season, with four future Hall-of-Famers (Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, Tony Pérez, and manager Sparky Anderson), the future MLB all-time hits leader Pete Rose, and a notable supporting line up including Dave Concepción at shortstop, and Ken Griffey, César Gerónimo, and George Foster in the outfield.