Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States (1829–1837) and the first Democratic president.
Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–1865) and the first Republican to hold the office
Martin Van Buren was the eighth president of the United States (1837–1841) and the second Democratic president.
Charles R. Jennison, an anti-slavery militia leader associated with the Jayhawkers from Kansas and an early Republican politician in the region
Ronald Reagan campaigning with his wife Nancy and Senator Strom Thurmond in Columbia, South Carolina, October 10, 1980
Senator Stephen A. Douglas
Ulysses S. Grant, 18th president of the United States (1869–1877)
Ronald Reagan campaigning in Florida
The 1885 inauguration of Grover Cleveland, the only president with non-consecutive terms
James G. Blaine, 28th & 31st Secretary of State (1881; 1889–1892)
Ronald Reagan shaking hands with supporters at a campaign stop in Indiana
Leaders of the Democratic Party during the first half of the 20th century on 14 June 1913: Secretary of State William J. Bryan, Josephus Daniels, President Woodrow Wilson, Breckinridge Long, William Phillips, and Franklin D. Roosevelt
William McKinley, 25th president of the United States (1897–1901)
President Carter (left) and former Governor Reagan (right) at the presidential debate on October 28, 1980
Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, 32nd and 33rd presidents of the United States (1933–1945; 1945–1953), featured on a campaign poster for the 1944 presidential election
Theodore Roosevelt, 26th president of the United States (1901–1909)
Election results by county
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 35th and 36th presidents of the United States (1961–1963, 1963–1969)
Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States (1929–1933)
Results by congressional district
Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the United States (1977–1981), delivering the State of the Union Address in 1979
Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States (1981–1989)
Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States (1993–2001), at The Pentagon in 1998
Donald Trump, 45th president of the United States (2017–2021)
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Barack Obama speaking to College Democrats of America in 2007
Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States (1923–1929)
President Barack Obama meeting with the Blue Dog Coalition in the State Dining Room of the White House in 2009
Arnold Schwarzenegger, 38th governor of California (2003–2011)
Eleanor Roosevelt at the 1956 Democratic National Convention in Chicago
John McCain, United States senator from Arizona (1987–2018)
President Barack Obama signing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010
Donald Rumsfeld, 21st United States Secretary of Defense (2001–2006)
Secretary of State John Kerry addressing delegates at the United Nations before signing the Paris Agreement on April 22, 2016
Colin Powell, 65th United States Secretary of State (2001–2005)
Shirley Chisholm was the first major-party African American candidate to run nationwide primary campaigns.
Newt Gingrich, 50th Speaker of the House of Representatives (1995–1999)
President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Immigration Act of 1965 as Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy and others look on
Annual population growth in the U.S. by county - 2010s
Then-Senator Barack Obama shaking hands with an American soldier in Basra, Iraq in 2008
This map shows the vote in the 2020 presidential election by county.
President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in 1978
Political Spectrum Libertarian Left    Centrist   Right  Authoritarian
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meeting with President Barack Obama at Ben Gurion Airport in 2013
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.
Self-identified Democrats (blue) versus self-identified Republicans (red) (January–June 2010 data)
Higher percentages of Democrats than Republicans are members of union households.
Elected at age 33, Jon Ossoff is currently the youngest member of the U.S. Senate.
Hillary Clinton was the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg
Vice President Kamala Harris
Julián Castro served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s.

- Democratic Party (United States)

Since the mid-1850s, it has been the main political rival of the Democratic Party.

- Republican Party (United States)

Republican nominee Ronald Reagan defeated incumbent Democratic president Jimmy Carter in a landslide victory.

- 1980 United States presidential election

With the initial support of evangelical Christian voters in the South, Carter was temporarily able to reunite the disparate factions within the party, but inflation and the Iran Hostage Crisis of 1979–1980 took their toll, resulting in a landslide victory for Republican presidential nominee Ronald Reagan in 1980, which shifted the political landscape in favor of the Republicans for years to come.

- Democratic Party (United States)

He'd go on to become governor of California two years later, and in 1980, win the presidency.

- Republican Party (United States)

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Official portrait, 1981

Ronald Reagan

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American politician who served as the 40th president of the United States from 1981 to 1989.

American politician who served as the 40th president of the United States from 1981 to 1989.

Official portrait, 1981
Ronald Reagan's boyhood home in Dixon, Illinois
The Bad Man (1941)
Capt. Ronald Reagan at Fort Roach, 1943 or 1944.
Guest stars for the premiere of The Dick Powell Show, 1961. Reagan can be seen wearing a ten-gallon hat on the far left.
Reagan testifying before the House Un-American Activities Committee, October 1947
Reagan and his first wife Jane Wyman, 1942
Wedding of Ronald and Nancy Reagan, 1952. Matron of honor Brenda Marshall (left) and best man William Holden (right) were the sole guests.
Nancy and Ronald Reagan aboard a boat in California, 1964
The Reagans meet with President Richard Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, July 1970
Reagan and President Ford shake hands on the podium after Reagan narrowly lost the nomination at the 1976 Republican National Convention
1980 electoral vote results
Ronald Reagan, moderator Jon Breen, and Bush participate in the Nashua, New Hampshire presidential debate, 1980
President and Mrs. Reagan at the 1981 inauguration parade
Supreme Court justice-nominee Sandra Day O'Connor talks with Reagan outside the White House, July 15, 1981.
Reagan outlines his plan for Tax Reduction Legislation in a televised address from the Oval Office, July 1981
Reagan addresses Congress on the Program for Economic Recovery, April 28, 1981 (a few weeks after surviving the assassination attempt)
As the first U.S. president invited to speak before the British Parliament (June 8, 1982), Reagan predicted Marxism–Leninism would end up on the "ash heap of history".
Meeting with leaders of the Afghan Mujahideen in the Oval Office, 1983
Reagan with actress Sigourney Weaver and King Fahd of Saudi Arabia in 1985. The U.S. and Saudi Arabia supplied money and arms to the anti-Soviet fighters in Afghanistan.
Reagan (far left) and First Lady Nancy Reagan pay their respects to the 17 American victims of the April 18 attack on the U.S. embassy by Hezbollah in Beirut, 1983
1984 presidential electoral votes by state. Reagan (red) won every state except Mondale's home state of Minnesota; Mondale also carried the District of Columbia.
Reagan is sworn in for a second term as president by Chief Justice Burger in the Capitol rotunda
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher (here with Reagan in 1986) granted the U.S. use of British airbases to launch the Libya attack.
Reagan (center) receives the Tower Commission Report regarding the Iran-Contra affair in the Cabinet Room with John Tower (left) and Edmund Muskie (right)
Challenging Gorbachev to "tear down this wall" at the Brandenburg Gate, June 12, 1987
Gorbachev and Reagan sign the INF Treaty at the White House, December 1987
The Reagans in Los Angeles, 1992
The Reagans with a model of USS Ronald Reagan, May 1996
Reagan lying in state in the Capitol rotunda
A bronze statue of Reagan standing in the National Statuary Hall Collection
President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev, 1985
Reagan in 1982
Approval ratings for President Reagan (Gallup)
Former President Reagan returns to the White House to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Bush, 1993
{{circa}} 1916–17. Pictured from left: Father Jack, older brother Neil, Reagan (with "Dutchboy" haircut), and mother Nelle
1920s. As a teenager, in Dixon, Illinois
{{circa|lk=no|1960}}. Hosting General Electric Theater
1976. At his home at Rancho del Cielo
1985. His second presidential portrait

A member of the Republican Party starting in 1962, he previously served as the 33rd governor of California from 1967 to 1975 after a career as a Hollywood actor and union leader.

After failed presidential bids in 1968 and 1976, challenging and nearly defeating sitting president Gerald Ford in the latter's Republican primaries, Reagan easily won the Republican nomination in the 1980 presidential election and went on to defeat incumbent Democratic president Jimmy Carter.

Official portrait, 1974

Gerald Ford

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American politician who served as the 38th president of the United States from 1974 to 1977, and was the only president never to have been elected to the office of president or vice president.

American politician who served as the 38th president of the United States from 1974 to 1977, and was the only president never to have been elected to the office of president or vice president.

Official portrait, 1974
The Gunnery officers of USS Monterey (CVL-26), 1943. Ford is second from the right, in the front row.
A billboard for Ford's 1948 congressional campaign from Michigan's 5th district
The Warren Commission (Ford 4th from left) presents its report to President Johnson (1964)
Congressman Gerald Ford, MSFC director Wernher von Braun, Congressman George H. Mahon, and NASA Administrator James E. Webb visit the Marshall Space Flight Center for a briefing on the Saturn program, 1964.
Gerald and Betty Ford with the President and First Lady Pat Nixon after President Nixon nominated Ford to be vice president, October 13, 1973.
Gerald Ford is sworn in as president by Chief Justice Warren Burger in the White House East Room, while Betty Ford looks on.
President Ford appears at a House Judiciary Subcommittee hearing in reference to his pardon of Richard Nixon
Ford meeting with his Cabinet, 1975
Ford and his golden retriever, Liberty, in the Oval Office, 1974
Cheney, Rumsfeld and Ford in the Oval Office, 1975
Ford meets with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev to sign a joint communiqué on the SALT treaty during the Vladivostok Summit, November 1974
Countries visited by Ford during his presidency
Ford with Anwar Sadat in Salzburg, 1975
Ford and his daughter Susan watch as Henry Kissinger (right) shakes hands with Mao Zedong, December 2, 1975
Indonesian President Suharto with Ford and Kissinger in Jakarta on December 6, 1975, one day before the Indonesian invasion of East Timor.
Reaction immediately after the second assassination attempt
John Paul Stevens, Ford's only Supreme Court appointment.
Governor Ronald Reagan congratulates President Ford after the president successfully wins the 1976 Republican nomination, while Bob Dole, Nancy Reagan, and Nelson Rockefeller look on.
Jimmy Carter and Ford in a presidential debate, September 23, 1976.
1976 electoral vote results
On July 16, 1980 (day 3 of the 1980 Republican National Convention) Gerald Ford consults with Bob Dole, Howard Baker and Bill Brock before making a decision to ultimately decline the offer to serve as Ronald Reagan's running mate
Ford joins President Bill Clinton and former presidents George H. W. Bush and Jimmy Carter on stage at the dedication of the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum at Texas A&M University, November 6, 1997
Ford at his 90th birthday with Laura Bush, President George W. Bush, and Betty Ford in the White House State Dining Room in 2003
Ford lying in state in the Capitol rotunda
The Fords on their wedding day, October 15, 1948
President George W. Bush with Ford and his wife Betty on April 23, 2006

He previously served as the leader of the Republican Party in the House of Representatives, and as the 40th vice president from 1973 to 1974.

In the 1976 Republican presidential primary campaign, Ford defeated former California Governor Ronald Reagan for the Republican nomination, but narrowly lost the presidential election to the Democratic challenger, former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter.

Ford considered a run for the Republican nomination in 1980, forgoing numerous opportunities to serve on corporate boards to keep his options open for a rematch with Carter.

2012 United States presidential election

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The 57th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012.

The 57th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012.

Mitt Romney on the campaign trail
President Obama talks with Ron Klain during presidential debate preparations. Senator John Kerry, at podium, played the role of Mitt Romney during the preparatory sessions.
President Obama casts his ballot at the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center in Chicago.
Swing from 2008 to 2012 in each state. Only six states swung more Democratic in 2012: Alaska, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, and New York. The arrows to the right represent how many places up or down on the list the state moved since 2008. States are listed by (increasing) percentage of Democratic votes.
Obama takes a phone call from Romney conceding the election early Wednesday morning in Chicago.
Gary Johnson
Jill Stein
Virgil Goode
Rocky Anderson
Results by state, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Results by county. Blue denotes counties that went to Obama; red denotes counties that went to Romney. Hawaii, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Vermont had all counties go to Obama. Oklahoma, Utah, and West Virginia had all counties go to Romney.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Popular vote by county shaded on a scale from red/Republican to blue/Democratic.
Results by state and the District of Columbia, scaled by number of Electors per state.
Cartogram of popular vote by county shaded on a scale from red/Republican to blue/Democratic where each county has been rescaled in proportion to its population.
Cartogram of the electoral vote results, with each square representing one electoral vote.
Results by congressional district.
Change in popular vote margins at the county level from the 2008 election to the 2012 election. Blue denotes counties that voted more Democratic. Red denotes counties that voted more Republican. Romney's strongest improvements over McCain were in Utah and Appalachia, while Obama's strongest gains were in Alaska, the New York area, and the Gulf states.
Treemap of the popular vote by county, state, and locally predominant recipient
The Empire State Building in New York City was lit blue when CNN called Ohio for Obama, projecting him the winner of the election. Likewise, red would have been used if Romney won.<ref>{{cite news |url= http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/new-york-state-building-displays-election-results-article-1.1197707 |title= Empire State Building lights up to broadcast election results |first=Charlie |last=Wells |newspaper=Daily News|location=New York |date=November 6, 2012}}</ref>
The Obamas and the Bidens embrace following the television announcement of their victory.
The Obamas and the Bidens walk on stage at the election night victory celebration at McCormick Place in Chicago.
Former Governor Mitt Romney meets with President Barack Obama at the White House after the 2012 presidential election.

Incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama and his running mate, incumbent Vice President Joe Biden, were re-elected to a second term.

They defeated the Republican ticket of businessman and former Governor Mitt Romney of Massachusetts and Representative Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

Gary Johnson's popular vote total set a Libertarian Party record, and his popular vote percentage was the second-best showing for a Libertarian in a presidential election, trailing only Ed Clark's in 1980.

2020 United States presidential election

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The 59th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020.

The 59th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020.

States and territories with at least one local, state, or federal primary election date or method of voting altered as of August 5, 2020.
A poll worker sanitizes an election booth in Davis, California
Chart of July 2020 opinion survey on likelihood of voting by mail in November election, compared to 2016
President Donald Trump with Amy Coney Barrett and her family, just prior to Barrett being announced as the nominee, September 26, 2020
George Floyd protests in Minneapolis on May 26
Early voting in Cleveland, Ohio
Hexagonal cartogram of the number of electoral college votes. States with opposite outcomes from 2016 are hatched.
People celebrate in the streets near the White House after the major networks projected Biden the winner of the election on November 7.
Senator Chuck Schumer addresses a crowd celebrating in Times Square, New York City shortly after the election was called for Biden.
Voters cast ballots at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa
Screenshot of a tweet from Trump's Twitter account where he repeatedly and falsely claimed he had won.
CNN fact checker Daniel Dale reported that through June 9, 2021, Trump had issued 132 written statements since leaving office, of which "a third have included lies about the election"—more than any other subject.
Pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6
Results by state, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Results by county
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
A discontinuous cartogram of the 2020 United States presidential election
A continuous county-level cartogram of the 2020 United States presidential election
County swing from 2016 to 2020
Election results by Congressional District
Shaded election results by county (red-purple-blue scale)
States shaded by margin of victory
Counties shaded by margin of victory

The Democratic ticket of former vice president Joe Biden and the junior U.S. senator from California Kamala Harris defeated the incumbent Republican president Donald Trump and incumbent vice president Mike Pence.

Although Ronald Reagan in 1980 and Bill Clinton in 1992 defeated their incumbent opponents by wider popular-vote margins, their shares of the vote were kept lower by substantial third-party voting.

Massachusetts

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Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

The Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall (1882). The Pilgrims founded Plymouth in 1620.
An illustration of the Battles of Lexington and Concord
John Adams, 2nd President of the United States (1797–1801)
Textile mills such as the one in Lowell made Massachusetts a leader in the Industrial Revolution.
John F. Kennedy, Massachusetts native and 35th President of the United States (1961–1963)
Boston Marathon bombing
A portion of the north-central Pioneer Valley in South Deerfield
Köppen climate types in Massachusetts
Massachusetts population density map. The centers of high-density settlement, from east to west, are Boston, Worcester, Springfield, and Pittsfield, respectively.
Saint Patrick's Day parade in Scituate, the municipality with the highest percentage identifying Irish ancestry in the United States, at 47.5% in 2010. Irish Americans constitute the largest ethnicity in Massachusetts.
Boston's Chinatown, with its paifang gate, is home to many Chinese and also Vietnamese restaurants.
Boston gay pride march, held annually in June. In 2004 Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to legalize same-sex marriage.
Built in 1681, the Old Ship Church in Hingham is the oldest church in America in continuous ecclesiastical use. Massachusetts has since become one of the most irreligious states in the U.S.
Towns in Massachusetts by combined mean SAT of their public high school district for the 2015–2016 academic year
Sunset at Brewster, on Cape Cod Bay.
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, serving Greater Boston
Logan International Airport in Boston is the largest airport in New England in terms of passenger volume
Prominent roads and cities in Massachusetts
The Massachusetts State House, topped by its golden dome, faces Boston Common on Beacon Hill.
Charlie Baker (R), the 72nd Governor of Massachusetts
Boston Pride Parade, 2012. From left: Representative Joe Kennedy III, Senator Elizabeth Warren, and former representative Barney Frank.
The site of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond in Concord
Massachusetts has the largest population of the New England states. New Englander culture and identity remains strong in Massachusetts (Flag of New England pictured above).
An outdoor dance performance at Jacob's Pillow in Becket
USS Constitution fires a salute during its annual Fourth of July turnaround cruise
Map showing the average medicare reimbursement per enrollee for the counties in Massachusetts.
Gillette Stadium in Foxborough is the home venue for the New England Patriots (NFL) and the New England Revolution (MLS)
Koppen climate of Massachusetts
A 1779 five-shilling note issued by Massachusetts.
Koppen climate of Massachusetts

Massachusetts politics since the second half of the 20th century have generally been dominated by the Democratic Party, and the state has a reputation for being the most liberal state in the country.

Massachusetts has shifted from a previously Republican-leaning state to one largely dominated by Democrats; the 1952 victory of John F. Kennedy over incumbent Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. is seen as a watershed moment in this transformation.

Additionally, Massachusetts provided Reagan with his smallest margins of victory in both the 1980 and 1984 elections.