1979 Kurdish rebellion in Iran

1979 Kurdish rebellionKurdish rebellionKurdistan19791979 rebellion1979–1983 Kurdish insurgencyarmed Kurdish rebellionKordestan clashesKurdish insurgentsKurdish partisans
The 1979 Kurdish rebellion in Iran erupted in mid-March 1979, some two months after the completion of the Iranian Revolution.wikipedia
89 Related Articles

Consolidation of the Iranian Revolution

aftermathdomestic violencepost-revolutionary chaos
It subsequently became the largest among the nationwide uprisings in Iran against the new state and one of the most intense Kurdish rebellions in modern Iran.
Following the events of the revolution, Marxist guerrillas and federalist parties revolted in some regions comprising Khuzistan, Kurdistan and Gonbad-e Qabus, which resulted in fighting between them and revolutionary forces.

Komala Party of Iranian Kurdistan

KomalahKomalaKomala Party
The Kurdish forces included primarily the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan (KDPI) and the leftist Komala (Revolutionary Organization of Kurdish Toilers).
Komalah has been engaged in guerrilla warfare against the Iranian government, notably during the 1979 Kurdish rebellion and the Iran–Iraq War.

Iran–PJAK conflict

IranInsurrectionIran-PJAK conflict
Renewed insurgency in Iranian Kurdistan was undertaken since 2004 by another Kurdish militant organization—the PJAK, affiliated with the PKK.
The level of violence has ebbed and flowed with peaks of serious conflict in 1979, the early eighties and the early nineties.

Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan

Kurdistan Democratic Party of IranPDKIKDPI
The Kurdish forces included primarily the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan (KDPI) and the leftist Komala (Revolutionary Organization of Kurdish Toilers). While at first, Kurdish militants, primarily of the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan, made some territorial gains in the area of Mahabad and ousted the Iranian troops from the region, a large scale offensive in spring 1980 by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard reversed the course of the conflict.
This included the 1979–1983 Kurdish insurgency, its 1989–1996 insurgency and recent clashes in 2016.

Kurdish separatism in Iran

Kurdishseparatismin Iran
It subsequently became the largest among the nationwide uprisings in Iran against the new state and one of the most intense Kurdish rebellions in modern Iran.
In the most violent episode of the conflict, more than 30,000 Kurds died starting with the 1979 rebellion and the consequent KDPI insurgency.

Iran

PersiaIslamic Republic of IranIranian
Since April 1979 armed conflict broke out between Kurdish factions and the Iranian revolutionary government's security forces.
The immediate nationwide uprisings against the new government began with the 1979 Kurdish rebellion and the Khuzestan uprisings, along with the uprisings in Sistan and Baluchestan and other areas.

Iranian People's Fedai Guerrillas

Iranian People's Fadaee GuerrillasFadaiFedai Guerrillas
Reportedly, as much as 30% of OIFPG members joined the group and fought in the 1979 Kurdish rebellion against government forces, backing the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan.

Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou

GhassemlouAbdolrahman GhasemlouAbdul Rahman Qassemlou
Ayatollah Khomeini prevented Dr. Ghassemlou, the elected representative of the region, to participate in the assembly of experts’ first meeting.
Shortly, after the beginning of the armed Kurdish rebellion, Ayatollah Khomeini declared a "holy war" on the PDKI and Kurdish rebels.

Patriotic Union of Kurdistan

PUKPatriotic Union (Kurdistan)Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (Iraq)

Shah

ShahanshahShahzadaShahzadi
With traumatic experience during the Pahlavi rule in Iran and two major failed rebellions in 1946 and 1967, Kurdish political organizations were enthusiastic supporters of the revolution against the Shah, which brought Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to power in February 1979.

Ayatollah

AyatullahGrand AyatollahAyatollahs
With traumatic experience during the Pahlavi rule in Iran and two major failed rebellions in 1946 and 1967, Kurdish political organizations were enthusiastic supporters of the revolution against the Shah, which brought Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to power in February 1979.

Ruhollah Khomeini

Ayatollah KhomeiniKhomeiniAyatollah Ruhollah Khomeini
With traumatic experience during the Pahlavi rule in Iran and two major failed rebellions in 1946 and 1967, Kurdish political organizations were enthusiastic supporters of the revolution against the Shah, which brought Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to power in February 1979.

Constitution

constitutionalconstitutionsconstitutional government
Kurds were therefore deprived of their political rights under the new Iranian constitution, since the majority of them belonged to the Sunni branch of Islam.

Sunni Islam

SunniSunni MuslimSunni Muslims
Kurds were therefore deprived of their political rights under the new Iranian constitution, since the majority of them belonged to the Sunni branch of Islam.

Pahlavi dynasty

IranPahlaviImperial State of Iran
As the wave of nationalism engulfed eastern Kurdistan after the fall of the Pahlavi Dynasty in line with a series of anti-revolutionary revolts across the country (in Khuzestan, Iranian Balochistan and other parts of Iran), a full-scale rebellion was imminent.

Qarapapaqs

KarapapakKarapapakhTerekeme
One of the Azeri tribes involved in the fighting was the Karapapak tribe.

Jihad

holy warjihādoffensive jihad
As a result, Khomeini, the new religious leader of Iran, declared a jihad (holy struggle) and a fatwa (religious edict) against the Iranian Kurds and key Kurdish nationalist figures were declared "enemies of the state", like Ghassemlou, in his statement on August 17, 1979.

Fatwa

fatwāfatwasfatawa
As a result, Khomeini, the new religious leader of Iran, declared a jihad (holy struggle) and a fatwa (religious edict) against the Iranian Kurds and key Kurdish nationalist figures were declared "enemies of the state", like Ghassemlou, in his statement on August 17, 1979.

Baneh

Bane, Iran
The defeat in Mahabad was a major blow to the Iranian Kurds, and afterwards Iranian forces continued to march on the smaller town of Baneh.

Iran hostage crisis

Iranian hostage crisishostage crisisAmerican hostages
Kurdish effective initiative continued, as Iranian government was distracted by other events in the country, such as the American Embassy hostage crisis in Tehran.

Sanandaj

SennaSineSanandadsch
In the spring of 1980, government forces under the command of President Abolhassan Banisadr brutally conquered most of the Kurdish cities through a huge military campaign, sending in mechanized military divisions to Kurdish cities including Sanandaj, Pawe, and Marivan.

Paveh

PawehPawe
In the spring of 1980, government forces under the command of President Abolhassan Banisadr brutally conquered most of the Kurdish cities through a huge military campaign, sending in mechanized military divisions to Kurdish cities including Sanandaj, Pawe, and Marivan.

Marivan

Mariwan
In the spring of 1980, government forces under the command of President Abolhassan Banisadr brutally conquered most of the Kurdish cities through a huge military campaign, sending in mechanized military divisions to Kurdish cities including Sanandaj, Pawe, and Marivan.