1980 United States presidential election

19801980 presidential election1980 election1980 presidential campaign1980 U.S. presidential electionpresidential electionPresident1980 campaigngeneral election1980 campaign trail
The 1980 United States presidential election was the 49th quadrennial presidential election.wikipedia
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Ronald Reagan

ReaganPresident ReaganPresident Ronald Reagan
Republican nominee Ronald Reagan defeated incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter.
Four years later in 1980, he won the nomination, and then defeated incumbent president Jimmy Carter.

1980 Democratic Party presidential primaries

19801980 Democratic primary1980 Democratic presidential primaries
Carter defeated Kennedy in the majority of the Democratic primaries, but Kennedy remained in the race until Carter was officially nominated at the 1980 Democratic National Convention.
The 1980 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1980 U.S. presidential election.

1980 Republican Party presidential primaries

19801980 Republican presidential primaries1980 Republican primaries
The Republican primaries were contested between Reagan, who had previously served as the Governor of California, former Congressman George H. W. Bush of Texas, Congressman John B. Anderson of Illinois, and several other candidates.
The 1980 Republican presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Republican Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1980 U.S. presidential election.

John B. Anderson

John AndersonAndersonJohn Bayard Anderson
The Republican primaries were contested between Reagan, who had previously served as the Governor of California, former Congressman George H. W. Bush of Texas, Congressman John B. Anderson of Illinois, and several other candidates. Reagan dominated the primaries, early driving from the field Senate Minority Leader Howard Baker from Tennessee, former governor John Connally of Texas, Senator Robert Dole from Kansas, Representative Phil Crane from Illinois, and Representative John Anderson from Illinois, who dropped out of the race to run as an Independent.
In 1980, he ran an independent campaign for president, taking 6.6% of the popular vote.

Jimmy Carter

CarterPresident CarterPresident Jimmy Carter
Republican nominee Ronald Reagan defeated incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter.
Carter lost the general election in an electoral landslide to Republican nominee Ronald Reagan.

Iran hostage crisis

hostage crisisAmerican hostagesIranian hostage crisis
His campaign was aided by Democratic dissatisfaction with Carter, the Iran hostage crisis, and a worsening economy at home marked by high unemployment and inflation.
Political analysts cite it as a major factor in the downfall of Carter's presidency and his landslide loss in the 1980 presidential election; the hostages were formally released into United States custody the day after the signing of the Algiers Accords, just minutes after American President Ronald Reagan was sworn into office.

Realigning election

realignmentpolitical realignmentparty realignment
Due to the rise of conservativism following Reagan's victory, some historians consider the election to be a realigning election that marked the start of the "Reagan Era".
1980 presidential election — Ronald Reagan

Patrick Lucey

Pat LuceyPatrick J. LuceyPatrick Joseph Lucey
Anderson entered the race as an independent candidate, and convinced former Wisconsin Governor Patrick Lucey, a Democrat, to serve as his running mate.
He was also independent presidential candidate John B. Anderson's running mate in the 1980 presidential election.

George H. W. Bush

BushGeorge BushGeorge H.W. Bush
The Republican primaries were contested between Reagan, who had previously served as the Governor of California, former Congressman George H. W. Bush of Texas, Congressman John B. Anderson of Illinois, and several other candidates.
At the Republican Convention, Reagan made the last-minute decision to select Bush as his vice presidential nominee, placing him on the winning Republican presidential ticket of 1980.

Operation Eagle Claw

Eagle ClawIranian hostage rescue attemptattempt to rescue the hostages
On April 25, 1980, Carter's ability to use the hostage crisis to regain public acceptance eroded when his high risk attempt to rescue the hostages ended in disaster when eight servicemen were killed.
Carter himself blamed his loss in the 1980 U.S. presidential election mainly on his failure to win the release of the hostages.

Walter Mondale

MondaleWalter F. MondaleVice President Walter Mondale
Vice President Walter Mondale was also renominated.
Carter and Mondale's time in office was marred by a worsening economy and, although both were renominated by the Democratic Party, they lost the 1980 election to Republicans Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush.

John Connally

John B. Connally, Jr.ConnallyJohn B. Connally
Reagan dominated the primaries, early driving from the field Senate Minority Leader Howard Baker from Tennessee, former governor John Connally of Texas, Senator Robert Dole from Kansas, Representative Phil Crane from Illinois, and Representative John Anderson from Illinois, who dropped out of the race to run as an Independent.
Connally sought the Republican nomination for president in the 1980 election, but withdrew from the race after the first set of primaries.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
Reagan won the election by a landslide, taking a large majority of the electoral vote and 50.7% of the popular vote.

Barry Commoner

Commoner and HarrisCommoner, BarryDr. Barry Commoner
The Citizens Party ran biologist Barry Commoner for President and Comanche Native American activist LaDonna Harris for Vice President.
He ran as the Citizens Party candidate in the 1980 U.S. presidential election.

Ed Clark

Edward ClarkClark and Koch
The Libertarian Party nominated Ed Clark for President and David Koch for Vice President.
Edward E. Clark (born May 4, 1930) is an American lawyer and politician who ran for Governor of California in 1978, and for President of the United States as the nominee of the Libertarian Party in the 1980 presidential election.

Harold Stassen

Harold E. StassenStassen, HaroldStassen, Harold E.
Stassen was later best known for being a perennial candidate for the Republican Party nomination for President of the United States, seeking it nine times between 1944 and 1992 (1944, 1948, 1952, 1964, 1968, 1980, 1984, 1988, and 1992).

1980 United States Senate elections

1980re-electedRe-elected in 1980
In the simultaneous Congressional elections, Republicans won control of the United States Senate for the first time since 1955.
The 1980 United States Senate elections coincided with Ronald Reagan's victory in the presidential election.

LaDonna Harris

LaDonna Tabbytite
The Citizens Party ran biologist Barry Commoner for President and Comanche Native American activist LaDonna Harris for Vice President.
Harris was a vice presidential candidate for the Citizens Party in the United States presidential election, 1980 alongside Barry Commoner.

Supply-side economics

supply-sidesupply sidesupply side economics
Reagan campaigned for increased defense spending, implementation of supply-side economic policies, and a balanced budget.
When vying for the Republican Party presidential nomination for the 1980 election, George H. W. Bush derided Reagan's supply-side policies as "voodoo economics".

Libertarian Party (United States)

LibertarianLibertarian PartyL
The Libertarian Party nominated Ed Clark for President and David Koch for Vice President.

David Koch

New York State TheaterDavid H. KochDavid
The Libertarian Party nominated Ed Clark for President and David Koch for Vice President.
Koch was the Libertarian Party's vice-presidential candidate in the 1980 presidential election, sharing the party ticket with presidential candidate Ed Clark.

Reagan Democrat

usually voted Democraticconservative Democratssince at least 1980
Reagan's success as a conservative would initiate a realigning of the parties, as liberal Republicans and conservative Democrats would either leave politics or change party affiliations through the 1980s and 1990s to leave the parties much more ideologically polarized.
A Reagan Democrat is a traditionally Democratic voter in the United States, referring especially to White working-class Rust Belt residents, who defected from their party to support Republican President Ronald Reagan at either or both of the 1980 and 1984 presidential elections as well as Republican Presidents George H. W. Bush at the 1988 presidential election and George W. Bush at either or both of the 2000 and 2004 elections.

John F. Kennedy

KennedyPresident KennedyJFK
Carter's unpopularity and poor relations with Democratic leaders encouraged an intra-party challenge by Senator Ted Kennedy, a younger brother of former President John F. Kennedy.
Bobby would later run for president in 1968 before his assassination, while another Kennedy brother, Ted, ran for president in 1980.

Independent politician

IndependentIndependentsInd
Anderson entered the race as an independent candidate, and convinced former Wisconsin Governor Patrick Lucey, a Democrat, to serve as his running mate.
Since 1900, notable candidates running as independents for U.S. president have included Republican Congressman John Anderson in 1980, Ross Perot in 1992, and former Green Party candidate Ralph Nader in the 1996 and 2000 elections.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsElectoral College votes
The 1980 United States presidential election was the 49th quadrennial presidential election.